This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Playlist of The Evolution Of West Coast Rap [1983

x
  • desc

    East Coast Rap Vs. West Coast Rap

    10:35

    East Coast Hip-Hop Vs. West Coast Hip-Hop.

    We are comparing both styles without restarting the East Coast West Coast beef

    The East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry was a feud from 1991 to 1997 between artists and fans of the East Coast hip hop and West Coast hip hop scenes in the United States, especially from 1994 to 1997. Focal points of the feud were East Coast-based rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (and his New York-based label, Bad Boy Records) and West Coast-based rapper Tupac Shakur (and his Los Angeles-based label, Death Row Records), who became symbols of the East Coast/West Coast feud. #hiphopuniverse #hiphopcomparisons

    As it was originally known, hip hop was a movement in New York City in the late 1970s and early 1980s. It revolved around four key areas: MCing (now known as rapping), DJing, graffiti art and b-boying (breakdancing).

    While all four areas were important, the two that we will focus on are MCing and DJing, as they have the most relevance to both to audio and hip hop.

    Hip hop’s roots come from a DJ scratching a record to create a looped beat while an MC raps along to the beat. While much has changed over the years, the essential idea of rapping to a looped beat is still the foundation for most hip hop songs. Many music producers still follow these old techniques, loading up an old soul record and creating a new track.

    However, hip hop advanced beyond this in 1983 when Afrika Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force began using synthesizers and drum machines to create entirely new tracks.

    While there is much that took place along with this, and many artists such as Run-DMC, LL Cool J and others helped to define the genre, let’s fast-forward to 1987.

    In 1987, in Compton, CA, an important move was taking place. Where previously hip hop had been politically and socially motivated, a new sub-genre was forming: gangsta rap. A group known as N.W.A., consisting of Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Ice Cube and Eazy-E released an album titled “Straight Outta Compton.” Dr. Dre provided the production for the album, consisting almost entirely of rolling basslines and drums.

    Straight Outta Compton was a smashing hit. While the group eventually disbanded over financial disputes, N.W.A.’s legacy would help shape the future.

    Dr. Dre would later sign with Suge Knight’s Death Row Records, along with an up-and coming rapper named Tupac Shakur, ushering in the era of West Coast Gangsta Rap. Dre remains quite influential in the industry today, widely recognized as a pioneer in hip hop and music production.

    Meanwhile, back on the East Coast, a similar movement was happening. Perhaps most notable was Sean “Puffy” Combs’ departure from Uptown Records, taking newly signed rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (Biggie) with him to found Bad Boy Records.
    Bad Boy Records was competing with Suge Knight’s West Coast powerhouse D*ath Row Records.

    This, while not immediately, would lead to the downfall of gangsta rap as a genre, and move hip hop into the popular music genre where it remains today.

    Let’s end the history lesson here. There is much more that could be said, with artists along the way that I have overlooked, but this is just meant to be a brief outline to provide context. Additionally, the closer we move to our present time, the harder it becomes to analyze the music from a historical standpoint.

    Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Support us on Patreon:

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

  • desc

    Top 10 Hip hop 1983

    7:47

    Disfruten de este top musical con 10 canciones de Hip hop de 1983.
    Las imagenes y el contenido multimedia utilizados en este video son propiedad de sus respectivos autores.
    Siganme en mis redes sociales:
    Facebook:
    Twitter:
    Google+:

    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use

  • x
  • desc

    Hip Hop History - West Coast

    4:05

    West Coast's famous rappers of all times...

  • desc

    West Coast Rappers Vs. East Coast Rappers

    4:26

  • x
  • desc

    The Evolution of N.W.A.

    3:48

    Like & Subscribe For More Also Hit That Notification Bell
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Intro - Kendrick Lamar - HUMBLE.

    Outro - R. Kelly - I'm A Flirt
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ➡Social Media⬅

    Twitter ➡

    Instagram ➡

    Business Email ➡ Officialkingwil24@gmail.com
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ➡Gaming⬅

    PSN ➡ Therealkingwil24

    Gaming Channel (Flygod) ➡

    Twitch ➡

  • desc

    The Evolution Of Hip-Hop 1979 - 2017

    30:00

    Evolution Of Rap, Best Rap Song Of Each Year.

    Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe.

    Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today.

    In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it.

    Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans.

    “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today.

    People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow.

    Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced.

    People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists.

    Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category.

    Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say.

    Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think?

    #hiphopuniverse #evolutionofhiphop

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Support us on Patreon:

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

  • x
  • desc

    Best Rap/Hip Hop Songs of the 80s

    16:00

    All the biggest hip hop songs from the first generation of hip hop 1979-1984, titles of songs are in the video.

