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Playlist of Teddy Wilson

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  • Teddy Wilson - Greatest Swing Combos

    1:18:14

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    TEDDY WILSON - GREATEST SWING COMBOS 1935-1938

    TEDDY WILSON
    Roy Eldridge (tp, voc), Buster Bailey (cl), Chuck Berry (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Bob Lessey (g), Israel Crosby (b), Sid Catlett (dm)
    1 Blues in C-Sharp Minor (Wilson) 0:00
    2 Warmin' Up (Wilson) 3:17
    3 Too Good To Be True (Boland) 6:29
    4 Mary Had a Little Lamb (Malneck - Simes) 9:39
    Roy Eldridge (tp), Cecil Scott (cl), Hilton Jefferson (as), Ben Webster (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Lawrence Lucie (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm) –
    5 Sweet Lorraine (Parish - Burwell) 12:34
    Dick Clark (tp), Tom Macey (cl), Johnny Hodges (as), Teddy Wilson (p), Dave Barbour (g), Grachan Moncur (b), Cozy Cole (dm)
    6 Sugar Plum (Kahn - Johnston) 15:37
    Gordon Griffin (tp), Rudy Powell (cl), Ted McRae (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), John Trueheart (g), Grachan Moncur (b), Cozy Cole (dm)
    7 Rhythm in My Nursery Rhyme (Cahn - Lunceford) 18:35
    Frank Newton (tp), Benny Morton (tb), Jerry Blake (cl), Ted McRae (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), John Trueheart (g), Leemie Stanfield (b), Cozy Cole (dm) - march 17, 1936
    8 Christopher Columbus (Berry - Razaf) 21:34
    Jonah Jones (tp), Johnny Hodges (as), Harry Carney (bar), Teddy Wilson (p), Lawrence Lucie (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm)
    9 Why Do I Lie to Myself About You? (Davis - Coots) 24:16
    Jonah Jones (tp), Benny Goodman (cl), Ben Webster (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm) - november 19, 1936
    10 Sailin' (Wilson) 27:19
    Harry James (tp), Buster Bailey (cl), Johnny Hodges (as), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm), Helen Ward (voc)
    11 There's a Lull in My Life (Gordon - Revel) 30:09
    12 It's Swell of You (Gordon - Tevel) 33:21
    13 How Am I To Know? (Parker - King) 36:20
    14 I'm Coming Virginia (Heywood - Cook) 39:38
    Cootie Williams (tp), Harry Carney (cl,bar) replace James and Bailey. No vocalist.
    15 Fine and Dandy (Swift - Jones) 42:20
    Buck Clayton (tp), Buster Bailey (cl), Lester Young (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Freddie Green (g), Walter Page (b), Jo Jones (dm)
    16 I've Found a New Baby (Palmer - Williams) 44:54
    Harry James (tp), Benny Goodman (cl), Vido Musso (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), Harry Goodman (b), Gene Krupa (dm)
    17 Coquette (Kahn - Lombardo - Green) 47:32
    Harry James (tp), Red Norvo (xil), Teddy Wilson (p), John Simmons (b) - september 5, 1937
    18 Just a Mood - pts 1&2 (Wilson) 50:13
    19 Ain't Misbehavin' (Wallker - Razaf) 56:59
    20 Honeysuckle Rose Waller - Razaf) 59:45
    Bobby Hackett (cn), Pee Wee Russell (cl), Tab Smith (as), Gene Sedric (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), Al Hall (b), Johnny Blowers (dm)
    21 Don't Be That Way (Parish - Goodman) 1:02:54
    Bobby Hackett (cn), Pee Wee Russell (cl), Johnny Hodges (as), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), Al Hall (b), Johnny Blowers (dm), Nan Wynn (voc)
    22 If I Were You (Bernier - Emmerich) 1:05:56
    23 You Go To My Head (Gillespie - Coots) 1:08:52
    24 I'll Dream Tonight (Mercer -Whiting) 1:12:59
    25 Jungle Love (Robin - Rainger) 1:15:18

    Theodore Shaw “Teddy” Wilson (1912-1986) was the epitome of swing piano and probably the most influential piano player of the thirties.
    In 1935 John Hammond arranged for him a recording contract with the ARC company that produced one of the most rappresentative series of small group recordings of the period. The sessions relied extensively on improvvisation by top musicians mostly changing from session to session.
    Since the first date however, the producers gave a lot of room to vocalist Billie Holiday, then a newcomer.
    She had such a big success that those records in the eyes of pubblic soon became her own.
    And the musicians themselves were among the top soloists of best known big bands

    Thank you so much for watching this video by Halidon Music channel, we hope you enjoyed it! Don't forget to share it

    Relive the magic of Jazz legends Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Lester Young, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Charlie Parker, Coleman Hawkins, Django Reinhardt, Lionel Hampton, Eddie Condon, Count Basie and many more.

  • x
  • Teddy Wilson Trio - All of me

    2:58

    A wonderful piece from Teddy Wilson's album I got rhythm

    Piano: Teddy Wilson
    Bass: Gene Ramey
    Drums: Papa Jo Jones

  • x
  • PIANO PARTY TEDDY WILSON, DICK HYMAN 7 7 77 Nice

    29:51

    TEDDY WILSON: FATS WALLER Medley: I'M GONNA SIT RIGHT DOWN AND WRITE MYSELF A LETTER - I'VE GOT A FEELING I'M FALLING - AIN'T MISBEHAVIN' - HONEYSUCKLE ROSE / DUKE ELLINGTON Medley: SOPHISTICATED LADY - SATIN DOLL /
    LOVE / SHINY STOCKINGS //

    DICK HYMAN: LOVER, COME BACK TO ME / CAROLINA SHOUT / MAPLE LEAF RAG /
    Presented on March 8, 2021 -- the occasion, the 94th birthday of Maestro Hyman -- with great respect, by Michael Steinman for JAZZ LIVES (

  • But Not For Me - Teddy Wilson 1985

    3:38

    The Man I Love - But Not For Me

    October 7, 1985 @The New York Marriott Marquis

    Piano:Teddy Wilson
    Bass:Slam Stewart
    Drums:Louis Bellson

  • x
  • Teddy Wilson - I Got Rhythm

    3:02

    A fine musician from my home town.

