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Playlist of Viennese Modernism (Part1) - VIENNA/NOW

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  • City of Dreams : Art in Vienna Part 1

    4:02

    We visit the Belvedere Gallery in Vienna and Tate Liverpool to discover why there was such an explosion in the arts at the turn of the century.

  • City of Dreams : Social Changes in 20th Century Vienna

    6:51

    Julian Johnson looks at the social aspects of the changes in Vienna, and how the decline of the Austro-Hungarian empire in combination with other social changes affected the art of Vienna.

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  • Koloman Moser meets Mahler

    9:12

    The art of Koloman Moser the Austrian artist - March 30, 1868 -- October 18, 1918.
    Music by Amarcord Wien - Mahler's Adagietto from his Symphony 5

  • Au Temps de Klimt, la Sécession à Vienne

    3:31

    La Pinacothèque de Paris propose de février à juin 2015 une rétrospective sur la Sécession, ce mouvement fondamental de l’Art Nouveau qui s’est développé à Vienne au début du siècle dernier, dont le chef de file fut Gustav Klimt, et dans lequel l’expressionnisme, courant majeur de l’art moderne, a puisé ses racines. Lire la suite sur artsixMic :

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  • Gustav Klimt - Beethovenfries - Wiener Secession - Art On Screen - NEWS

    1:10

    Art On Screen - presents: Gustav Klimt - Beethovenfreis - Wiener Secession - Monlight Sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven | Video powered by Bono Media - interacactive.

  • mumok vienna live p2

    47

    'architecture and sound' live at the MUMOK vienna.
    Helmut Wolfgruber and Herbert Gollini performing at the museum of modern arts MUMOK vienna, playing the lavastones covering the building to create a musical and unique cosmos of sound.
    recorded live on october 2nd 2010 'Lange Nacht der Museen'

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  • Bach: B minor Mass , Hermann Scherchen, Vienna 1950

    1:4:05

    Johann Sebastian Bach
    Mass in B minor BWV 232 - 1. Missa (Kyrie, Gloria)

    Emmy Loose, soprano
    Hilde Ceska, soprano
    Gertrud Burgsthaler-Schuster, contralto
    Anton Dermota, Tenor
    Alfred Poell, baritone
    Akademie-Kammerchor
    Vienna Symphony Orchestra
    conductor: Hermann Scherchen
    recorded X/1950

    Transfer from vinyl LPs Westminster WAL 301 (ca. 1955). According to European law, copyright has expired.

    Symbolum Nicaenum (Credo):
    Sanctus, Agnus Dei:

    This is Hermann Scherchen's very first recording for the famous Westminster label. Like anything by Scherchen, it is not suitable for easy listening. The opening Kyrie will most obviously deter many listeners who are nowadays used to a much more fluent execution: Scherchen's rendition is the slowest ever recorded (even slower than Klemperer and Celibidache), and the singing of the formerly acclaimed Viennese Academy Chamber Choir seems hopelessly out of style. But anyone who is patient enough to continue listening will be surprised by the vivid Christe eleison. This kind of contrast between markedly stretched and downright swift movements pervades the whole Mass (culminating at Cruxificus and Et resurrexit in the Credo section). Long before the historically informed school Scherchen recognized the dancing characters in Bach's music, but he also cherishes intimate contemplation (instead of rushing through one movement after another, as it is usual today). At the surface, this noteworthy recording seems to sound outdated, but to the attentive listener it reveals a stunning modernity and deep insights.

  • MAHLER CONDUCTS MAHLER: Symphony No. 1 via Artist Otto Böhler

    6:32

    Composer Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) / Symphony No. 1 (Titan), 1st Movement (fragment) / Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Bruno Walter (1876-1962) / Recorded: 1961 / Illustrations of Mahler conducting by Otto Böhler (1847-1913)

    The Symphony No. 1 in D major by Gustav Mahler was mainly composed between late 1887 and March 1888, though it incorporates music Mahler had composed for previous works. It was composed while Mahler was second conductor at the Leipzig Opera, Germany. Although in his letters Mahler almost always referred to the work as a symphony, the first two performances described it as a symphonic poem or tone poem. The work was premièred at the Vigadó Concert Hall, Budapest in 1889, but was not well received. Mahler made some major revisions for the second performance, given at Hamburg in October 1893; further alterations were made in the years prior to the first publication, in late 1898. Some modern performances and recordings give the work the title Titan, despite the fact that Mahler only used this label for two early performances, and never after the work had reached its definitive four-movement form in 1896.