  • desc

    Gangsta Rap

    1:03

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Gangsta Rap · 45 Grave

    A Devil's Possessions - Demos & Live 1980-1983

    ℗ 2008 Cleopatra Records

    Released on: 2008-02-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • desc

    A Quick 12 Min. History of Gangster Rap Music: From Then To Now

    12:32






    One of our subscribers requested we do a video on the history of gangster rap, which sent me on a quest to find the very first rapper to arguably be considered Gangster. Because if we're going to do a history of video, then we gotta to have a place to start.

    In this video we give a quick 12 min. breakdown of the history of gangster rap, we go all the way from the 80s with rappers like Schooly D and Ice T to rappers of today. Grab a drink and snacks and enjoy,

  • x
  • desc

    The Evolution Of Diss Tracks 1986 - 2018

    12:00

    Evolution Of Diss Songs & The Best Diss Song Every Year

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop. Nothing says rap better than a good feud!
    What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on Rapper's Delight, MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years.

    Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle.

    The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl.

    The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us.

    I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed.

    Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever.
    #hiphopuniverse #evolutionofhiphop

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Official Hip-Hop Universe Merchandise:

    Outro (prod. by Phat Crispy):

    Support us on Patreon:

    ___________________________

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

    Instagram:

  • desc

    THE HISTORY OF L.A. RAP RECORDS PART 1 - FOUNDATION LESSON #35 - JAYQUAN

    1:1:49

    JayQuan methodically & chronologically examines the history of L.A. rap recordings. Written, narrated, edited & lived by JayQuan.


  • desc

    New Mix: Various West Coast Hip-hop Artists - West Coast Hip-hop

    1:12:49

    Listen to a new 70-minute West Coast hip-hop mix featuring music by Problem, Ty Dolla $ign, Kurupt, Cassie Veggies, Mozzy, CashLord Mess, E-40, Juicy J, 2Pac, Rick Rock, Snoop Dogg, Nipsey Hussle, YG, Nef The Pharaoh, Philthy Rich, The Jacka, The Conscious Daughters, Beeda Weeda, J-Stalin, Blueface, Keak Da Sneak, Young Jeezy and more...

  • desc

    OFFICIAL WEST COAST RAP HISTORY documentary

    9:59

    CAPT. RAPP, RONNIE HUDSON, DJ FLASH, RICH CASON, MC FOSTY,DR. DRE, KID FROST, ICE T, DJ FLASH , SNOOP DOGG, L.A. DREAM TEAM, EGYPTIAN LOVER...THE TRUE HISTORY OF WEST COAST RAP

  • desc

    La evolución de Ice-T | De 1983 a 1998, de 25 años a 40

    11:13

    Uno de los mejores y uno de los primeros del Gangsta Rap

  • desc

    The Evolution Of JAY-Z 1986 - 2017

    20:00

    The Evolution Of JAY-Z.

    Shawn Corey Carter (born December 4, 1969), known professionally as Jay-Z (stylized as JAY-Z) is an American rapper and businessman. He is one of the best-selling musicians of all time, having sold more than 100 million records, while receiving 21 Grammy Awards for his music.

    MTV ranked him the Greatest MC of all time in 2006.
    Rolling Stone ranked three of his albums—Reasonable Doubt (1996), The Blueprint (2001), and The Black Album (2003)—among The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. In 2017, Forbes estimated his net worth at $810 million, making him the second-richest hip hop artist in the U.S.

    As an artist, Jay-Z holds the record for most number one albums by a solo artist on the US Billboard 200 with 14. He has also had four number ones on the Billboard Hot 100, one (Empire State of Mind) as lead artist. In 2009, he was ranked the tenth-most successful artist of the 2000s by Billboard as well as the fifth top solo male artist and fourth top rapper behind Eminem, Nelly, and 50 Cent. He was also ranked the 88th-greatest artist of all time by Rolling Stone.

    Jay-Z owns the New York 40/40 Club sports bar, and is the co-creator of the clothing line Rocawear. He is the former president of Def Jam Recordings, co-founder of Roc-A-Fella Records, and the founder of the entertainment company Roc Nation. He also founded the sports agency Roc Nation Sports and is a certified NBA and MLB sports agent.

    Jay-Z married singer Beyoncé in 2008. As a couple, they have an estimated combined net worth of $1.16 billion.