    Theodore Shaw Teddy Wilson (November 24, 1912 -- July 31, 1986) was an American jazz pianist. Described by critic Scott Yannow as the definitive swing pianist, Wilson's sophisticated and elegant style was featured on the records of many of the biggest names in jazz including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald. With Goodman, he was perhaps the first well-known black musician to play publicly in a racially integrated group. In addition to his extensive work as a sideman, Wilson also led his own groups and recording sessions from the late 1920s to the '80s.

    Wilson was born in Austin, Texas, on November 24, 1912. He studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. After working in the Lawrence Speed Webb band, with Louis Armstrong, and also understudying Earl Hines in Hines's Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter's Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935, he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band's intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became the first black musician to perform in public with a previously all-white jazz group.

    Noted jazz producer and writer John Hammond was instrumental in getting Wilson a contract with Brunswick, starting in 1935, to record hot swing arrangements of the popular songs of the day, with the growing jukebox trade in mind. He recorded fifty hit records with various singers such as Lena Horne, Helen Ward and Billie Holiday, including many of Holiday's greatest successes. During these years, he also took part in many highly regarded sessions with a wide range of important swing musicians such as Lester Young, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Red Norvo, Buck Clayton, and Ben Webster.

    Wilson formed his own short-lived big band in 1939, then led a sextet at Café Society from 1940 to 1944. He was dubbed the Marxist Mozart by Howard Stretch Johnson due to his support for left-wing causes (he performed in benefit concerts for The New Masses journal and for Russian War Relief and chaired the Artists' Committee to elect Benjamin J. Davis). In the 1950s, he taught at the Juilliard School. Wilson can be seen appearing as himself in the 1955 motion picture The Benny Goodman Story. He was also the music director for the Dick Cavett Show.

    Wilson lived quietly in suburban Hillsdale, New Jersey, in the 1960s and 1970s. He performed as a soloist and with pick-up groups until the final years of his life.

    Wilson died in Hillsdale, on July 31, 1986; he was 73. He is buried at Fairview Cemetery in New Britain, Connecticut.

  • Teddy Wilson - Aint Misbehavin

    2:48

    Ain't Misbehavin', played by Teddy Wilson.
    © Thomas Fats Waller

    - Get the sheet music here!


    - Original audio


    Thanks for watching :)

    ↓ Commission a transcription ↓
    msg me on daanschreudermusic@gmail.com
    #Jazz #Transcription #Piano

  • x
  • Swing Legends Vol.9 - Teddy Wilson

    59:33

    TRACKLIST
    01- Remember Me 00:11
    02- B Flat Swing 02:56
    03- China boy 05:54
    04- Blues Too 08:42
    05- Chinatown, my Chinatown 11:57
    06- Fine and dandy 14:36
    07- How High The Moon 16:21
    08- I Can't Get Started 20:51
    09- I Surrender Dear 24:05
    10- If Dreams Come True 26:56
    11- Just like a butterfly 30:01
    12- More than you know 32:58
    13- Night and day 35:54
    14- Out of nowhere 38:28
    15- Rose Room 41:07
    16- Russian Lullaby 43:35
    17- Stompin' At The Savoy 48:34
    18- Sunday 51:15
    19- Undecided 54:47
    20- Rosetta 56:23


    Swing Legends Vol.9 - Teddy Wilson (Full Album)
    Download on Google Play:



    Theodore Shaw Wilson (November 24, 1912 – July 31, 1986) was an American jazz pianist. Described by critic Scott Yanow as the definitive swing pianist, Wilson's sophisticated and elegant style was featured on the records of many of the biggest names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald. With Goodman, he was one of the first black musicians to appear prominently with white musicians. In addition to his extensive work as a sideman, Wilson also led his own groups and recording sessions from the late 1920s to the 1980s.

    Listen to the Best Music of:
    Etta James, Billie Holiday, Bill Evans, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Nina Simone, Muddy Waters, Django Reinhardt, Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, James Brown, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington, Elvis Presley, Count Basie, Herbie Hancock, Edith Piaf, Aretha Franklin, Charlie Parker, Lightnin' Hopkins, B.B. King, Thelonious Monk, Howlin' Wolf, Quincy Jones, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Paul Anka, John Coltrane, John Lee Hooker, Coleman Hawkins, Robert Johnson, Dean Martin, Oscar Peterson, George Gershwin, Frank Sinatra, Hank Williams, Benny Goodman, Art Tatum, Joe Turner, Bing Crosby, Dave Brubeck, Mahalia Jackson, Fats Domino, Marvin Gaye, Bud Powell, Sonny Rollins, Tony Bennett... and many others!
    Listen to the Best Music of:
    Etta James, Billie Holiday, Bill Evans, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Nina Simone, Muddy Waters, Django Reinhardt, Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, James Brown, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington, Elvis Presley, Count Basie, Herbie Hancock, Edith Piaf, Aretha Franklin, Charlie Parker, Lightnin' Hopkins, B.B. King, Thelonious Monk, Howlin' Wolf, Quincy Jones, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Paul Anka, John Coltrane, John Lee Hooker, Coleman Hawkins, Robert Johnson, Dean Martin, Oscar Peterson, George Gershwin, Frank Sinatra, Hank Williams, Benny Goodman, Art Tatum, Joe Turner, Bing Crosby, Dave Brubeck, Mahalia Jackson, Fats Domino, Marvin Gaye, Bud Powell, Sonny Rollins, Tony Bennett... and many others!

