This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Playlist of Viennese Modernism (Part1) - VIENNA/NOW

x
  • A discussion with Van Dyke Parks: The Vernacular & Beyond

    1:40:27

    Samuel Andreyev talks with the legendary composer, songwriter, singer and arranger, Van Dyke Parks.

    Van Dyke Parks on Twitter:

    Samuel Andreyev on Twitter: Help keep this channel going:

  • x
  • Manchester Music Festival – Get to Know the Music: Beethoven Rediscovered

    39:41

    Welcome to the free 2020 Manchester Music Festival Digital Concert Hall! Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel by hitting the red subscribe button, and also like this video by hitting the thumbs-up button. MMF is on Instagram and Facebook, so be sure to follow us! It is highly recommended to view all of our videos in high definition by changing your view settings for your YouTube player (within the YouTube player itself, click Settings/Quality/1080pHD).

    This educational video – part of the MMF Get to Know the Music series – delves into the life, work, and enduring legacy of Ludwig van Beethoven. 2020 marks the 250th anniversary of this great composer's birth, and his music is a central theme of the 2020 Manchester Music Festival.

    Our detailed Digital Schedule is available on our website at Don't forget to stay up-to-date and to sign up for our mailing list by visiting

    Here is a synopsis of our 2020 event schedule:

    June 18, Get to Know the Music: Classical & Romantic
    June 23, Spotlight Interview with the Miró Quartet [live Zoom, not YouTube]
    June 25, Get to Know the Music: Sonata Form
    June 30, Get to Know the Music: Female Composers Rediscovered
    July 2, Performance Chat: Celebration of Female Composers
    July 5, Performance Chat: Celebration of Beethoven - Part 1
    July 7, Performance Chat: Celebration of Beethoven - Part 2
    July 9, Marquee Concert 1: MingHuan Xu (violin) & Winston Choi (piano)
    July 12, MMF Revisited: Young Artists Concert Highlights
    July 14, Spotlight Interview with Mia Wang (2017 Young Artists alumna)
    July 16, Marquee Concert 2: Stefan Milenkovich (violin)
    July 19, MMF Revisited: Chamber Music Concert Highlights
    July 21, Spotlight Interview with Craig Sheppard (piano)
    July 23, Marquee Concert 3: Ariella Mak-Neiman & Adam Neiman (piano)
    July 26, MMF Revisited: 2018 A Night at the Opera
    July 28, Spotlight Interview with Warren Jones (piano)
    July 30, Marquee Concert 4: Amit Peled & Ismael Bombut Guerrero (cello)
    August 2, MMF Revisited: 2019 Vocal Workshop Recital
    August 4, Spotlight Interview with Ignat Solzhenitsyn (conductor & piano)
    August 6, Marquee Concert 5: Vadim Lando & Maxim Lando (clarinet & piano)
    August 9, MMF Revisited: Orchestra Concert Highlights

    Read about all of our artists at and visit to read more about Artistic Director and Digital Concert Hall host, Adam Neiman.

    If you like what you see and hear on our channel, please consider making a tax-deductible donation to MMF by visiting:

    Reach out to us with any questions or concerns, at

    We can't wait to see you at all of our wonderful broadcasts!

    Audio Credits for Beethoven Rediscovered

    All piano music recorded by Adam Neiman
    Piano Sonata in B-flat Major, Op. 106 “Hammerklavier”
    Adam Neiman, Aeolian Classics

    Cello Sonata in G minor, Op. 5 No. 2 - Live at MMF, Edward Arron (cello) & Jeewon Park (piano)

    Piano Trio in B-flat Major, Op. 97 “Archduke” - Live at MMF
    Emily Daggett Smith (violin), Bion Tsang (cello), Adam Neiman (piano)

    String Quartet in A Major, Op. 18 No. 5 - Miró Quartet


    String Quartet, Op. 131 - Orion Quartet via Musopen
    Große Fuga, Op. 133 - European Archive, Musopen
    Symphonies Nos. 3, 5, 9 - European Archive, Musopen

    Photo Credits for Beethoven Rediscovered
    Beautiful Austria - Annemieke van Leeuwen

  • x
  • Music Educator Profile: Film Composer and Professor of Composition Paul Chihara of UCLA

    31:43

    In this clip from - Paul Chihara, Professor of Composition at UCLA, discusses his career and the world of film composing from the point of view of someone with a stake in both the academic and professional worlds. He addresses the film composing process - like how a composer works with a director, how to integrate existing songs into a score, how technology is changing how film composers work, and how to get into the field -- as well as the history of film composition and why young composes should know it, where he gets his creative energy, and how film music has influenced the growing world of music for video games.