    #hiphopuniverse #evolutionofhiphop

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Support us on Patreon:

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

  • x
  • desc

    TOP 10 WEST COAST RAPPERS

    10:00

    MY TOP 10 WEST COAST RAPPERS

  • desc

    Gangsta Rap - MTV Hip-Hop Documentary 1996

    25:42

    MTV aired this documentary about Gangsta Rap in 1996.

    They interviewed 6 different hip-hop fans from across America to hear their views on Gangsta Rap.

    As well as the fans MTV also interviewed the biggest rappers of the time such as Tupac, Snoop, Onyx & Eazy-E.

    I do not own the copyright for this tv show. This video is for historical preservation only.

  • desc

    EAST COAST RAP VS WEST COAST RAP

    2:19

    I compare the two of the most influential regions in rap. Just because one of the coasts won doesn't mean I don't listen to the other coast.

    If you disagree, it's my opinion. Relax.

  • desc

    WestCoast Underground Hip Hop Mix New School n Some Old Skool

    1:6:25

  • desc

    Star Studded Strutters Neckwork 1983

    7:49

    The first rap record I produced. I just found out that an old friend Ushy Eron had died several years ago. So I thought I would post a record I produced for his label back in 1983. Ushy was a DJ in the Dallas area and a pioneer of Hip Hop culture in that part of the country. This track is from his group the Star Studded Stutters. “Neckwork” was a regional hit in the south with some east and west coast penetration. I played all the tracks except for keyboards which were done by Mr. Wayne Stallings from the MCA recording act “ZOOM”. If you are not familiar with this group search You Tube for “Love Seasons”, really a great song. Anyway I remember I was in Dallas to pick up two new guitars from Tokai Guitars, which I had agreed to sign an endorsement deal with. So I picked up the guitars and went directly over to the studio and recoded this track. The guitar I played was an experimental aluminum body guitar with a wood neck. It sounded like SHIT!!!! All treble all the time!!! But I tried to make it work even though I was fighting the lack of tone. Anyway, I recorded and mixed the track in an afternoon and it was released about a month later. This was my first rap record, and I didn’t want to do it, back then I didn’t think much of rap or rappers. I thought they couldn’t sing or play any instruments so they really weren’t recording artists. But I promised Ushy I would help him so I just wanted to quickly lay the tracks and get out of there. That was quite evident if you bought the record and noticed that the “B” side of the 12” was just and instrumental of the track with me soloing constantly for about eight minutes! Lol R.I.P. Ushy.

  • x
  • desc

    The Evolution of Scarface

    10:31

    Like & Subscribe For More

    Twitter -

    Instagram -

    Jaden Smith - ICON

    Outro - Aaliyah - Rock The Boat

  • desc

    Hip Hop History mix vol.2

    1:18:45

    For my personal contribution to the black history month, here's the second compilation from my own anthology on the history of Hip Hop music, with 600 tracks on 30 albums (1979-2002) ; this is the volume 2, with some Hip Hop classics straight out of year 1983 to 1984 ; what we gonna do here is go back, way back in time ; this is how it all started, check this out yo ; this compilation is dedicated to the black people, the afro-american people, and to all of my neggahz around the world who listen to my rap/Hip Hop music compilations, to my real Hip Hop headz you know what I'm sayin' ; I just wanna say Peace to all my black brothaz, I love you so much . Have a nice black history month everyone, 1 Luv . Tracklist :







    01-Dr. JECKYLL & Mr HYDE - Gettin' Money (1983) 7:24 0 16
    02-FRESH 3 M.C.'s - Fresh [1983] 6:10 0
    03-TREACHEROUS THREE - Get Up (1983) 6:01 0
    04-JIMMY SPENCER - Dollar bill ya (1983) 2:11 0
    05-WEST STREET MOB - Break Dance - Electric Boogie (1983) 5:06 0
    06-GLOBE & WHIZ KID - Play that beat Mr Dj (1983) 3:00 0
    07-CRASH CREW - On the radio (1983) 2:56 0
    08-ROCK MASTER SCOTT & The DYNAMIC THREE - Request Line (1984)) 6:47 0 3
    09-MASTER O.C. And KRAZY EDDIE ft. PESO,TITO & MAIN ATTRACT - Masters Of The Scratch (1984) 5:28 0 2
    10-MAN PARRISH ft. FREEZE FORCE - Boogie Down Bronx (1984) 5:10 0
    11-ALEX & The CITY CREW - Say What, Say Who [1984] Beat Box 12 5:26 0 3
    12-THE FAT BOYS - Jailhouse Rap (1984) 8:29 0 3
    13-WHODINI - Five Minutes Of Funk (1984) 5:23 0 6
    14-WHODINI - Freaks Come Out At Night (1984) 4:41 0 3
    15-WHODINI - Friends (1984) 4:30 0 4







    2019 Ill rec music compilations
    (Independent and free-form music)







    .