    Gustav Mahler (German: [ˈɡʊstaf ˈmaːlɐ]; 7 July 1860 – 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kaliště in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century.



    Bruno Walter (born Bruno Schlesinger, September 15, 1876 – February 17, 1962) was a German-born conductor, pianist, and composer. Born in Berlin, he left Germany in 1933 to escape the Third Reich, settling finally in the United States in 1939. He worked closely with Gustav Mahler, whose music he helped establish in the repertory, held major positions with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Concertgebouw Orchestra, Salzburg Festival, Vienna State Opera, Bavarian State Opera, Staatsoper Unter den Linden and Deutsche Oper Berlin, among others, made recordings of historical and artistic significance, and is widely considered one of the great conductors of the 20th century.



    Otto Böhler (1847–1913) was an Austrian silhouette artist who specialized in portraits of many great conductors, composers, and pianists of his time. Otto Boehler was the fifth son of the merchant Georg Friedrich Böhler and spent his childhood and youth in Frankfurt am Main. At the University of Tübingen, he studied to PhD philosophy. In 1870 he moved with his brothers Albert (1845–1899) and Friedrich (1849–1914) to Vienna and participated after the death of his brother, Emil (1842–1882) at the family business. Albert and Emil founded a steel industry, which is now part of Böhler-Uddeholm. Following his artistic talent, he became a pupil of the painter and writer Wenzel Ottokar Noltsch (1835–1908). Soon, however, he turned to the art of the silhouette, and found in his musical environment a rich field. Böhler's friends were to include the singer Amalie Materna, Hermann Winkelmann, Theodor Reichmann, and musicians of the Vienna Philharmonic. In 1876 he attended as a member of the Bayreuth Patrons Association, the first Bayreuth Festival, and paid homage to his musical god Richard Wagner. Böhler was married and had four children. He died in 1913; two years earlier he had been diagnosed with a heart condition. He was buried in the family vault in the Hietzinger Cemetery. Böhler has held in silhouette almost all the German composers from Bach to Mahler, but also conductors and pianists of his time. The original works remained only sporadically, mainly in museums. His motifs were often reprinted, e.g. on postcards and in newspapers.




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  • Pop und Rock Musik 2016 aus Wien

    10:54

    Pop und Rock Musik aus WIEN
    Die Nummer 1 in Wien

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  • the sex cripples - karls disco wiener haven

    1:32

  • Das Konzert Hermann Bahr: Akademietheater 1964 Teil 7

    10:45

    Das Konzert Hermann Bahr: Akademietheater 1964 Teil 7

    Aufzeichnung aus dem Akademietheater 1964 mit
    Gustav Heink, Pianist - Robert Lindner
    Marie, seine Frau - Susi Nicoletti
    Dr. Franz Jura - Peter Weck
    Delfine, seine Frau - Johanna Matz
    Eva Gerndl - Loni Friedl
    Pollinger - Hugo Gottschlich
    Frau Pollinger- Gusti Wolf
    Regie: Josef Meinrad
    Bühnenbild: Lois Egg
    Kostüme: Erni Kniepert

  • 20. Gedichte zur Lage

    3:02

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    20. Gedichte zur Lage · Will Quadflieg · Wiener Singverein · Wiener Symphoniker · Ferdinand Leitner

    Wir entdecken Komponisten: Ludwig van Beethoven – Streit um einen Götterfunken

    ℗ 1985 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

    Released on: 2017-01-01

    Producer: Lothar Beisenherz
    Studio Personnel, Recording Engineer: Gerd Henjes
    Author: Marei Obladen
    Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - d. Die zwei blauen ...

    4:49

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - d. Die zwei blauen Augen (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Wyklad 2 Arthur Schnitzler – przedstawiciel wiedeńskiego modernizmu

    51:13

  • Herb Weidner Valse macabre

    4:06

    Ein Walzer für die Toten und die Lebenden für Klavier in fis-moll op.1281vie. Am Klavier : Herb Weidner. Gemälde von Gustav Klimt Hoffnung.