  • TEDDY WILSON WITH BENNY GOODMAN - LIONEL HAMPTON - GENE KRUPA - LIVE

    40:15

    THEODORE SHAW ''TEDDY'' WILSON
    TEDDY WILSON IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE MOST
    IMPORTANT PIANISTS OF THE SWING PERIOD.
    NOVEMBER 24, 1912 - (AUSTIN, TEXAS)
    JULY 31, 1986 - (NEW BRITAIN, CONNECTICUT)
    1) Flyn' Home (pn)
    2) Basin Street Blues
    3) Stompin' At The Savoy
    4) Body And Soul
    5) Shiny Stockings
    6) Lil' Darlin'
    7) One O' Clock Jump
    8) Moonglow
    9) Avalon
    10) Sweet Georgia Brown
    Teddy Wilson Trio:
    Teddy Wilson (pn), Jachie Samson (cb), Charles Saudrais (dm)
    Teddy Wilson Quintet: Benny Goodman (cl), Lionel Hampton, Red Norvo (vib), Teddy Wilson (pn), George Duvivier, Sid Weiss (cb),
    Gene Krupa, Charles Saudrais, B, Meltorne (dm)

  • Teddy Wilson ‎– Teddy Wilson And His Big Band 1939 Live!

    38:59

    Trumpets: Doc Cheatham, Carl George, Hal Baker
    Trombones: Jake Wiley, Floyd Brady
    Saxophones- Altos: Rudy Powell, Pete Clark
    Tenors: Ben Webster, George Irish
    Piano: Buster Harding or Teddy Wilson
    Guitar: Al Casey
    Bass: Al Hall
    Drums: J. C. Heard
    Vocal: Thelma Carpenter


    Side A: 1939 America Dances Broadcast via BBC London (England)
    B1 - B3: Paul Baron Orchestra Music In The Air Show - 9-4-1944
    B4, B5: Mildred Bailey Show, 1-5-1945
    B6 : 2-9-1945
    B7 : 12-8-1944



    A1 Introduction / I Know That You Know 0:00
    A2 Stairway To The Stars 3:31
    A3 Exactly Like You 6:26
    A4 The Man I Love 10:06
    A5 Boolajaja 12:56
    A6 Back To Back 15:37
    A7 Body And Soul 17:27
    B1 Hallelujah 19:32
    B2 Come Out Wherever You Are 22:07
    B3 I Used To Love You 24:29
    B4 It Had To Be You 27:54
    B5 The Shiek Of Araby 30:09
    B6 Tiger Rag 33:47
    B7 Sweet Georgia Brown 36:45




    FAIR USE DISCLAIMER: I do not own copyright for this copyrighted artwork, but under Section 107 United States Copyright Law as noted by the United States Copyright Office (Copyright Act 1976), allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.
    I state here in a good faith that I have made and uploaded here this copy of this copyrighted artwork completely for the purposes of teaching and research, that my action - i.e. my production of the copy of this copyrighted artwork and sharing of it here on Youtube in this particular case - is totally non-profit, and that I believe that my production of this copy of this copyrighted artwork and sharing of it here in Youtube in this particular case can only increase value of this copyrighted artwork and produce only positive effects for this copyrighted artwork in its potential market.

  • x
  • Earl Hines & Teddy Wilson All Of Me

    2:34

    Earl Hines & Teddy Wilson - All Of Me - Jazz Piano Workshop Berlin 1965


    ---

  • Teddy Wilson - Someone To Watch Over Me

    3:07

    A fine musician from my home town.

    Theodore Shaw Teddy Wilson (November 24, 1912 -- July 31, 1986) was an American jazz pianist. Described by critic Scott Yannow as the definitive swing pianist, Wilson's sophisticated and elegant style was featured on the records of many of the biggest names in jazz including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald. With Goodman, he was perhaps the first well-known black musician to play publicly in a racially integrated group. In addition to his extensive work as a sideman, Wilson also led his own groups and recording sessions from the late 1920s to the '80s.

    Wilson was born in Austin, Texas, on November 24, 1912. He studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. After working in the Lawrence Speed Webb band, with Louis Armstrong, and also understudying Earl Hines in Hines's Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter's Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935, he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band's intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became the first black musician to perform in public with a previously all-white jazz group.

    Noted jazz producer and writer John Hammond was instrumental in getting Wilson a contract with Brunswick, starting in 1935, to record hot swing arrangements of the popular songs of the day, with the growing jukebox trade in mind. He recorded fifty hit records with various singers such as Lena Horne, Helen Ward and Billie Holiday, including many of Holiday's greatest successes. During these years, he also took part in many highly regarded sessions with a wide range of important swing musicians such as Lester Young, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Red Norvo, Buck Clayton, and Ben Webster.

    Wilson formed his own short-lived big band in 1939, then led a sextet at Café Society from 1940 to 1944. He was dubbed the Marxist Mozart by Howard Stretch Johnson due to his support for left-wing causes (he performed in benefit concerts for The New Masses journal and for Russian War Relief and chaired the Artists' Committee to elect Benjamin J. Davis). In the 1950s, he taught at the Juilliard School. Wilson can be seen appearing as himself in the 1955 motion picture The Benny Goodman Story. He was also the music director for the Dick Cavett Show.

    Wilson lived quietly in suburban Hillsdale, New Jersey, in the 1960s and 1970s. He performed as a soloist and with pick-up groups until the final years of his life.

    Wilson died in Hillsdale, on July 31, 1986; he was 73. He is buried at Fairview Cemetery in New Britain, Connecticut.

  • TEDDY WILSON SEXTET -The Onyx Club 1944 w/ SIDNEY CATLETT

    43:39

    TEDDY WILSON SEXTET -THE ONYX CLUB ORIGINAL LIVE-RECORDINGS 1944
    Personnel:
    Teddy Wilson (piano)
    Edmond Hall (clarinet)
    Emmett Berry (trumpet)
    Benny Morton (trombone)
    Slam Stewart (bass)
    Sidney Catlett (drums)

    01) Don't Be That Way
    02) A Touch Of Boogie Woogie (03:32)
    03) I Got Rhythm (8:10)
    04) Rose Room (11:05)
    05) Flying Home (15:09)
    06) 'B' Flat Swing (19:53)
    07) Embraceable You (24:38)
    08) Indiana (28:46)
    09) Mop Mop (31:49)
    10) Honeysuckle Rose (36:37)
    11) Oh, Lady Be Good (40:15)

  • Moonglow 1972 - Teddy Wilson

    31:19

    Label: Black Lion Records - BLP 30133
    Format: Vinyl
    Country: UK
    Released: 1972

    Song List:
    【00:00】A1 - Flying Home
    【04:32】A2 - Moonglow
    【09:01】A3 - As Time Goes By
    【11:28】A4 - Honeysuckle Rose
    【15:25】B1 - Poor Butterfly
    【21:58】B2 - Ain't Misbehavin'
    【24:30】B3 - I'm Thru With Love
    【26:55】B4 - Air Mail Special

    Musicians:
    ・Teddy Wilson (Piano)
    ・Dave Shepherd (Clarinet: A4, B1, B4)
    ・Ronnie Gleaves (Vibraphone: A4, B1, B4)
    ・Peter Chapman (Bass: A2, B1, B2, B4)
    ・Johnny Richardson (Drums: A2, B1, B2, B4)

  • Teddy Wilson: Dont Blame Me 1937

    7:43

    One of most innovative and poetic jazz piano solos ever recorded, Teddy Wilson's 1937 Don't Blame Me, in both takes, plus commentary.