  • desc

    Top 5 West Coast Rap Crews/Groups

    8:54

    My list of Top 5 West Coast Crews
    5. Tha Dogg Pound - Serial Killa
    4. Outlawz - Real Talk
    3. Compton's Most Wanted - Hood Took Me Unda
    2. Westside Connection - Bow Down
    1. N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton

    SORRY FOR FUCKING UP NUMBER 3 AND 4...

    All rights (of the music) goes to the owner.
    Video made by Marlons Records ^^

  • desc

    Top 100 West Coast 90s Rap Albums

    55:01

    Tribute to the greatest era in Hip Hop! My personal list if you agree/disagree leave some feedback, enjoy!

  • desc

    MTV Rapomentary

    24:00

    MTV documentary on the history of hip-hop, from its early days up to 1991.

  • desc

    The Evolution of Hip Hop

    16:24

    Mumble Rap, Emo-Rap, Old School, Lyricism, Singers in Hip-Hop
    Who's real in the game?



    Music by Aaron Pharaoh

  • desc

    Gangsta Rap Mix / Hip-Hop Classics / West Coast Rap

    2:18:25

    Gangsta Rap Mix by DJ Vanilla

  • desc

    Best Rap Beats Of Each Year 1979 - 2018

    19:30

    Best Rap Beats Of Each Year.

    The best Hip-Hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. The beats are the main components of a good rap song. Today I will present you the best rap beats from 1979 until the year 2018.
    #hiphopuniverse #evolutionofhiphop

    I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed.

    Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever.

    Producers:
    1979: Slyvia Robinson
    1980: J.B. Moore
    1981: Sylvia Robinson
    1982: Arthur Baker // Song 2: ‎Sylvia Robinson
    1983: Russell Simmons
    1984: Larry Smith
    1985: Rick Rubin
    1986: Russell Simmons & Rick Rubin
    1987: Eric B. // Song 2: L.A. Posse
    1988: Marley Marl // Song 2: Dr. Dre
    1989: Dr. Dre // Song 2: EPMD
    1990: Q-Tip // Song 2: Al Eaton
    1991: Q-Tip // Song 2: Kay Gee & Naughty By Nature
    1992: Dr. Dre // Song 2: DJ Muggs
    1993: Dr. Dre // Song 2: RZA
    1994: Easy Mo Bee // Song 2: Dj Premier
    1995: Havoc // Song 2: Dr. Dre
    1996: Clark Kent // Song 2: Johnny J
    1997: Ron Amen-Ra Lawrence, Puff Daddy & Deric D-Dot Angelettie // Song 2: Deric D-Dot Angelettie & Puff Daddy
    1998: Ron Amen-Ra Lawrence & Deric D-Dot Angelettie // Song 2: ‎Dj Shock
    1999: Dr. Dre // Song 2: Timbaland
    2000: DR Period // Song 2: Earthtone III
    2001: Timbaland // Song 2: KLC
    2002: Luis Resto, Jeff Bass & Eminem // Song 2: The Neptunes
    2003: Dr. Dre‎; ‎Mike Elizondo // Song 2: Swizz Beatz
    2004: Dr. Dre‎, ‎Mike Elizondo // Song 2: Scott Storch
    2005: Play-N-Skillz // Song 2: Scott Storch
    2006: EMINEM // Song 2: J.R. Rotem
    2007: Dangerous LLC // Song 2:‎ Polow da Don
    2008: Bangladesh // Song 2: Mr. Collipark & Jim Jonsin
    2009: Will.i.am // Song 2: Kid Cudi & Dot Da Genius
    2010: Kanye West // Song 2: Stargate
    2011: Kanye West // Song 2: Boi-1daShebib
    2012: Jahlil Beats // Song 2: Young Chop
    2013: Mike Zombie // Song 2: DVLP, Filthy
    2014: Jahlil Beats // Song 2: Phonix Beats, J. Cole
    2015: Pharrell Williams // Song 2: Travis Scott, Eestbound & WondaGurl
    2016: Metro Boomin // Song 2: Menace (UK)
    2017: TM88 & JW Lucas // Song 2: Metro Boomin & 21 Savage
    2018: Cardo, Yung Exclusive & Boi-1da // Song 2: Valentino Khan & Diplo

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Official Hip-Hop Universe Merchandise:

    Outro (prod. by Phat Crispy):

    Support us on Patreon:

    ___________________________

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

    Instagram:

  • desc

    THE BLUEPRINT - KURTIS BLOW PART 1- FOUNDATION LESSON #46-JAYQUAN

    1:20:11

    JayQuan does an in-depth analysis of Kurtis Blows' history and discography. Produced,narrated ,written,edited and lived by JayQuan.