  • Gesamtkunstwerk - A Story in 24 Images

    5:41

    About The Project:

    In 6th Grade General Music class at Pulaski Community Middle School, students spent 4 months rehearsing and developing this project, inspired by German composer Richard Wagner’s concept of the gesamtkunstwerk. A gesamtkunstwerk is a work of art that makes use of all or many art forms or strives to do so. Wagner used this term to describe his operas, which were more grandiose than the operas of composers before him; the music was more involved, the sets more intricate, the dance components more complicated, and the literature more poetic than before. Wagner first used this term in his writings about his ideal of unifying all works of art via the theatre.

    In class, students learned about Wagner’s work as well as how his theories have influenced other more modern artists. With this information in mind and under Mr. Smith’s guidance, a team of 57 student volunteers from 6th - 12th grade worked alongside the 100 6th grade general music students to create a modern gesamtkunstwerk of their own. During the rehearsals for this project, students learned to synthesize movement with music and expanded their study of key concepts by engaging with other similar works of art. This original gesamtkunstwerk combines the art forms of music, dance, theatre, physical art, stagecraft, film, and performance art.

    Starring: The Pulaski Community Middle School 6th Grade General Music Classes

    Directed by: Jackson Smith

    Original Artwork by: Sara Hoffman

    Story Written by: Jackson Smith & Tyler VanderGaast

    Edited by: Jayce Nall

    Funding Provided by: The Pulaski Community School Education Foundation

    Special thanks to the the staff at FedEx print and ship center #5194 and Small Quantity Boxes in Neenah, WI for donating materials.

    Crew: Layona Andre, Lilas Fredricksen, Marilyn Koehler, Tracci Mittag, Jackson Smith, Tyler VanderGaast, Caleb Weis, Delaney Nickerson, Makayla Hoppman, Maggie Jandric, Sarah Kurowski, Sam Murphy, Austin Kobylarczyk, Grace Goodness, Callie Widi, Brayden Pelot, Grayson Rondou, Bella Eibenholzl, Carter Ollmann, Joe Stumpf, Rachel Ebent, Julianne Ericksen, Jordyn Beckard, Grace Nguyen, Charlie Duffrin, Sofia Czarnecki, Gracelin Feutz, Eli Haut, Katie Heck, Jake Heston, Donovan Holderness, Hailey Kuczer, Robin Lauman, Tony Nooyen, Lia Richgels, Megan Spredemann, Julie Truckenbrod, Lacy Yurek, Riley Crocker, Lilly Nygren, Amelia Rasmussen, Olivia Sanders, Cora Zuleger, Autumn Nguyen, Audryn Just, Timothy Huber, Dalton Panske, Noah Farrell, Brayden Morlan, Mackenzie Drevs, Max Wasilew, Hannah Wielgus.

  • BIKER MAN,der 1. Harleysong aus Wien

    1:45

    ADVenture Nr.5 feat. Rudolfo spüin nua fia Eich
    BIKER MAN den ultimativ'n Harley-Song (im Wiener Dialekt)
    Text & voc. alf ein Zz Top cover

  • Kapitel 1: Gedichte

    31

    Provided to YouTube by Kontor New Media GmbH

    Kapitel 1: Gedichte · Egon Schiele & Julian Sharp

    Gedichte

    ℗ Audio Media Digital

    Released on: 2015-02-10

    Artist: Egon Schiele
    Artist, Narrator: Julian Sharp
    Music Publisher: Audio Media Digital
    Lyricist: Egon Schiele

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • The Unanswered Question 1973 5 The XXth Century Crisis Bernstein Norton

    2:13:58

    The Unanswered Question 1973 5 The XXth Century Crisis Bernstein Norton

  • Russia and Igor Stravinsky - The Music of the Twentieth Century

    8:21

    An introduction to the fourth lecture of Robert Greenberg's “The Music of the Twentieth Century” webcourse - Russia and Igor Stravinsky!

    Get the course today at

  • x
  • Beethoven :: Sonata opus 53 :: Wim Winters, clavichord

    11:50

    If you once, ever, be it just a fraction of a second, or more serious, longer, as a fixed idea, thought of me as being that guy with his somewhat crazy Beethoven-clavichord relationship, this video proofs you're right.

    I am.

    So, after this very open, and honest self reflection, the most logical question next: why?

