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Playlist of Strauss Jr

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  • The best of Johann Strauss II

    1:13:51

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    Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)


    1.Voices of Spring, Op. 410, 0:00
    2.Tritsch-Tratsch Polka, Op. 214 6:59
    3.Emperor Waltz, Op. 437 9:42
    4.Annen Polka, Op. 117 21:45
    5.Enjoy Your Life, Waltz, Op. 340 24:46
    6.Egyptian March, Op. 335 33:10
    7.Vienna Blood Waltz, Op. 354 37:18
    8.Thunder & Lightning, Op. 324 46:47
    9.Die Fledermaus Waltz, Op. 367 50:06
    10.Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 57:00
    11.Bandit's Gallop, Op. 276 1:00:09
    12.Blue Danube, Op. 314 1:02:57

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  • Strauss II - Waltzes, Polkas & Operettas | Classical Music Collection

    2:47:19

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    STRAUSS II
    WALTZES, POLKAS & OPERETTAS

    01. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen), Waltz Op. 410 00:00
    02. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden), Waltz Op. 388 07:31
    03. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der schönen blauen Donau), Waltz Op. 314 17:11
    04. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz Op. 234 28:35
    05. Treasure Waltz (Schatz-Walzer), Op. 418 37:29
    06. Where the Lemon Trees Bloom (Wo die Citronen blüh'n), Waltz Op. 346 45:53
    07. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz Op. 443 55:36
    08. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons), Waltz Op. 307 01:05:32
    09. Artist's Life (Künstlerleben) Waltz Op. 316 01:14:56
    10. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz Op. 325 01:25:18
    11. Wine, Women and Song (Wein, Weib und Gesang) Waltz Op. 333 01:38:04
    12. Morning Journals (Morgenblätter), Op. 279 01:43:40
    13. Love Songs (Liebeslieder), Waltz Op. 114 01:54:48
    14. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz Op. 354 02:04:20
    15. Annen-Polka Op. 117 02:13.33
    16. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka Op. 319 02:16:36
    17. Tritsch-Tratsch Polka Op. 214 02:19:17
    18. Thunder & Lightning (Unter Donner und Blitz) Polka Op. 324 02:21:50
    19. Long live the Magyar (Éljen a Magyar! ), Polka Op. 332 02:24:53
    20. The Gypsy Baron: Ouverture 02:27:38
    21. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: March. Hurrah, die Schlacht 02:29:55
    22. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: Finale. Reich' ihm die Hand 02:32:44
    23. Persian March, Op. 289 02:33:47
    24. Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 02:36:04
    25. The Bat (Die Fledermaus): Ouverture 02:38:58

    Tracks 1-2, 10 & 25 performed by Vilnius Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 3, 20 & 22 performed by Donetsk Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 4-9, 11-19 & 23-24 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    Track 21 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Donetsk Chorus, Stefan Marzcik

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    #classicalmusic #strauss #waltz #polka #operetta

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  • Strauss Jr - STRAUSS THE BEST OF POLKAS

    2:1:06

    STRAUSS THE BEST OF POLKAS
    1. Auf der Jagd, Op. 373 00:00
    2. Pizzicato-Polka 2:08
    3. Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, Op. 214 4:44
    4. Die Schwatzerin, Op. 144 7:22
    5. Annen-Polka, Op. 117 11:04
    6. Jokey-Polka 15:03
    7. Feuerfest 17:11
    8. Eingesendet, Op. 240 20:07
    9. Demolirer-Polka, Op. 269 21:55
    10. Brennende Liebe, Op. 129 25:32
    11. Bahn frei!, Op. 45 29:49
    12. Aquarellen, Op. 258 32:14
    13. Sturmisch in Lieb' und Tanz, Op. 393 39:52
    14. Frauenherz, Op. 166 41:57
    15. Piefke und Pufke, Op. 235 46:00
    16. Im Krapfenwaldl, Op. 336 47:58
    17. Die Libelle, Op. 204 52:03
    18. Moulinet 56:27
    19. So angstlich sind wir nicht!, Op. 413 59:47
    20. Lob der Frauen, Op. 315 1:02:06
    21. Explosions-Polka, Op. 43 1:05:54
    22. Heiterer Mut, Op. 281 1:08:03
    23. Champagner-Polka, Op. 211 1:11:11
    24. Neue Pizzicato-Polka, Op. 449 1:13:17
    25. Eljien a Magyar!, Op. 332 1:16:51
    26. Unter Donner und Blitz, Op. 324 1:19:28
    27. Auf Ferienreisen, Op. 133 1:22:34
    28. Vergnugungszug, Op. 281 1:25:06
    29. Leichtes Blut, Op. 319 1:27:56
    30. Die Emancipirte, Op. 282 1:30:26
    31. Accelerationen, Op. 234 1:33:51
    32. Bitte schon!, Op. 372 1:41:37
    33. Tik-Tak-Polka, Op. 365 1:45:41
    34. Ohne Sorgen, Op. 271 1:48:26
    35. Im Fluge, Op. 230 1:50:06
    36. Extempore, Op. 241 1:51:55
    37. Freikugeln, Op. 326 1:55:08
    38. Rudolfsheimer-Polka, Op. 152 1:57:58