  • desc

    Eazy-E - The Making of The Boyz N The Hood 1986

    6:41

    Eazy-E - The Making of The Boyz-N-Hood 1986, Straight Outta Compton Movie,1-900-2-COMPTON,Eazy-E Music Artist,
    eazyelegacy.org,EazyE.Org,Ruthlessmutha, Sergioz Remix, Eazy-E, Eazy-E,Douggy Dougg, Hologram, CPT,Compton, N.W.A.,NWA,nwa, Tomica Wright, Jerry Heller, Ruthless Records, Lil Eazy-E, MC Ren, DJ Yella, Ice Cube, Dr Dre, Suge Knight, 2pac, Tupac, Mister D, Sleepy Malo, Southland Gangsters, Chicano Rap, California, Cali, West Coast, Westcoast, Crip, Crips, crip, crips,G, G's,G'z, Gangsters, Gangsta, Bone Thugs N Harmony, N'land Clique, LSD, eazye, eazy-e, westcoastpioneer, westcoastpioneers, kelly park crips, G-Funk, g funk, g-funk,old school rap, Old School Rap, old school hip hop, Old School Hip Hop, hip hop, Hip Hop,OMD, DTTX, OldSchoolWestCoastGFunk, gangsta rap, Mr Shadow, BG Knocc Out, Dresta, DJ Pooh,, DJ Quik, Bloods Crips, Kurupt, Westside Connection, Coolio, Spice1, Tupac, 2pac, Ice Cube, Eastsidaz, X-raided, Brotha Lynch, Lil Rob, Snoop Dogg, Ant Banks, Kausion, Madogg, Above the Law, Kid Frost, Slow Pain, Mr Criminal, Chicano Rap, Brown Pride, The Chronic, Doggystyle, Madd CJ Mac, Mack 10, Dazzie Dee, Akwid, Aztec Tribe, Brownside, Cbo, Cali Life Style, Celly Cel, Triple C, Central Coast Clique, CMW, Compton Most Wanted, Coolio, Cypress Hill, DBA Flip, Da Brat, Lench Mob, Damu,Deuce Mob, Battlecat, Dove Shack, DPG, DPGC, Dr Dre, Dru Down, Dukes Click, e40, Eastside Clic, Eazy E, EPMD, 187 Fac, 18th Street, 3xKrazy, 5th Ward Boyz Juviniles, 2nd II None, Zapp & Roger, Young Sicc, Xzibit, Wicked Minds, Watts Gangstas, Warren G, Vontel, Volume 10, VMF, Underground Rebellion, UGK, Tha Twinz, Tweedy Bird Loc, Too Short, Thug Life, Threat, Three 6 Mafia, Tha Mistahs, Tha Alkoholics, Tha Liks, Swoop G, Suga Free, Str8 G, SPM, SPanish Fly, South Central Cartel, SCC, Slick Dogg, Sicx, SA Criminals, Royal T, Rodney O and Joe Cooley, Richie Rich, Rhyme Poetic Mafia, Redman, Real Half Pint, RBL Posse, Ras Kas, Rappin 4 Tay, Proper Dos, Parliament Funkadelic, Paperboy, ODM, ODB, OFI, Biggie, Notorious BIG,Norwalk's Most Wanted, Nino Brow, Neighborhood Clicc, New Breed Of Hu$tlas, Nationwide Rip Ridaz, Nate Dogg, N2Deep, N'Land Clique, NWA, Murder Squad, Mr X, Mr Lil One, Mr. Short Khop,Ese Rich Roc, Fat Joe, Flexx, Fo Clips, Foesume, Frank V, Frost, Funkdoobiest, Gelo, G'edUp Gangsters, G'fellas, G'len, Gangsta Ern, Gangsta Rhyme Posse, Ganksta C, Geto Boys, Gospel Gangstas, GPA, Havoc & Prodeje, Jayo Felony, Junebug Slim, Kam, Kausion, Knightowl, Kozme, LV, LA Nash, LAZ, Lady of Rage, Latin Bomb Squad, LBC Crew, Lighter Shade of Brown, ALSOB, Lil Half Dead, Mac Mall, Masta Ace Incorporated, MC Breed, MC Ren, MC Eiht, Mr Happs, -bloods, crips, gangs, violence, gangsta, shooting, tupac, 2pac, eazy, snoop, compton, ghetto, hood, fighting, ms13, los, angeles, dogg, la, Gangster Rap, Gangsta Rap, N.W.A (Musical Artist), Gangsta Rap (Musical Genre), Eazy-E (Musical Artist)