  • November 6, 2014 - Alex Ross Pre-Concert Lecture Composers and Critics, Composers as Critics

    28:45

    Pre-Concert Lecture
    Alex Ross
    Composers and Critics, Composers as Critics

    Davies Symphony Hall
    San Francisco, California
    November 6, 2014

  • x
  • Madness & Modernity: Mental illness and the visual arts in Vienna 1900

    8:28

    Three weeks before Madness and Modernity opens, the curators look ahead to the opening and discuss the themes of the exhibition; from the mad body to the influence of psychiatry on modernist architecture.

    For more information on the exhibition go to

  • City of Dreams : Social Changes in 20th Century Vienna

    6:51

    Julian Johnson looks at the social aspects of the changes in Vienna, and how the decline of the Austro-Hungarian empire in combination with other social changes affected the art of Vienna.

  • x
  • Beethoven :: Sonata opus 53 :: Wim Winters, clavichord

    11:50

    If you once, ever, be it just a fraction of a second, or more serious, longer, as a fixed idea, thought of me as being that guy with his somewhat crazy Beethoven-clavichord relationship, this video proofs you're right.

    I am.

    So, after this very open, and honest self reflection, the most logical question next: why?

    The Afterthoughts videos (it will be 2 separate videos this time), will talk on that, but very short:

    1. It gives new perspectives to Beethoven's music
    2. I love the baroque aroma the clavichord gives to his music
    3. It is technically challenging, which is always a nice extra, because you can take those experiences to other music
    4. His music is (in general) a perfect test for instruments, certainly for clavichords, testing it to the edges
    5. The clavichord sounds so much better after some hours of Beethoven fortissimo's (it really does).

    Next question: is it historic?

    I think the answer is yes and no. Yes, because there are sources describing us how the clavichord still was used after 1800, and more so that it was used for Viennese 'modern' music. There is a wonderful anecdote regarding to G.Türk on which we will come back in one of the future videos. But even without 'proof': clavichords were so much present, they did not vanish at once, with Beethoven's first sonatas, somwhere 1793. And of course they still were used, and of course also for new music. I'd say: in the first place for new music.

    And no, because Beethoven did not write this Waldstein sonata for clavichord, but clearly with the pianoforte in mind. As he probably did with all his keyboard. The earlier sonatas (this one was written in 1802), still had that old keyboard flavor, the reminder of the instruments he certainly knew well from his younger years, his education, and possibly still surrounded him at his later years -I admit that I have to reread many things with this idea in mind-, but the modernity of Vienna required him to write modern music, both in terms of language and technique. And that was the pianoforte. Period.

    Knowing all this, why do I play it on clavichord?

    My answer would be a new question: why not?

    I certainly would not do it when I had the slightest idea that it would not work. I believe it works great. My 6 octave pianoforte is expected for early 2017, so the clavichord is all I have at the moment (the Erard is no option for me in this regard, far less than the clavichord, but that is personal, Beethoven CAN sound beautiful on the Erard). But again, even WITH the pianoforte in house, I would still often play Beethoven on my clavichord. His language comes so close often to that of CPEBach on that instrumant. And I like it really that much.

    But this Waldstein sonata is 1802. And that is VERY late for the clavichord. I'll explain some of the difficulties in the 2d episode of the Afterthought videos, and apart from the changes I had to make in compass (which is never a deal breaker to me, that IS a very historic practice), I had to change passages in order to be able to play them on the clavichord. Also, that is no deal breaker to me (and also that is historic practice...), but to the player of today, it is a clear sign that, for this sonata, and more or less for all the later works (not all), the clavichord period is over. But, as said, WITH the changes, it is really nice to experience this famous work on a real 18th century instrument.