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  • Strauss II - Greatest Waltzes Collection

    2:25:57

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    STRAUSS II
    Greatest Waltzes Collection

    01 Schatz-Walzer (Treasure Waltz) Op. 418 00:00
    02 Rosen aus dem Süden (Roses from the South) Op. 388 08:25
    03 Frühlingsstimmen (Voices of Spring), Op. 410 18:07
    04 Wein, Weib und Gesang (Wine, Women and Song) Op. 333 25:40
    05 An der Schonen Blauen Donau (On the Beautiful Blue Danube) Op. 314 31:18
    06 Kaiser Walzer (Emperor Waltz), Op. 437 42:42
    07 Wiener Bonbons (Vienna Sweets) Waltz Op. 307 54:36
    08 Wo die Citronen Blüh'n! (Where the Lemon Trees Bloom), Op. 364 1:04:02
    09 Seid umschlungen, Millionen! (Be Embraced, You Millions!) Waltz Op. 443 1:13:48
    10 Accellerationen (Accelerations) Waltz, Op. 234 1:23:49
    11 Künstlerleben (Artist’s Life) Op. 316 1:32:44
    12 Morgenblätter (Morning Journals), Op. 279 1:43:10
    13 Wiener Blut (Viennese Blood) Op. 354 1:54:20
    14 Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald (Tales from the Vienna Woods) Op. 325 2:03:36
    15 Liebeslieder (Love Songs) Op. 114 2:16:24

    1, 4, 8-13: performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    2, 3, 6 & 14: performed by Vilnius Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    5 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    15 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    #classicalmusic #classical #straussii

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  • The Best of Strauss

    2:43

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    THE BEST OF STRAUSS II

    01. Emperor Waltz (Kaiser-Walzer) Op. 437 00:00
    02. Strauss I - Radetzky March Op. 228 11:57
    03. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen) Waltz, Op. 410 14:54
    04. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der Schönen Blauen Donau) Waltz, Op. 314 21:49
    05. Chit-Chat (Tritsch-Tratsch) Polka, Op. 214 32:42
    06. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 35:21
    07. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons) Waltz, Op. 307 44:10
    08. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz, Op. 325 53:46
    09. Love Songs (Liebeslieder) Waltz, Op. 114 1:06:20
    10. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden) Waltz, Op. 388 1:15:10
    11. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz, Op. 443 1:24:26
    12. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz, Op. 234 1:33:56
    13. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 1:42:55
    14. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka, Op. 139 1:52:21
    15. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 234 1:55:06
    16. Polka Schnell, Op. 281 1:57:49

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    #classicalmusic #classical #waltz #strauss

  • Strauss Jr - STRAUSS THE BEST OF MARCHES

    51:39

    STRAUSS THE BEST OF MARCHES

    1. Egyptischer Marsch, Op. 353 00:00
    2. Wettrennen-Galopp, Op. 29a 4:00
    3. Radetzky-Marsch, Op. 228 5:53
    4. Spanischer Marsch, Op. 433 8:50
    5. Napoleon-Marsch, Op. 156 13:33
    6. Sperl-Galopp, Op. 42 16:21
    7. Banditen-Galopp, Op. 378 18:23
    8. Russischer Marsch, Op. 426 20:37
    9. Mit Extrapost, Op. 259 24:00
    10. Persischer Marsch. Op. 289 55:59
    11. Delirien, Op. 212 27:57
    12. Orpheus-Quadrille, Op. 236 36:08
    13. Schutzen-Quadrille 42:14
    14. Aufs Korn, Op. 478 49:05

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  • Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz

    10:59

    Disscuss/Review The Blue Danube Waltz at

    Title : Johann Strauss II , The Blue Danube Waltz
    Date : 1867

    From Wikipedia,The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau op. 314 (On the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by Johann Strauss II, composed in 1867. Originally performed 9 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men's Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success, however, and Strauss is reputed to have said The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda -- I wish that had been a success!