  • Teddy Wilson - Greatest Swing Combos

    1:18:14

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    TEDDY WILSON - GREATEST SWING COMBOS 1935-1938

    TEDDY WILSON and His Orchestra
    Roy Eldridge (tp, voc), Buster Bailey (cl), Chuck Berry (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Bob Lessey (g), Israel Crosby (b), Sid Catlett (dm)
    1 Blues in C-Sharp Minor (Wilson) 0:00
    2 Warmin' Up (Wilson) 3:17
    3 Too Good To Be True (Boland) 6:29
    4 Mary Had a Little Lamb (Malneck - Simes) 9:39
    Roy Eldridge (tp), Cecil Scott (cl), Hilton Jefferson (as), Ben Webster (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Lawrence Lucie (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm) –
    5 Sweet Lorraine (Parish - Burwell) 12:34
    Dick Clark (tp), Tom Macey (cl), Johnny Hodges (as), Teddy Wilson (p), Dave Barbour (g), Grachan Moncur (b), Cozy Cole (dm)
    6 Sugar Plum (Kahn - Johnston) 15:37
    Gordon Griffin (tp), Rudy Powell (cl), Ted McRae (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), John Trueheart (g), Grachan Moncur (b), Cozy Cole (dm)
    7 Rhythm in My Nursery Rhyme (Cahn - Lunceford) 18:35
    Frank Newton (tp), Benny Morton (tb), Jerry Blake (cl), Ted McRae (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), John Trueheart (g), Leemie Stanfield (b), Cozy Cole (dm) - march 17, 1936
    8 Christopher Columbus (Berry - Razaf) 21:34
    Jonah Jones (tp), Johnny Hodges (as), Harry Carney (bar), Teddy Wilson (p), Lawrence Lucie (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm)
    9 Why Do I Lie to Myself About You? (Davis - Coots) 24:16
    Jonah Jones (tp), Benny Goodman (cl), Ben Webster (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm) - november 19, 1936
    10 Sailin' (Wilson) 27:19
    Harry James (tp), Buster Bailey (cl), Johnny Hodges (as), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), John Kirby (b), Cozy Cole (dm), Helen Ward (voc)
    11 There's a Lull in My Life (Gordon - Revel) 30:09
    12 It's Swell of You (Gordon - Tevel) 33:21
    13 How Am I To Know? (Parker - King) 36:20
    14 I'm Coming Virginia (Heywood - Cook) 39:38
    Cootie Williams (tp), Harry Carney (cl,bar) replace James and Bailey. No vocalist.
    15 Fine and Dandy (Swift - Jones) 42:20
    Buck Clayton (tp), Buster Bailey (cl), Lester Young (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Freddie Green (g), Walter Page (b), Jo Jones (dm)
    16 I've Found a New Baby (Palmer - Williams) 44:54
    Harry James (tp), Benny Goodman (cl), Vido Musso (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), Harry Goodman (b), Gene Krupa (dm)
    17 Coquette (Kahn - Lombardo - Green) 47:32
    Harry James (tp), Red Norvo (xil), Teddy Wilson (p), John Simmons (b) - september 5, 1937
    18 Just a Mood - pts 1&2 (Wilson) 50:13
    19 Ain't Misbehavin' (Wallker - Razaf) 56:59
    20 Honeysuckle Rose Waller - Razaf) 59:45
    Bobby Hackett (cn), Pee Wee Russell (cl), Tab Smith (as), Gene Sedric (ts), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), Al Hall (b), Johnny Blowers (dm)
    21 Don't Be That Way (Parish - Goodman) 1:02:54
    Bobby Hackett (cn), Pee Wee Russell (cl), Johnny Hodges (as), Teddy Wilson (p), Allen Reuss (g), Al Hall (b), Johnny Blowers (dm), Nan Wynn (voc)
    22 If I Were You (Bernier - Emmerich) 1:05:56
    23 You Go To My Head (Gillespie - Coots) 1:08:52
    24 I'll Dream Tonight (Mercer -Whiting) 1:12:59
    25 Jungle Love (Robin - Rainger) 1:15:18

    Theodore Shaw “Teddy” Wilson (1912-1986) was the epitome of swing piano and probably the most influential piano player of the thirties.
    In 1935 John Hammond arranged for him a recording contract with the ARC company that produced one of the most rappresentative series of small group recordings of the period. The sessions relied extensively on improvvisation by top musicians mostly changing from session to session.
    Since the first date however, the producers gave a lot of room to vocalist Billie Holiday, then a newcomer.
    She had such a big success that those records in the eyes of pubblic soon became her own.
    Apart the fact that she didn’t partecipate to all sessions, this isn’t fair anyhow because the musical quality derived from the impromptu cullaboration between singer and musicians.
    And the musicians themselves were among the top soloists of best known big bands
    So this is collection of spare instrumental sides from the Holiday sessions and of some non-holiday gatherings, sometimes with other singers, is a long time missing compilation that we hope you will enjoy.

    Thank you so much for watching this video by Halidon Music channel, we hope you enjoyed it! Don't forget to share it and subscribe to our channel

    Love Jazz? Then look no further! With new videos constantly added, Halidon Music is home to the best Jazz on YouTube. Relive the magic of Jazz legends Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Lester Young, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Charlie Parker, Coleman Hawkins, Django Reinhardt, Lionel Hampton, Eddie Condon, Count Basie and many more. Travel back in time to the Golden Age of Jazz with us!