    I hope you share that feel!

    BTW: Do not forget to watch yesterday's video, about the 100 music video-project, really looking forward to feature you all in the upcoming book / CD's !! Here is the link:


    Take care!

    Wim
    ==================================================
    Stay updated (+free MP3 of all Bach's Inventions) ▶
    Subscribe ▶
    All recordings ▶
    ==============================================
    Listen / Buy in CD quality ▶ (and support Authentic Sound)
    ==============================================
    Connect with me on:
    Facebook ▶
    Twitter ▶
    Website: ▶

  • City of Dreams : Art in Vienna Part 1

    4:02

    We visit the Belvedere Gallery in Vienna and Tate Liverpool to discover why there was such an explosion in the arts at the turn of the century.

  • Gustav Klimt - Beethovenfries - Wiener Secession - Art On Screen - NEWS

    1:10

    Art On Screen - presents: Gustav Klimt - Beethovenfreis - Wiener Secession - Monlight Sonata by Ludwig van Beethoven | Video powered by Bono Media - interacactive.

  • x
  • City of Dreams : Interaction in the Arts

    3:00

    In music and painting, we tend to fix our attention on a few astonishing individuals. But the nature of Viennese culture around 1900 was one of collective energy and vision. We speak to Michael Hoffman and Bernhard Kerres to find out more.

  • Draugr - Ver Sacrum

    4:42

  • Bach: B minor Mass , Hermann Scherchen, Vienna 1950

    1:4:05

    Johann Sebastian Bach
    Mass in B minor BWV 232 - 1. Missa (Kyrie, Gloria)

    Emmy Loose, soprano
    Hilde Ceska, soprano
    Gertrud Burgsthaler-Schuster, contralto
    Anton Dermota, Tenor
    Alfred Poell, baritone
    Akademie-Kammerchor
    Vienna Symphony Orchestra
    conductor: Hermann Scherchen
    recorded X/1950

    Transfer from vinyl LPs Westminster WAL 301 (ca. 1955). According to European law, copyright has expired.

    Symbolum Nicaenum (Credo):
    Sanctus, Agnus Dei:

    This is Hermann Scherchen's very first recording for the famous Westminster label. Like anything by Scherchen, it is not suitable for easy listening. The opening Kyrie will most obviously deter many listeners who are nowadays used to a much more fluent execution: Scherchen's rendition is the slowest ever recorded (even slower than Klemperer and Celibidache), and the singing of the formerly acclaimed Viennese Academy Chamber Choir seems hopelessly out of style. But anyone who is patient enough to continue listening will be surprised by the vivid Christe eleison. This kind of contrast between markedly stretched and downright swift movements pervades the whole Mass (culminating at Cruxificus and Et resurrexit in the Credo section). Long before the historically informed school Scherchen recognized the dancing characters in Bach's music, but he also cherishes intimate contemplation (instead of rushing through one movement after another, as it is usual today). At the surface, this noteworthy recording seems to sound outdated, but to the attentive listener it reveals a stunning modernity and deep insights.

  • mumok vienna live p2

    47

    'architecture and sound' live at the MUMOK vienna.
    Helmut Wolfgruber and Herbert Gollini performing at the museum of modern arts MUMOK vienna, playing the lavastones covering the building to create a musical and unique cosmos of sound.
    recorded live on october 2nd 2010 'Lange Nacht der Museen'

  • Gedichte zur Lage

    3:02

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Gedichte zur Lage · Will Quadflieg · Wiener Singverein · Wiener Symphoniker · Ferdinand Leitner

    Wir entdecken Komponisten: Ludwig van Beethoven – Streit um einen Götterfunken

    ℗ 1985 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Berlin

    Released on: 2017-01-01

    Producer: Lothar Beisenherz
    Studio Personnel, Recording Engineer: Gerd Henjes
    Author: Marei Obladen
    Composer: Ludwig van Beethoven
    Author: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Der Rosenkavalier - Angela Denoke The Marschallins Monologue - James Allen Gähres, cond.

    25:55

    ANGELA DENOKE sings 'The Marschallin's Monologue', Act One of the opera Der Rosenkavalier, Op. 59 by Richard Strauss.