  • desc

    West Coast

    4:00

    Provided to YouTube by CDBaby

    West Coast · DRUPEY

    Y'all Know Me

    ℗ 2003 M.O.B. Productions

    Released on: 2003-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • desc

    The Evolution of Kool G Rap

    15:17

    Like & Subscribe For More

    Twitter -

    Instagram -

    Intro - 2Pac - Old School

    Outro - The Notorious B.I.G - Unbelievable

  • desc

    Top 10 Hip Hop Groups

    10:00

    Turn off the radio.

  • desc

    Rhetoric ~ Virgin Raper 1987 rehearsal

    3:43

  • desc

    1979 -1984 OLD SCHOOL HIP HOP BLOCK PARTY MIX by DJ TNT SOUNDS

    1:40:22

  • desc

    The Evolution Of EMINEM 1988 - 2017

    10:00

    The Evolution of EMINEM, comparing the old EMINEM with the new.

    Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), known professionally as EMINEM, is an American rapper, songwriter, record producer, and actor.

    EMINEM is the best-selling artist of the 2000s in the United States. Throughout his career, he has had 10 number-one albums on the Billboard 200 and five number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100. With US sales of 47.4 million albums and 42 million tracks as of June 2014, EMINEM is the second best-selling male artist of the Nielsen SoundScan era, the sixth best-selling artist in the United States and the best-selling hip-hop artist. Globally, he has sold more than 172 million albums, making him one of the world's best-selling artists. Rolling Stone ranked him 83rd on its list of 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, calling him the King of Hip Hop.

    After his debut album Infinite (1996) and the Slim Shady EP (1997), EMINEM signed with Dr. Dre's Aftermath Entertainment and subsequently achieved mainstream popularity in 1999 with The Slim Shady LP, which earned him his first Grammy Award for Best Rap Album. His next two releases, 2000's The Marshall Mathers LP and 2002's The EMINEM Show, were worldwide successes, with each being certified diamond in U.S. sales, and both winning Best Rap Album Grammy Awards—making EMINEM the first artist to win the award for three consecutive LPs. They were followed by Encore in 2004, another critical and commercial success. EMINEM went on hiatus after touring in 2005, releasing Relapse in 2009 and Recovery in 2010. Both won Grammy Awards and Recovery was the best-selling album of 2010 worldwide, the second time he had the international best-selling album of the year (after The EMINEM Show). EMINEM's eighth album, 2013's The Marshall Mathers LP 2, won two Grammy Awards, including Best Rap Album; it expanded his record for the most wins in that category and his Grammy total to 15.

    EMINEM has developed other ventures, including Shady Records, with manager Paul Rosenberg, which helped launch the careers of artists such as 50 Cent. EMINEM has also established his own channel, Shade 45, on Sirius XM Radio. In November 2002, he starred in the hip hop film 8 Mile, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, for Lose Yourself, becoming the first rap artist to ever win the award. EMINEM has made cameo appearances in the films The Wash (2001), Funny People (2009), The Interview (2014) and the television series Entourage (2010).

    #hiphopuniverse #evolutionofhiphop

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Support us on Patreon:

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

  • desc

    My G Rap Called West Coast Life.wmv

    3:08

    Is a cool rap i made forall da g's out dere lol yeh n i was bored like comment n subscribe thanx.

  • desc

    MIAMI BASS MOVIE The Bass That Ate Miami Full Movie

    2:14:15

    Produced by: Alex Weir, Chris Walton, Scott Libengood, and Rick Sosa.
    Dreamhouse Studios and Cut It Up Def Entertainment are excited to announce the debut of their latest creation, The Bass That Ate Miami, The Foundation. This independent documentary is based on the evolution of music in South Florida and the untold story of the hip hop genre known as Miami Bass. South Florida artists, producers and music executives helped evolve this sound into its own unique hip hop dance genre. Miami Bass dominated the airwaves and car speakers from the mid 1980's to the mid 1990's. The Miami Bass sound continues to influence many of today's hottest artists.