  • Teddy Wilson - As Time Goes By

    2:56

    80s Teddy best Teddy?

    Track 15.

  • Teddy Wilson Trio with Jo Jones on International Hour - American Jazz 1963

    5:49

    On the 1963 TV special International Hour - American Jazz, filmed at the Civic Opera House in Chicago, and hosted by Willis Conover.

  • I Cant Get Started With You - Teddy Wilson

    3:01

  • Teddy Wilson - More Than You Know

    3:04

    Teddy Wilson: Statements and Improvisations track 8 of 16

  • Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra - Sugar #vintagemusic #dancebands #bigbands

    2:52

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    The Past Perfect Channel expertly remasters music from the 1920s, 30s, 40s and 50s. French Music, Retro Music, Saxophone Music, Italian Music, Jazz Music, Swing Band Music, Morning Music, Piano and Guitar Music, Music while Cooking, Christmas Music, Background Music, Holiday Music, Big Bands, Dance Bands, Love Songs, Tea Dances, Vintage Parties, Murder Mystery Events, Ballroom Dancing, War Re-enactment Events, Nostalgic Songs. Master Rights Copyright: Past Perfect Limited
    Sugar by Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra from the album Tea Dance 1920s, 30s, 40s Vintage Tea Party
    Get your dance cards ready for sweeping your partner across the dance floor to 26 delightful vintage tunes. Perfect music for your afternoon or evening tea dances and tea parties.Sit back, soak up the ambience and then dance away the day in true tea dance style. Vintage Tea Parties are hugely popular again now and this CD puts all the favourite 'tea' themed dance and tea party music from the 1920s, 30s and 40s onto one fabulous album.
    © Past Perfect Limited
    ℗ Past Perfect Limited
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    Lyrics:
    Sugar, I call my baby, my sugar
    I never maybe my sugar
    That sugar baby of mine

    He's special ration
    Funny, he never asks for my money
    All that I give him is honey
    And that he can spend anytime

    I'd make a million trips to his lips
    If I were a bee
    Because he's sweeter than chocolate candy to me
    He's confectionery

    Sugar, I never cheat on my sugar
    'Cause I'm too sweet on my sugar
    That sugar baby of mine

  • x
  • Teddy Wilson Trio - Stompin at the Savoy

    4:17

    Teddy Wilson Trio - Stompin' at the Savoy (1956)

    Personnel: Teddy Wilson (piano), Gene Ramey (bass), Jo Jones (drums)

    from the album 'I GOT RHYTHM' (Verve Records)

  • IVE GOT THE WORLD ON A STRING

    3:38

  • Teddy Wilson Trio plays Misty

    2:46

    recorded in 1959,
    Teddy Wilson, piano
    Major Holley, bass
    Bert Dale, drums

  • Teddy Wilson - Rosetta

    2:53

    Teddy Wilson: Statements and Improvisations track 3 of 16

  • Teddy Wilson - My Blue Heaven

    2:13

    Here is a nice instrumental by the great Teddy Wilson (1912-1986). This piano genius recorded this number on May 13, 1938.

  • Teddy Wilson - You Go To My Head

    4:23

    Wilson was born in Austin, Texas, on November 24, 1912. He studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. After working in Speed Webb's band, with Louis Armstrong, and also understudying Earl Hines in Hines's Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter's Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935, he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band's intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became one of the first black musicians to perform prominently in a racially integrated group.

    DISCLAIMER: All music, lyrics, videos and photos, remain copyright of their respective owners. No infringement intended. Used for the Artist's promotional purposes only.
    If you like this recording, I strongly recommend you buying the record.

  • Lester Young Teddy Wilson PRES RETURNS

    6:22

    from the album PRES AND TEDDY 1956 Verve

    Teddy Wilson – piano
    Lester Young – tenor sax
    Gene Ramey – bass
    Jo Jones – drums

  • Teddy Wilson Sweet Georgia Brown

    2:47

    Album: Teddy Wilson & His Piano, Verbe

  • 1936 HITS ARCHIVE: Who Loves You? - Teddy Wilson

    3:14

    According to the label, this session’s drummer was someone named “Gene Kruppa.” 

    CD audio, original 78rpm issue on Brunswick 7768 - Who Loves You? (Davis-Coots) by Teddy Wilson & his Orchestra, vocal by Billie Holiday, recorded in NYC October 28, 1936

    THE 1936 HITS ARCHIVE - a collection of commercial recordings and songs that proved popular during the calendar year 1936 (some were recorded in 1935) via sales, sheet music, and radio exposure.…plus some others that have gained increased recognition or have been shown to have had an impact during the decades that followed.

  • Teddy Wilson - Poor Butterfly

    6:36

    “Poor Butterfly” as an instrumental by Teddy Wilson, is the eleventh track from the 1989 compilation disc, “World of Jazz: The Jazz Piano” for M.C.R. Productions – music composed by Raymond Hubble. Although diligent research was performed, and as a result of insufficient research materials, the producer of this video cannot be certain when this track was originally recorded and therefore cites Copyright 1990 M.C.R. Productions - respectfully yours, Anishinaube.

  • Teddy Wilson - Love Is The Sweetest Thing

    2:30

    Love Is The Sweetest Thing by Teddy Wilson

    Wikipedia:
    Theodore Shaw Wilson was an American jazz pianist. Described by critic Scott Yanow as the definitive swing pianist, Wilson's sophisticated and elegant style was featured on the records of many of the biggest names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald. With Goodman, he was one of the first black musicians to appear prominently with white musicians. In addition to his extensive work as a sideman, Wilson also led his own groups and recording sessions from the late 1920s to the 1980s.
    Wilson was born in Austin, Texas, on November 24, 1912. He studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. After working in Speed Webb's band, with Louis Armstrong, and also understudying Earl Hines in Hines's Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter's Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935, he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band's intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became one of the first black musicians to perform prominently in a racially integrated group.