    James Allen Gähres, conductor
    Marschallin: Angela Denoke, soprano
    Octavian: Ute Döring, mezzo-soprano

    Ulm Philharmonic

    Live recorded during open public performance.
    Ulm, Germany
    All rights reserved.

    00:00 Da geht er hin, der aufgeblasene Kerl
    05:36 Ach, du bist wieder da
    09:24 Bis in mein Herz hinein
    11:29 Die Zeit, die ist ein sonderbar Ding
    16:17 Heut oder Morgen
    18:32 Ich werd jetzt in die Kirche gehen
    21:51 Ich hab Ihn nicht einmal gekuesst!

    R. Strauss - Rosenkavalier, Angela Denoke sings 'Hab mirs gelobt' - James Allen Gähres, cond.:

    R. Strauss - Vier letzte Lieder - Angela Denoke - James Allen Gähres, cond.:

    At the age of 47, Richard Strauss was as formidable a modernist as any composer on the Western music scene. His revolutionary tone poems, from Don Juan to Heldenleben, had made him world-famous, and his two operas Salomé (1905) and Elektra (1909) had both shocked and delighted the musical world. While wildly successful, Der Rosenkavalier, which premiered in Dresden on January 26, 1911, was considered by many critics to be a step back, as though Strauss, who had reached the verge of atonality in his previous stage works, had shied back from taking the next step and retreated into the past instead.

    One still occasionally hears this hundred-year-old cliché of Strauss reception, but it is important to emphasize that it rests on a fundamental misconception. Even though Strauss may have made copious allusions to the music of the 18th century - the century in which the action takes place - there is nothing conservative about the opera, in its harmonic idiom or in any other respect. One cannot imagine it being written even ten years earlier. It is just that after composing two tragedies that presented radically new interpretations of ancient stories, Strauss wanted to tackle a subject closer to his own time, one where no one dies for a change. He and his collaborator, the great Austrian poet Hugo von Hofmannsthal who had also written the libretto of Elektra, conjured up the Vienna of Empress Maria Theresa (1740-1780), using that world as a backdrop to a story about timeless topics such as aging, or the differences between nobility of birth and nobility of spirit.

    On February 11, 1909, Hofmannsthal announced to the composer that he had drafted a scenario for a comedy, with colorful action, and opportunities for lyricism, wit, humor and even a brief ballet. Two great roles, one for a baritone and the other for a graceful young girl dressed as a boy... By April, he had delivered the words to the first scene, and Strauss was delighted: Composition will flow like oil... On April 23, Hofmannsthal advised: Come up with an old-fashioned, partly sweet, partly cheeky Viennese waltz for the last act, which will pervade the entire act... (This waltz now begins, famously, in Act II.) In July Strauss demanded, and obtained, a thorough revision of Act II; the plot of that act as we know it today was devised entirely by Strauss. The composer was often unsparing in his criticism, firm and outspoken but always respectful. At one point, he wrote: Don't forget that the audience needs to laugh! Laugh, not just smile and chuckle! Wagner's Meistersinger kept coming up as a constant reference in the correspondence between the co-authors - and in fact, both the Marschallin and Hans Sachs willingly step aside in favor of a young pair of lovers. In both operas, the young male lover also has a ridiculous rival in Beckmesser and Ochs, respectively. The entire score was finished by September 26.

    The role of Octavian was conceived from the start as a trouser role, following the example of Cherubino in Mozart's Marriage of Figaro, another work that obviously served as a model. (Cherubino is also dressed up as a girl at one point.) Yet Cherubino is only a secondary character, while Octavian is the title role; his 'manliness' is established even before the curtain goes up in Act I and remains a key factor throughout the opera. Strauss may have wanted to emphasize Octavian's youthfulness by giving his part to a female singer, but the musical reason for his choice is equally important: he needed equal, intertwining voices when Octavian sang with the Marschallin or with Sophie, and most crucially in the glorious moment involving all three characters at the end of the opera.

    The world premiere of this comedy for music became, as Norman Del Mar put it in his classic three-volume Strauss biography, beyond question the most riotous success that even Strauss had ever had. It immediately entered the regular repertoire of large opera houses around the world. Its popularity has endured without interruption for over a century now and many great singers have built their careers on the roles of the Marschallin, Octavian or Baron Ochs.