    As hip hop grew and took over different regions of the U.S.; South Florida gave birth to a new style of hip hop that most people don't realize evolved there. The fast, bass heavy drum beats that are used in pop culture today were created on the street corners of South Florida with huge speakers and massive street parties.

    The documentary features segments on Kraftwerk, Electro-Funk, breakdancing, turntableism, drum machine programming (the 808 & the SP1200), the process of record making, car audio exhibitions and of course high energy dance moves.

    Some of the main creators of this genre are interviewed including; Afrika Bambaataa (The God Father of Hip Hop), Pretty Tony (The Inventor of Freestyle), Mr. Mixx (One of the Forefathers of Bass), Jim Jonsin, Afro-Rican, Dynamix II and many more producers, deejay's & artists from the old school to new school.

  • desc

    EAST COAST MELANESIA-Dust Evolution

    3:55

    SALAM HANGAT DARI TIMUR INDONESIA

    Instagram @whisnu.i.yudha

    Harap bantuan dukungan ke channel kami dengan SUBSCRIBE & SHARE ke sosmed teman-teman agar bisa di dengarkan sama yang lainnya.
    Terimakasih






    #DustEvolution #L3D #PapuaRap

  • desc

    East Coast Rap vs West Coast Rap vs Midwest Rap vs Southern Rap Pt 1

    3:14

    I compare East Coast Rap, West Coast Rap, Midwest Rap and Southern Rap.
    I do not own the rights to any music used in this video.

  • desc

    Best Rapper Of Each Year 1979 - 2018

    10:00

    Best Rapper Each Year, The Best Rappers Of All Time.

    Rap fans tend to get into arguments with other rap fans, and it doesn't take much more than someone declaring their Favorite Rapper. Your favorite rapper is a personal preference, one that requires the most subjective defenses. If you’re rooting for the rookie of the year or a washed-up veteran experiencing a career resurgence or someone no one has heard of as your favorite, then so be it. The choice is yours.

    The favorite rapper discussion is cool and all, but the coveted distinction in hip-hop is still being named the GOAT (Greatest of All Time). Rookies and new jacks need not apply—this debate is strictly for the catalog artists, people who have shifted the culture in previously unmovable ways, artists whose music has permeated and resonated over an extended period of time. It’s rap’s imaginary Hall of Fame, existing only within the abstract conversations we have about it.

    But there is one debate that every rap fan not only loves to have but ought to have. A debate that considers both the short-term and long-term implications of an artist’s impact. A debate that pits a rapper in their prime against any and all competitors. A debate that gawks at the cultural landscape and plucks out the one who stands alone: the debate about who is the Best Rapper Alive. Being the BRA is sort of like being the MVP—even though rap doesn’t follow a rigid cultural calendar quite like major sports seasons—because it only requires looking at the current crop of active artists and picking a winner. You can confidently declare the Best Rapper Alive in any given year without having to consider previous decades, the same way you can say LeBron is an MVP even though you’ve never seen Jerry West play.

    Anyone can become the Best Rapper Alive. Some came out the gate with next-level rhymes that had everyone running back to the lab; for others it was a culmination of their gifts that coalesced for one great year. Much like rap itself, it’s an evolving process. But one thing we know for sure, it’s more about a general feeling among fans rather than any discernible facts. (What facts? It’s all just opinion anyway.) When a rapper steps in front of a microphone, and everyone in hip-hop has no choice but to look their way and give props, well then, they just might be the Best Rapper Alive.

    It’s still important to consider that the Best Rapper Alive debate is different from the GOAT conversation. Being the BRA doesn’t mean you’re the biggest or the most successful; it just means you're the Best at one particular moment. Of course in hip-hop, being the best is intrinsically about being BIG. And being at your best doesn’t make you the best, so if your prime coincides with someone else’s, well, hey, there’s always next year.

    You can look back on the hip-hop terrain with 20/20 hindsight, tally up the votes, and declare the GOATs, but the Best Rapper Alive from year to year is a feeling in the moment. There have been debates among rap fans living in that moment since the early days of hip-hop, but those discussions have never been properly cataloged—until now! (Yeah, we're excited. Sue us.) So the question remains: Who got the props?

    #hiphopuniverse #evolutionofhiphop

    Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Official Hip-Hop Universe Merchandise:

    Support us on Patreon:

    ___________________________

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

    Instagram:

  • desc

    Old School Rap Vs. New School Rap

    10:00

    Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop 6.

    Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. #hiphopuniverse #hiphopcomparisons

    Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today.

    In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it.

    Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans.

    “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today.

    People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow.

    Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced.