    This video quote:
    If it's enough money, I'll play the North Pole. - Teddy Wilson
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ►Follow me on Instagram ????:
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    My free practice recommendations I use myself:
    ►Perfect Ear app to train your hearing (Android & IOS) ????????:
    ►Complete Music Reading Trainer (Only Android) ????:
    ►Hanon exercises to improve the piano fingerwork ????????:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Things I recommend that I paid for to practice Jazz Piano:
    ►My current digital piano is the Roland RP501r ????:
    ►iReal Pro app to practice with backing tracks ????:
    ►If you're about to get your first digital piano, I would recommend the Yamaha DGX-660 ????:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ►If you're planning on buying a self-paced piano course to learn Jazz I recommend Pianoforall ????:
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    #stridepiano #teddywilson #loveisthesweetestthing #swingpiano #oldjazz #pianotutorial #earlyjazz #classicjazz #synthesia #jazzsynthesia #swing #roaringtwenties #syncopation #solopiano #solopianojazz

  • Teddy Wilson Trio - In My Solitude ~ Take The A Train

    5:43

    Teddy Wilson Trio - In My Solitude ~ Take The A Train (Medley)
    Teddy Wilson (p), Layman Jackson (b), Billy Daniels (ds)
    Album: Teddy Wilson / Gershwin Ellington And More
    Recorded: Atlanta, Georgia, August 17, 1980

  • Teddy Wilson - Moon ray

    3:22

    Performer(s): « Teddy Wilson » & « Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra »
    « Moon ray »
    Audio : Very Hq - CD Quality Sound -- MP3 320 Kbps

    Album : « ABC Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra Vol 1 » by « Teddy Wilson »

    Genre et sous style:
    Jazz

  • Billie Holiday & Harry James . - Here It Is Tomorrow Again

    2:53

    These (6 - six) songs were previously posted, but the lackness of information made me do it again.
    Teddy Wilson And His Orchestra with Billie Holiday and Harry James (NYC, October 31, 1938)
    Harry James (trumpet) Benny Morton (trombone) Benny Carter, Edgar Sampson (alto saxophone) Herschel Evans, Lester Young (tenor saxophone) Teddy Wilson (piano) Albert Casey (guitar) Walter Page (bass) Jo Jones (drums) Billie Holiday (vocals)
    Matrix B23643-1 Here It Is Tomorrow Again - Label/Record: Brunswick 8259; CBS/Sony (J) SOPH 67/68

  • 1937 HITS ARCHIVE: You Can’t Stop Me From Dreamin’ - Teddy Wilson

    2:54

    Instrumental piece shown on the label as a “stomp”….and it is! This bright-tempo’d tune reached #1 on “Your Hit Parade” and was a recording success for the bands of both Wilson and Ozzie Nelson (also available on this channel).

    Band personnel: Teddy Wilson, Buster Bailey, Lester Young, Buck Clayton, Jonathan Jones, Freddie Green, Walter Page

    LP audio, originally issued on 78rpm: Brunswick 7954 - You Can’t Stop Me From Dreamin’ (Friend-Franklin) by Teddy Wilson & his Orchestra, recorded in Los Angeles August 29, 1937

  • Teddy Wilson - Ill Never Be The Same .

    7:44

    I'll Never Be The Same is a popular song based on an instrumental called Little Buttercup written by Matty Malneck and Frank Signorelli. After several musicians had recorded the instrumental version, lyrics were written by Gus Kahn. The completed song was introduced in 1932 by Mildred Bailey and Paul Whiteman; their version rose to number fourteen on the charts. The same year, Guy Lombardo recorded the song; his version rose to number eight. It is ranked 210 in JazzStandards.com's listing of the 1000 most-frequently recorded jazz standard compositions.
    ___________________________________________
    Theodore Shaw Wilson (November 24, 1912 – July 31, 1986) was an American jazz pianist. Described by critic Scott Yanow as the definitive swing pianist, Wilson had a sophisticated, elegant style. His work was featured on the records of many of the biggest names in jazz, including Louis Armstrong, Lena Horne, Benny Goodman, Billie Holiday, and Ella Fitzgerald. With Goodman, he was one of the first black musicians to appear prominently with white musicians. In addition to his extensive work as a sideman, Wilson also led his own groups and recording sessions from the late 1920s to the 1980s.

    Wilson was born in Austin, Texas, on November 24, 1912. He studied piano and violin at Tuskegee Institute in Tuskegee, Alabama. After working in Speed Webb's band, with Louis Armstrong, and also understudying Earl Hines in Hines's Grand Terrace Cafe Orchestra, Wilson joined Benny Carter's Chocolate Dandies in 1933. In 1935, he joined the Benny Goodman Trio (which consisted of Goodman, Wilson and drummer Gene Krupa, later expanded to the Benny Goodman Quartet with the addition of Lionel Hampton). The trio performed during the big band's intermissions. By joining the trio, Wilson became one of the first black musicians to perform prominently in a racially integrated group.

    Jazz producer and writer John Hammond was instrumental in getting Wilson a contract with Brunswick, starting in 1935, to record hot swing arrangements of the popular songs of the day, with the growing jukebox trade in mind. He recorded fifty hit records with various singers such as Lena Horne, Helen Ward and Billie Holiday, including many of Holiday's greatest successes. During these years, he also took part in many highly regarded sessions with a wide range of important swing musicians such as Lester Young, Roy Eldridge, Charlie Shavers, Red Norvo, Buck Clayton, Sarah Vaughan and Ben Webster. From 1936 to 1942 he recorded for Brunswick Records and Columbia Records. In the 1950s he recorded on Verve Records.

    Wilson formed his own short-lived big band in 1939, then led a sextet at Cafe Society from 1940 to 1944. He was dubbed the Marxist Mozart by Howard Stretch Johnson due to his support for left-wing causes: he performed in benefit concerts for The New Masses journal and for Russian War Relief, and he chaired the Artists' Committee to elect Benjamin J. Davis (a New York City council member running on the Communist Party USA ballot line). In the 1950s, Wilson taught at the Juilliard School. Wilson can be seen appearing as himself in the 1937 motion picture Hollywood Hotel and in The Benny Goodman Story from 1955. He also worked as music director for the Dick Cavett Show.