  • Korngold - Sextet op. 10 audio + score

    34:04

    Erich Wolfgang Korngold: String Sextet in D major op. 10 (1916)

    00:00 I: Moderato allegro
    10:05 II: Adagio
    20:00 III: Intermezzo (Moderato, con grazia)
    26:47 IV: Finale (Presto)

    Performed by Copenhagen Classic:

    Johannes Søe Hansen, violin
    Arne Balk-Møller, violin
    Katrine Bundgaard, viola
    Ida Speyer Grøn, viola
    Ingemar Brantelid, cello
    Henrik Brendstrup, cello

    Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897-1957) was born in the Moravian city of Brunn then part of the Austrian Habsburg Empire (today Brno in the Czech Republic). He grew up in Vienna where his father was a music critic for one of Vienna’s leading papers. Recognizing his son’s extraordinary talent, Korngold’s father took him to see Mahler when the boy was nine. Mahler declared him a genius and other noteworthy musicians such as Humperdinck and Richard Strauss held that he was the greatest child prodigy since Mozart. Mahler saw to it that Korngold studied with Vienna’s best teachers—–Robert Fuchs, Hermann Grädener and Alexander Zemlinsky. Korngold became one of Europe’s leading operatic and instrumental composers and conductors and subsequently served as a professor of composition at the Vienna Conservatory. In the 1930’s he was invited to Hollywood and thereafter became one of the leading film composers of his time. After 1946, he left the film industry to concentrate on composing absolute music.

    When, at the age of 17, Erich Wolfgang Korngold composed his string sextet he was already a widely recognised and much-admired wonder child in Vienna of his time. Everywhere his work was recived with enthusiasm and the great composers praised his talent unanimously. Mahler called him a genius and Richard Strauss conducted many of his orchestral works.
    Korngold's music was advanced but also melodious and romantic and, contrary to many of his contemporary colleagues in Vienna like e.g. Arnold Schöberg, Korngold held on to this tonal yet harmoniously original way of writing throughout his entire life and career.
    The relationship between Korngold and Schönberg, two very different characters, was further restrained by the fact that Korngold's father was a much feared music critic at DIE PRESSE who led a life-long crusade against the modernism of the so-called New Vienna School of which Schönberg was the most distinguished representative.
    His father's occoupation became something of an obstacle to the son's career and this engendered a fair share of gossip and intrigues, yet still young Korngold's talent was undeniable and he recaped the fruits of his talent rigth until the end of his life and career when he lived in America and wrote film music for Hollywood for which he recived two Acadamy Awards,. Ironically a warm friendship developed in America between Korngold and Schönberg who had also been forced into exile by nazism and WW2.
    Korngold's String Sextet in D Major was completed in 1915 and premiered two years later to great acclaim with critics calling it the finest such work since Brahms. The style is post Brahmsian late romantic. In four movements, Korngold’s operatic talent is foreshadowed almost immediately in the very lyrical and romantic first subject. A calmer melody serves as the second theme. The second movement is an Adagio. It is tinged with sadness and introspection but it is not funereal. Next comes an Intermezzo which in many ways recalls the days of Golden Vienna at the end of the 19th century. The rousing finale alternates between a sense of urgency and a mood of jubilation.

    The use of copyrighted materials is solely for educational purposes. I do not own the content.
    subscribe for new score videos each week

  • Wyklad 2 Arthur Schnitzler – przedstawiciel wiedeńskiego modernizmu

    51:13

  • Great Composers: Igor Stravinsky

    9:32

    A look at one of the 20th century's most versatile masters.

    This was a viewer request from YouTuber jamesaellis. If you've got a question or request for a future video, leave a comment, shoot me a message through YouTube, or use the email/Tumblr links below.

    ----------

    Classical Nerd is a weekly video series covering music history, theoretical concepts, and techniques, hosted by composer, pianist, and music history aficionado Thomas Little.