    The Afterthoughts videos (it will be 2 separate videos this time), will talk on that, but very short:

    1. It gives new perspectives to Beethoven's music
    2. I love the baroque aroma the clavichord gives to his music
    3. It is technically challenging, which is always a nice extra, because you can take those experiences to other music
    4. His music is (in general) a perfect test for instruments, certainly for clavichords, testing it to the edges
    5. The clavichord sounds so much better after some hours of Beethoven fortissimo's (it really does).

    Next question: is it historic?

    I think the answer is yes and no. Yes, because there are sources describing us how the clavichord still was used after 1800, and more so that it was used for Viennese 'modern' music. There is a wonderful anecdote regarding to G.Türk on which we will come back in one of the future videos. But even without 'proof': clavichords were so much present, they did not vanish at once, with Beethoven's first sonatas, somwhere 1793. And of course they still were used, and of course also for new music. I'd say: in the first place for new music.

    And no, because Beethoven did not write this Waldstein sonata for clavichord, but clearly with the pianoforte in mind. As he probably did with all his keyboard. The earlier sonatas (this one was written in 1802), still had that old keyboard flavor, the reminder of the instruments he certainly knew well from his younger years, his education, and possibly still surrounded him at his later years -I admit that I have to reread many things with this idea in mind-, but the modernity of Vienna required him to write modern music, both in terms of language and technique. And that was the pianoforte. Period.

    Knowing all this, why do I play it on clavichord?

    My answer would be a new question: why not?

    I certainly would not do it when I had the slightest idea that it would not work. I believe it works great. My 6 octave pianoforte is expected for early 2017, so the clavichord is all I have at the moment (the Erard is no option for me in this regard, far less than the clavichord, but that is personal, Beethoven CAN sound beautiful on the Erard). But again, even WITH the pianoforte in house, I would still often play Beethoven on my clavichord. His language comes so close often to that of CPEBach on that instrumant. And I like it really that much.

    But this Waldstein sonata is 1802. And that is VERY late for the clavichord. I'll explain some of the difficulties in the 2d episode of the Afterthought videos, and apart from the changes I had to make in compass (which is never a deal breaker to me, that IS a very historic practice), I had to change passages in order to be able to play them on the clavichord. Also, that is no deal breaker to me (and also that is historic practice...), but to the player of today, it is a clear sign that, for this sonata, and more or less for all the later works (not all), the clavichord period is over. But, as said, WITH the changes, it is really nice to experience this famous work on a real 18th century instrument.

    I hope you share that feel!

    BTW: Do not forget to watch yesterday's video, about the 100 music video-project, really looking forward to feature you all in the upcoming book / CD's !! Here is the link:


    Take care!

    Wim
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  • Draugr - Ver Sacrum

    4:42

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 3. Ruhevoil

    20:15

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 3. Ruhevoil (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler Unleashed: The Aura of Mahler

    20:20

    Join NEC faculty John Heiss and President Tony Woodcock discuss the NEC Contemporary Ensemble's concert The Aura of Mahler which features a program of works by Mahler, his Viennese modernist contemporaries and successors, and more recent composers who have perpetuated Mahler's aura.
    The concert will be held Tuesday November 15 in NEC's Jordan Hall. For more information about our concert series marking the centennial of Mahler's death please visit:

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 4. Sehr behaglich

    8:43

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 4. Sehr behaglich (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - b. Ging heut morgeri

    4:05

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - b. Ging heut morgeri (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - IV. Ur...

    20:18

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - IV. Urlicht V. Im tempo des scherzo (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Schoenberg - Verklärte Nacht, Op. 4 Audio + Score

    28:51

    Arnold Schoenberg [1874 - 1951] - Verklärte Nacht, Op. 8 [1899]

    Schoenberg’s voracious intellect found much to feast upon in the culture debates raging in fin de siècle Vienna, his native city. For it was a milieu rich in arts institutions with strong conservative proclivities reflective of a self-satisfied middle class sure of Vienna’s hegemony over European music. This view was counterbalanced by a strong critical reaction. Many artists and thinkers informed by an emerging modernist aesthetic were repulsed by what they perceived to be a stagnant, commercialized popular culture wallowing in the decay of late Romanticism. Schoenberg aligned himself with the modernist aesthetic, defending this position in music and in word for decades to come.