    Wilson lived quietly in suburban Hillsdale, New Jersey. He was married three times, including to the songwriter Irene Kitchings. He performed as a soloist and with pick-up groups until the final years of his life, including leading a trio with his sons Theodore Wilson on bass and Steven Wilson on drums.

    In 1979, Wilson was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Music from Berklee College of Music.

    Wilson died of stomach cancer in New Britain, Connecticut, on July 31, 1986; he was 73. He is buried at Fairview Cemetery in New Britain. In addition to Theodore and Steven, Wilson had three more children, William, James (Jim) and Dune.
    ___________________________________________
    Tracklist:
    1. I'll Never Be The Same (M. Malneck/F. Signorelli).
    ___________________________________________
    Personnel:
    1. Teddy Wilson - piano
    2. Dave Shepherd - clarinet
    3. Ronnie Gleaves - vibraphone
    4. Johnny Richardson - drums
    5. Peter Chapman - bass.
    ___________________________________________
    Genre: Jazz/Swing
    Recorded: at Chappell Studios, London; June 18, 1967.
    Label: Black Lion Records – BLCD 760152
    Release: 1991
    Country: Germany
    Engineer [Recording] – John Timperley
    Photography By – Jan Persson
    Producer – Alan Bates, Terry Brown.

  • Teddy Wilson - Ill See You In My Dreams

    2:16

    Here is a great Teddy Wilson (1912-1986) instrumental. This piano genius recorded this number on August 11, 1938.

  • Oh Lady Be Good - Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra

    2:58

    This is Teddy Wilson's 1941 version of Oh, Lady Be Good! written in 1924 by George and Ira Gershwin.

  • Teddy Wilson - Body And Soul

    3:13

    Teddy Wilson: Statements and Improvisations track 14 of 16

  • Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson What A Little Moonlight Can Do Brunswick LYRICS HERE

    3:01

    Billie Holiday sings for Teddy Wilson and His Orchestra: What A Little Moonlight Can Do on Brunswick 7498 (later reissued as 8336), recorded on July 2, 1935.

    The song is by Harry Woods, and this moonlight song covered by Billie is not to be confused with another moonlight song covered by her--I refer to I Wished on the Moon, which is by Ralph Rainger and Dorothy Parker.

    Teddy Wilson never sounded better! Such grace at incredible speed!

    Billie never again sang on any record at such a fast tempo. Indeed, she later took songs at slow speeds, perhaps believing this made her a more serious artist--a shame! I always prefer Billie in the up-tempo numbers, which usually means from early in her career.

    A young Billie Holiday sings the vocal refrain. This was her third recording session.

    Her first was on November 27, 1933, which produced Your Mother's Son-In-Law, Billie providing vocals as white musicians played (or mostly white--perhaps Buck Washington was at the piano).

    The second session was on December 18, 1933, which produced Riffin' the Scotch (she returned to the studio on this date since an earlier take of Riffin' the Scotch from the November session did not pass muster).

    This third session is historic since it produced four tracks, all outstanding. Teddy Wilson is the leader, Billie providing brief vocals, so technically these are Teddy Wilson recordings though it is understandable if jazz fans think of them as Billie Holiday records.

    I view the four recordings from this session not as Billie Holiday numbers as discs featuring Teddy Wilson with an All-Star Cast of Jazz Superheroes. Billie is one superstar among others--Benny Goodman, Ben Webster, Roy Eldridge, Teddy Wilson!

    Musicians on this are Benny Goodman (clarinet--some labels that identify the players call him John Jackson since his name could not appear on the label), Roy Eldridge (trumpet), Ben Webster (tenor saxophone), Teddy Wilson (piano), John Trueheart (guitar), John Kirby (bass), Cozy Cole (drums), and Billie Holiday (vocals).

    Ooh, ooh, ooh
    What a little moonlight can do
    Ooh, ooh, ooh
    What a little moonlight can do to you
    You're in love
    Your heart's a-fluttering all day long
    You only stutter 'cause your poor tongue
    Just will not utter the words I love you
    Ooh, ooh, ooh
    What a little moonlight can do
    Wait a while
    Till a little moonbeam comes peepin' through
    You'll get bold
    You can't resist him, and
    All you'll say
    When you have kissed him is
    Ooh, ooh, ooh
    What a little moonlight can do

    My rule of thumb for Billie Holiday records is the earlier, the better. This is very early, and I love this recording--it never bores me unlike many of Billie's later discs.

    I likewise cherish what came from Billie's first session (Your Mother's Son-In-Law) and second (Riffin' the Scotch--or call that her third since she returned to the studio) and the other Teddy Wilson sessions of the mid-1930s, but by the late 1930s, sessions produced less interesting material to my ears.

    The 1940s were uneven for Billie, and almost nothing by Billie from the 1950s holds my attention.

    Billie Holiday was born Eleanora Fagan (or Eleanor Holiday? Eleanora Fagan Gough? Elinore DeViese?) on April 7, 1915, in Baltimore (if we trust her autobiography--perhaps that is not wise) or in Philadelphia (more likely--see her birth registration).

    Jazz critics complain that Billie was forced to work with trite songs in her early days. I trust my ears--I can't trust jazz critics who make such silly pronouncements. The young Billie Holiday handles so-called trite songs in very interesting ways, and I prefer Billie's early trite material to her later recordings of songs by Cole Porter, Gershwin, and other song-writing giants.

    From 1935 until a recording ban on August 1, 1942, Billie sang on around 150 sides (153? 158?) that were or became Columbia property. Original labels include Brunswick and Vocalion.

    She made Commodore recordings, beginning on April 20, 1939.

    She made Decca recordings, starting in October 1944--by this time Billie was more of a chanteuse or star of song or cabaret singer, less of a jazz singer. This was Billie as a serious artist (paradoxically, she was better when she wasn't trying to be a serious artist--in the early days she merely sang pop songs, and she shined).

    On Decca discs she dominated records, the background musicians staying in the background.

    From 1952 to 1957, she sang for Norman Granz's Verve label, but Billie's voice was a pale shadow by this time of what it had been. Some of her late work is painful to hear.