    ----------

    Music:

    - Igor Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring [piano four-hands], performed by Graziella Concas and Dario Strazzeri
    [free recording courtesy pianosociety.com]
    - Thomas Little: Dance! #2 in E minor, Op. 1 No. 2, performed by Rachel Fellows, Michael King, and Bruce Tippette

    ----------

    Contact Information:

    Questions and comments can be directed to:
    nerdofclassical [at] gmail.com

    Tumblr:
    classical-nerd.tumblr.com

    ----------

    All images and audio in this video are for educational purposes only and are not intended as copyright infringement. If you have a copyright concern, please contact me using the above information.

  • Au Temps de Klimt, la Sécession à Vienne

    3:31

    La Pinacothèque de Paris propose de février à juin 2015 une rétrospective sur la Sécession, ce mouvement fondamental de l’Art Nouveau qui s’est développé à Vienne au début du siècle dernier, dont le chef de file fut Gustav Klimt, et dans lequel l’expressionnisme, courant majeur de l’art moderne, a puisé ses racines. Lire la suite sur artsixMic :

  • BEETHOVEN FRIEZE - Even Up

    4:14

    BEETHOVEN FRIEZE - Even Up

    Official -

    Get CD -

  • x
  • Mahler Unleashed: The Aura of Mahler

    20:20

    Join NEC faculty John Heiss and President Tony Woodcock discuss the NEC Contemporary Ensemble's concert The Aura of Mahler which features a program of works by Mahler, his Viennese modernist contemporaries and successors, and more recent composers who have perpetuated Mahler's aura.
    The concert will be held Tuesday November 15 in NEC's Jordan Hall. For more information about our concert series marking the centennial of Mahler's death please visit:

  • Herb Weidner Valse macabre

    4:06

    Ein Walzer für die Toten und die Lebenden für Klavier in fis-moll op.1281vie. Am Klavier : Herb Weidner. Gemälde von Gustav Klimt Hoffnung.

  • Beethovens 9th Part 1

    8:15

    In a audio/visual preconcert lecture, Richard Gard discusses the New Haven Symphony's upcoming performance of Beethoven's 9th Symphony.

  • Gustav Klimt - Antonio Caldara - HD -

    2:57

    Gustav Klimt (Baumgarten, 14 de julio de 1862 -- Alsergrund, 6 de febrero de 1918) fue un pintor simbolista austríaco, y uno de los más conspicuos representantes del movimiento modernista de la secesión vienesa. Klimt pintó lienzos y murales con un estilo personal muy ornamentado, que también manifestó a través de objetos de artesanía, como los que se encuentran reunidos en la Galería de la Secesión vienesa. Intelectualmente afín a cierto ideario romántico, Klimt encontró en el desnudo femenino una de sus más recurrentes fuentes de inspiración. Antonio Caldara, (Venecia (1670) - Viena, 26 de diciembre de 1736) fue un prolífico compositor italiano, que trabajó inicialmente en Venecia y luego en Barcelona y en Austria. Su obra se sitúa en la transición del Barroco al Barroco tardío. En su etapa final también puede ser considerado como precursor del preclasicismo.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 3. Ruhevoil

    20:15

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 3. Ruhevoil (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • the sex cripples - karls disco wiener haven

    1:32

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 1. Badachtig, Nicht e...

    15:10

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 1. Badachtig, Nicht ellen (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Das Konzert Hermann Bahr: Akademietheater 1964 Teil 7

    10:45

    Das Konzert Hermann Bahr: Akademietheater 1964 Teil 7

    Aufzeichnung aus dem Akademietheater 1964 mit
    Gustav Heink, Pianist - Robert Lindner
    Marie, seine Frau - Susi Nicoletti
    Dr. Franz Jura - Peter Weck
    Delfine, seine Frau - Johanna Matz
    Eva Gerndl - Loni Friedl
    Pollinger - Hugo Gottschlich
    Frau Pollinger- Gusti Wolf
    Regie: Josef Meinrad
    Bühnenbild: Lois Egg
    Kostüme: Erni Kniepert

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - a. Wenn mein Schatz

    4:10

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - a. Wenn mein Schatz (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • museo Belvedere Viena

    2:27

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - d. Die zwei blauen ...

    4:49

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - d. Die zwei blauen Augen (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 2. In gemachlicher Be...

    8:36

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 2. In gemachlicher Bewegung (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - V. A. ...