    In addition to these generalized cultural conflicts, Viennese musicians were divided by the Brahms/Wagner controversy as to which of these two composers was the more progressive. In a nutshell, the argument centered upon the contrast between the Brahmsian aesthetic of a pure “absolute” music developmentally self referential and abstract, and the Wagnerian aesthetic reliant upon extra-musical programmatic elements for its discourse.

    This was the cultural context in which the young Schoenberg composed Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night) between September and December 1899. During the four preceding years (1894-97) Schoenberg wrote several instrumental works that were self-consciously expressive of the Brahmsian view toward the autonomy of musical structure and technique that he was later to describe as “developing variation”. However, in 1898 he made the very important discovery of the volume of poetry Weib und Welt (Woman and World) by the modernist poet Richard Dehmel. In these poems Dehmel articulated a philosophy of transformation that sought to reconcile the contradictions such as male-female, subject-object, god-nature, light-darkness etc., through the unity of poetic forms which he further hoped would bring about reconciliation of the individual with the universal. His poems challenged the reigning modes of expression, suggesting that modernity and innovation were essential to cultural change.

    For what really occurs in this poem is a celebration of new life, both literally and figuratively. The process by which this happens is through a kind of mystical impregnation or, better still, interpenetration of a human warmth from the woman into the man and vice versa. As the man states: “But a special warmth flickers/From you into me, from me into you./It will transfigure the strange man’s child.” The woman and man have radically transfigured the artificiality of societal convention to merge with a radiantly confluent universe.

    Verklärte Nacht was originally scored for string sextet, making it the first chamber music written as a symphonic poem. Schoenberg arranged the original string sextet for string orchestra in 1917. He later revised it in 1943, the version heard on this concert.

    Following is a translation of Dehmel’s poem Verklärte Nacht by Stanley Appelbaum.

    'Two people walk through a bare, cold grove;
    The moon races along with them, they look into it.
    The moon races over tall oaks,
    No cloud obscures the light from the sky,
    Into which the black points of the boughs reach.
    A woman’s voice speaks:
    I’m carrying a child, and not yours,
    I walk in sin beside you.
    I have committed a great offense against myself.
    I no longer believed I could be happy
    And yet I had a strong yearning
    For something to fill my life, for the joys of
    Motherhood
    And for duty; so I committed an effrontery,
    So, shuddering, I allowed my sex
    To be embraced by a strange man,
    And, on top of that, I blessed myself for it.
    Now life has taken its revenge:
    Now I have met you, oh, you.
    She walks with a clumsy gait,
    She looks up; the moon is racing along.
    Her dark gaze is drowned in light.
    A man’s voice speaks:
    May the child you conceived
    Be no burden to your soul;
    Just see how brightly the universe is gleaming!
    There’s a glow around everything;
    You are floating with me on a cold ocean,
    But a special warmth flickers
    From you into me, from me into you.
    It will transfigure the strange man’s child.
    You will bear the child for me, as if it were mine;
    You have brought the glow into me,
    You have made me like a child myself.
    He grasps her around her ample hips.
    Their breath kisses in the breeze.
    Two people walk through the lofty, bright night.'
    (

    Artemis Quartet:
    Natalia Prischepenko, Heime Müller (violins)
    Volker Jacobsen (viola)
    Eckart Runge (cello)

    Members of the Alban Berg Quartet:
    Thomas Kakuska (viola)
    Valentin Erben (cello)

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  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - II. An...

    9:42

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - II. Andante con moto (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 1. Badachtig, Nicht e...

    15:10

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 1. Badachtig, Nicht ellen (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - IV. Ur...

    1:41

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - IV. Urlicht Sehr feierlich aber schlicht (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Der Rosenkavalier - Angela Denoke The Marschallins Monologue - James Allen Gähres, cond.

    25:55

    ANGELA DENOKE sings 'The Marschallin's Monologue', Act One of the opera Der Rosenkavalier, Op. 59 by Richard Strauss.

    James Allen Gähres, conductor
    Marschallin: Angela Denoke, soprano
    Octavian: Ute Döring, mezzo-soprano

    Ulm Philharmonic

    Live recorded during open public performance.
    Ulm, Germany
    All rights reserved.

    00:00 Da geht er hin, der aufgeblasene Kerl
    05:36 Ach, du bist wieder da
    09:24 Bis in mein Herz hinein
    11:29 Die Zeit, die ist ein sonderbar Ding
    16:17 Heut oder Morgen
    18:32 Ich werd jetzt in die Kirche gehen
    21:51 Ich hab Ihn nicht einmal gekuesst!