    Billie is best in early Teddy Wilson recordings--or at sessions with people like Teddy Wilson (after all, she worked with other great pianists). Billie is superb when she is just one of the gang at a session of superstars. She gets her turn--and Lester gets a turn, or Ben Webster, or Jess Stacy, or Buck Clayton.



    Billie Holiday & Teddy Wilson What A Little Moonlight Can Do Brunswick (1935) LYRICS HERE

  • Teddy Wilson Trio - If I Had You

    2:44

    Teddy Wilson Trio - If I Had You (1955)

    Personnel: Teddy Wilson (piano), Milt Hinton (bass), Jo Jones (drums)

    from the album 'FOR QUIET LOVERS' (Verve Records)

  • Teddy Wilson - Wham

    3:05

    Performer(s): « Teddy Wilson »
    « Wham »
    Audio : Very Hq - CD Quality Sound -- MP3 320 Kbps

    Album : « 99 Hits : Teddy Wilson » by « Teddy Wilson »

    Genre et sous style:
    Jazz

  • Teddy Wilson - Whispering

    2:08

    Here is a V-disc of the great Teddy Wilson (1912-1986) that his sextette recorded in November of 1944.

  • Teddy Wilson - Them There Eyes

    2:55

    Teddy Wilson: Statements and Improvisations track 12 of 16

  • Billie Holiday ft Teddy Wilson - My Man Brunswick Records 1937

    3:06

    Mon Homme is a popular song known by its English translation, My Man. The song was originally composed by Jacques Charles, the writer, Channing Pollock, Albert Willemetz, and Maurice Yvain.

    Although the song originated in France -- where it was a hit for Mistinguett in 1916 -- it was popularized in the English speaking world in the 1920s with the 1921 recording by Ziegfeld Follies singer Fanny Brice. The song was a hit, and the record eventually earned a Grammy Hall of Fame Award for Brice in 1999.

    The ballad version recorded by Brice was modified by Billie Holiday, who introduced a jazz/blues recording of My Man. Holiday's version was also successful, although the song continued to be associated with Brice. Over the years, other artists from both the United States and abroad covered the song, though none of the artists achieved as much success as Brice and Holliday. One notable version was a 1940s recording by Edith Piaf, the most notable recording of Mon Homme in its original language.

    Peggy Lee recorded the song for her 1959 album I Like Men! Her arrangement is very minimalistic, with the drums predominant in the mix.

    In 1965, the song was covered by Barbra Streisand, the then-rising star of the hit Broadway musical, Funny Girl, a semi-biographical account of Fanny Brice's life. Streisand's cover became a minor commercial success, and was also included on the album My Name Is Barbra and in the film adaptation of Funny Girl. Her emotional rendition of My Man as the film's finale drew additional critical praise to an already lauded performance that earned her the Academy Award for Best Actress in 1968.

    Diana Ross performed the song in her final concert appearance as a Supreme at the Frontier Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 14, 1970. Her performance was recorded & later released on the 1970 live album, Farewell. Ross adopted Billie Holiday's jazz and blues version rather than the Brice or Streisand versions. In 1972, Ross recorded My Man again for the soundtrack for the film Lady Sings the Blues, in which she portrayed music legend Billie Holiday. The soundtrack album peaked at #1 on Billboard's Pop albums chart, reportedly selling over 300,000 copies during its first eight days of release. Ross' acting received critical acclaim and Golden Globe and Academy Award nominations for Best Actress; she won the Golden Globe award for Most Promising Newcomer. Ross' second version of the song was a revival of Holiday's jazz/blues reading. Ross gave one of her most critically hailed performances of the song in 1979 at Caesars Palace, Las Vegas, Nevada, which was recorded for an HBO concert special during her The Boss world tour.

    Billie's accompanied by Buck Clayton, t / Prince Robinson, cl / Vido Musso, ts / Teddy Wilson, p / Allan Reuss, g / Walter Page, sb / Cozy Cole (as SWING ROO). Recorded in New York, November 1, 1937. (Brunswick Records)

    Sometimes I say
    
If I just could get away
    
With my man
    He'd go straight sure as fate
    
For it never is too late 
for a man.
    I just like to dream
    
Of a cottage by a stream
    
With my man
    Where a few flowers grew

    And perhaps a kid or two

    Like my man.
    And then my eyes get wet
    
I 'most forget

    'Til he gets hot

    And tells me not to talk 
such rot

    (refrain)

    Oh my man I love him so

    He'll never know
    
All my life is just despair

    But I don't care

    When he takes me in his arms

    The world is bright

    All right
    What's the difference if I say

    I'll go away
    
When I know I'll come back

    On my knees someday
    For whatever my man is
    
I'm his 
forever more

  • Teddy Wilson 1973- Boogie Woogie/One O Clock Jump

    3:52

    (This Is A Audio Recording)
    This Was Recorded At Carnegie Hall NY On June 29, 1973 During The Orignal Benny Goodman Quartet Concert.
    This Features Teddy Wilson On Piano, Gene Krupa On Drums, Slam Stewart On Bass.
    The Song Is Called Boogie Woogie/One O' Clock Jump

  • Lester Young-Teddy Wilson Quartet / All of Me

    5:12

  • Teddy Wilson Trio - Ill Remember April

    6:07

    Teddy Wilson (p), Hugo Rasmussen (b), Ed Thigpen (ds)
    Album: Teddy Wilson / In Copenhagen
    Recorded:Live in Copenhagen, May 21, 1979

  • Teddy Wilson - This Years Kisses

    3:14

    Performer(s): « Teddy Wilson »
    « This Year's Kisses »
    Audio : Very Hq - CD Quality Sound -- MP3 320 Kbps

    Album : « Teddy Wilson & His Orchestra Vol 1 » by « Teddy Wilson »

    Genre et sous style:
    Jazz

  • TEDDY WILSON QUARTET play JUST A MOOD from SEPTEMBER 1937

    6:51

    JUST A MOOD..Great small jazz combos side from SEPTEMBER 1937 FOR COULMBIA RECORDS with TEDDY WILSON piano, HARRY JAMES on trumpet, RED NORVO on Marimbas AND JOHN SIMMONS on BASS.

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