    13:52

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - V. A. Finale Im tempo de scherzo I (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - b. Ging heut morgeri

    4:05

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - b. Ging heut morgeri (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - I. All...

    21:55

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - I. Allegro maestoso (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - c. Ich hab ein glue...

    2:59

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Songs of a Wayfarer - c. Ich hab ein gluehendes messer (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Pop und Rock Musik 2016 aus Wien

    10:54

    Pop und Rock Musik aus WIEN
    Die Nummer 1 in Wien

  • Kapitel 1: Gedichte

    31

    Provided to YouTube by Kontor New Media GmbH

    Kapitel 1: Gedichte · Egon Schiele & Julian Sharp

    Gedichte

    ℗ Audio Media Digital

    Released on: 2015-02-10

    Artist: Egon Schiele
    Artist, Narrator: Julian Sharp
    Music Publisher: Audio Media Digital
    Lyricist: Egon Schiele

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - II. An...

    9:42

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - II. Andante con moto (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder - e. In diesem Wetter

    6:10

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder - e. In diesem Wetter (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 4. Sehr behaglich

    8:43

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.4 in G major - 4. Sehr behaglich (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - IV. Ur...

    1:41

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C Minor - Resurrection - IV. Urlicht Sehr feierlich aber schlicht (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - IV. Ur...

    20:18

    Gustav Mahler - Mahler - Symphony No.2 in C minor - Resurrection - IV. Urlicht V. Im tempo des scherzo (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

  • Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder - a. Nun will die sonn

    4:37

    Gustav Mahler - Gustav Mahler - Kindertotenlieder - a. Nun will die sonn (performed by unknown)

    Gustav Mahler (German pronunciation: [???staf ?ma?l?]; 7 July 1860 -- 18 May 1911) was a late-Romantic Austrian composer and one of the leading conductors of his generation. A Jew, he was born in the village of Kalischt, Bohemia, in what was then the Austrian Empire, now Kališt? in the Czech Republic. His family later moved to nearby Iglau (now Jihlava), where Mahler grew up. As a composer, Mahler acted as a bridge between the 19th-century Austro-German tradition and the modernism of the early 20th century. While in his lifetime his status as a conductor was established beyond question, his own music gained wide popularity only after periods of relative neglect which included a ban on its performance in much of Europe during the Nazi era. After 1945 the music was discovered and championed by a new generation of listeners; Mahler then became a frequently performed and recorded composer, a position he has sustained into the 21st century. Born in humble circumstances, Mahler displayed his musical gifts at an early age. After graduating from the Vienna Conservatory in 1878, he held a succession of conducting posts of rising importance in the opera houses of Europe, culminating in his appointment in 1897 as director of the Vienna Court Opera (Hofoper). During his ten years in Vienna, Mahler experienced regular opposition and hostility from the anti-Semitic press. Nevertheless, his innovative productions and insistence on the highest performance standards ensured his reputation as one of the greatest of opera conductors, particularly as an interpreter of the stage works of Wagner and Mozart. Late in his life he was briefly director of New York's Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic. Mahler's œuvre is relatively small; for much of his life composing was necessarily a part-time activity while he earned his living as a conductor, but he devoted as much time as he could to his compositions, faithfully reserving his summer months for intense periods of creative concentration, supplemented as time permitted during his active concert seasons with the tasks of editing and orchestrating his expansive works. Aside from early works such as a movement from a piano quartet composed when he was a student in Vienna, Mahler's works are designed for large orchestral forces, symphonic choruses and operatic soloists. Most of his twelve symphonic scores are very large-scale works, often employing vocal soloists and choruses in addition to augmented orchestral forces. These works were often controversial when first performed, and several were slow to receive critical and popular approval; exceptions included his Symphony No. 2, Symphony No. 3, and the triumphant premiere of his Eighth Symphony in 1910. Some of Mahler's immediate musical successors included the composers of the Second Viennese School, notably Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg and Anton Webern. Shostakovich and Benjamin Britten are among later 20th-century composers who admired and were influenced by Mahler. The International Gustav Mahler Institute was established in 1955, to honour the composer's life and work.

Shares

x

Check Also

Menu