    R. Strauss - Rosenkavalier, Angela Denoke sings 'Hab mirs gelobt' - James Allen Gähres, cond.:

    R. Strauss - Vier letzte Lieder - Angela Denoke - James Allen Gähres, cond.:

    At the age of 47, Richard Strauss was as formidable a modernist as any composer on the Western music scene. His revolutionary tone poems, from Don Juan to Heldenleben, had made him world-famous, and his two operas Salomé (1905) and Elektra (1909) had both shocked and delighted the musical world. While wildly successful, Der Rosenkavalier, which premiered in Dresden on January 26, 1911, was considered by many critics to be a step back, as though Strauss, who had reached the verge of atonality in his previous stage works, had shied back from taking the next step and retreated into the past instead.

    One still occasionally hears this hundred-year-old cliché of Strauss reception, but it is important to emphasize that it rests on a fundamental misconception. Even though Strauss may have made copious allusions to the music of the 18th century - the century in which the action takes place - there is nothing conservative about the opera, in its harmonic idiom or in any other respect. One cannot imagine it being written even ten years earlier. It is just that after composing two tragedies that presented radically new interpretations of ancient stories, Strauss wanted to tackle a subject closer to his own time, one where no one dies for a change. He and his collaborator, the great Austrian poet Hugo von Hofmannsthal who had also written the libretto of Elektra, conjured up the Vienna of Empress Maria Theresa (1740-1780), using that world as a backdrop to a story about timeless topics such as aging, or the differences between nobility of birth and nobility of spirit.

    On February 11, 1909, Hofmannsthal announced to the composer that he had drafted a scenario for a comedy, with colorful action, and opportunities for lyricism, wit, humor and even a brief ballet. Two great roles, one for a baritone and the other for a graceful young girl dressed as a boy... By April, he had delivered the words to the first scene, and Strauss was delighted: Composition will flow like oil... On April 23, Hofmannsthal advised: Come up with an old-fashioned, partly sweet, partly cheeky Viennese waltz for the last act, which will pervade the entire act... (This waltz now begins, famously, in Act II.) In July Strauss demanded, and obtained, a thorough revision of Act II; the plot of that act as we know it today was devised entirely by Strauss. The composer was often unsparing in his criticism, firm and outspoken but always respectful. At one point, he wrote: Don't forget that the audience needs to laugh! Laugh, not just smile and chuckle! Wagner's Meistersinger kept coming up as a constant reference in the correspondence between the co-authors - and in fact, both the Marschallin and Hans Sachs willingly step aside in favor of a young pair of lovers. In both operas, the young male lover also has a ridiculous rival in Beckmesser and Ochs, respectively. The entire score was finished by September 26.

    The role of Octavian was conceived from the start as a trouser role, following the example of Cherubino in Mozart's Marriage of Figaro, another work that obviously served as a model. (Cherubino is also dressed up as a girl at one point.) Yet Cherubino is only a secondary character, while Octavian is the title role; his 'manliness' is established even before the curtain goes up in Act I and remains a key factor throughout the opera. Strauss may have wanted to emphasize Octavian's youthfulness by giving his part to a female singer, but the musical reason for his choice is equally important: he needed equal, intertwining voices when Octavian sang with the Marschallin or with Sophie, and most crucially in the glorious moment involving all three characters at the end of the opera.

    The world premiere of this comedy for music became, as Norman Del Mar put it in his classic three-volume Strauss biography, beyond question the most riotous success that even Strauss had ever had. It immediately entered the regular repertoire of large opera houses around the world. Its popularity has endured without interruption for over a century now and many great singers have built their careers on the roles of the Marschallin, Octavian or Baron Ochs.

  • Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder - e. In diesem Wetter

    6:10

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder - e. In diesem Wetter (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 2. In gemachlicher Be...

    8:36

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 2. In gemachlicher Bewegung (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - a. Wenn mein Schatz

    4:10

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - a. Wenn mein Schatz (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - V. A. ...

    13:52

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - V. A. Finale Im tempo de scherzo I (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - I. All...

    21:55

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - I. Allegro maestoso (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - c. Ich hab ein glue...

    2:59

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - c. Ich hab ein gluehendes messer (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

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