    People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists.

    Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category.

    Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say.

    Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think?

    Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Official Hip-Hop Universe Merchandise:

    Support us on Patreon:

    ___________________________

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

    Instagram:

  • desc

    Scratch

    1:27:48

    You may also like Bomb It the graffiti documentary:

    A feature-length documentary film about hip-hop DJing, otherwise known as turntablism. From the South Bronx in the 1970s to San Francisco now, the world's best scratchers, beat-diggers, party-rockers, and producers wax poetic on beats, breaks, battles, and the infinite possibilities of vinyl.

    'Scratch is a documentary film, directed and edited by Doug Pray. The film explores the world of the hip-hop DJ. From the birth of hip-hop, when pioneering DJ's began extending breaks on their party records (which helped inspire break dancing and rap), to the invention of scratching and beat-juggling vinyl, to its more recent explosion as a musical movement called turntablism, it's a story of unknown underdogs and serious virtuosos who have radically changed the way we hear, play and create music.The documentary opens with Grand Wizard Theodore (New York) telling the story of how he first introduced scratching. Throughout the documentary, several artists explain how they were introduced to the field of hip-hop and scratch while providing stories and anecdotes of their personal experiences.


    The media material presented in this production is protected by the FAIR USE CLAUSE of the U.S. Copyright Act of 1976, which allows for the rebroadcast of copyrighted materials for the purposes of commentary, criticism, and education.

  • desc

    Old School Rap Vs. New School Rap

    10:00

    Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Part 7.

    Hip-Hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe.
    #hiphopuniverse #hiphopcomparisons

    Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today.

    In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it.

    Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans.

    “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today.

    People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow.

    Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced.

    People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists.

    Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category.

    Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say.

    Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think?

    Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Official Hip-Hop Universe Merchandise:

    Outro (prod. by Phat Crispy):

    Support us on Patreon:

    ___________________________

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

    Instagram:

  • desc

    Old School Rap Vs. New School Rap

    10:00

    Best Rap Songs, Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Part 8.

    Hip-Hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe.
    #hiphopuniverse #hiphopcomparisons

    Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today.

    In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it.

    Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans.

    “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today.

    People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow.

    Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced.

    People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists.

    Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category.

    Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say.

    Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think?

    Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist:


    ___________________________

    Official Hip-Hop Universe Merchandise:

    Outro (prod. by Phat Crispy):

    Support us on Patreon:

    ___________________________

    Facebook:

    Twitter:

    Instagram:

  • desc

    The Best Gangster Movie Lyrics | Genius News

    6:44

    There is a long history of gangster movies influencing hip-hop culture, whether it’s rapper names, album titles, music videos, or lyrical references. There are four films which have cemented their place in hip-hop and pop culture in general: Francis Ford Coppola’s 'The Godfather,' Martin Scorsese’s 'Goodfellas,' Brian De Palma’s 'Scarface,' and the lesser known 'The King of New York,' directed by Abel Ferrara.

    Read more on Genius:

    CREDITS
    Tia Hill, Producer
    Jer Paulin, Writer/Shooter/Editor
    Hillary Crosley Coker, Senior Producer

    Subscribe to Genius:
    Genius on Twitter:
    Genius on Instagram:
    Genius on Facebook:


    #GeniusNews #KingofNewYork #Scarface #TheGodfather #Goodfellas

  • desc

    East Coast - Top 20 East Coast Rappers

    9:58

    #Jay-Z#Old-School#EastCost

  • desc

    Only on The WestCoast Ft Danny G & MuneeBoy

    2:41

    New track called Only On The West Coast ft. Danny G & Munee Boy off of The 9th Letter Mixtape

  • desc

    Knight Chronicles West Coast HHH Part 1 of 7

    21:04

    Knight Chronicles West Coast Holy Hip Hop is a collection of footage captured by producer/artist I-Knight of Boundless Recordz that spans over the past 5-8 years. This project was originally due to be released on DVD, however, the project took an unexpected turn and has been designated to be released (Free) on Youtube and Godtube. This project has been years in the making, that is why you will see information directing you to Myspace. Each artist has since moved to Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. This project is archived footage from Knight-Vizion Labs and Boundless Recordz and is meant to bring you behind the scenes of what some call the new underground that is Holy Hip Hop or Christian or Gospel rap. For further info Like us at Facebook.com/iknightmuzik or Twitter.com/djiknight

  • desc

    Revolisyon rap kreyol LIONVEGA

    2:48

    mwen kwe ke ayiti kap chanje,,,, LION VEGA

Shares

x

Check Also

Menu