    The waltz originally had an accompanying song text written by Josef Weyl. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World's Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion.

    The sentimental Viennese connotations of the piece have made it into a sort of unofficial Austrian national anthem. It is a traditional encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year's Concert. The first few bars are also the interval signal of Osterreich Rundfunk's overseas programs.

    It is reported by composer Norman Lloyd in his Golden Encyclopedia of Music that when asked by Frau Strauss for an autograph, the composer Johannes Brahms autographed Mrs. Strauss's fan by writing on it the first few bars of the Blue Danube. Under it he wrote Unfortunately not by Johannes Brahms.The work commences with an extended introduction in the key of A major with shimmering (tremolo) violins and a French horn spelling out the familiar waltz theme, answered by staccato wind chords, in a subdued mood. It rises briefly into a loud passage but quickly dies down into the same restful nature of the opening bars. A contrasting and quick phrase in D major anticipates the waltz before 3 quiet downward-moving bass notes usher in the first principal waltz melody.

    The first waltz theme is familiar gently rising triad motif in cellos and horns in the tonic D major, accompanied by harps; the Viennese waltz beat is accentuated at the end of each 3-note phrase. The Waltz 1A triumphantly ends its rounds of the motif, and waltz 1B follows in the same key; the genial mood is still apparent.

    Waltz 2A glides in quietly (still in D major) before a short contrasting middle section in B flat major. The entire section is repeated.

    A more dour waltz 3A is introduced in G major before a fleeting eighth-note melodic phrase (waltz 3B). An loud Intrada (introduction) is then played. Waltz 4A starts off in a romantic mood (F major) before a more joyous waltz 4B in the same key.

    After another short Intrada in A, cadencing in F-sharp minor, sonorous clarinets spell out the poignant melody of waltz 5A in A. Waltz 5B is the climax, punctuated by cymbal crashes. Each of these may be repeated at the discretion of the performer.

    The coda recalls earlier sections (3A and 2A) before furious chords usher in a recap of the romantic Waltz 4A. The idyll is cut short as the waltz hurries back to the famous waltz theme 1A again. This statement is cut short, however, by the final codetta: a variation of 1A is presented, connecting to a rushing eighth-note passage in the final few bars: repeated tonic chords underlined by a snare drumroll and a bright-sounding flourish.

  • Johann Strauss II - An der schönen, blauen Donau - Walzer, Op. 314

    9:40

    It is interesting to reflect that Johann Strauss II's An der schönen blauen Donau (By the beautiful blue Danube), the most famous of all orchestral waltzes, was conceived and first performed as a showpiece for male voice choir. The work was Johann's first choral waltz, written as a commission for the Wiener Mannergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) with whom he was to enjoy a close association over the years, creating for the choir a total of six choral master waltzes, two polkas and a march.

    Strauss began sketching themes for the waltz, which would eventually bear the title An der schönen blauen Donau, in autumn 1866, and originally submitted to the Association a four-part unaccompanied chorus comprising just four waltz sections and a brief Coda, but without Introduction. A hastily written piano accompaniment followed soon afterwards, and then a fifth waltz section. The orchestral accompaniment, together with the distinctive Introduction, was provided only shortly before the first performance which took place at Vienna's Dianabad-Saal ballroom during the Association's Faschings-Liedertafel (Carnival Programme of Songs) on 15 February 1867. In the absence of the composer, who was appearing with the Strauss Orchestra at the Imperial Court on the night of the première, the members of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein were conducted by their chorus-master, Rudolf Weinwurm, and accompanied by the orchestra of the 'Georg V, König von Hannover' Infantry Regiment No. 42, which was temporarily stationed in Vienna. The original, satirical, text had been furnished by the Association's own 'house poet', Josef Weyl (1821-95), although a new text was added in 1890 by Franz von Gernerth (1821-1900) which was more suited to non-carnival occasions and commenced with the now familiar words: Donau so blau ... (Danube so blue...)

    The Viennese were treated to the first purely orchestral rendition of An der schönen blauen Donau - complete with Introduction and full-length Coda - on Sunday 10 March 1867 in the Volksgarten at the Strauss Orchestra's annual Carnival Revue, which took the form a Benefit Concert by Josef and Eduard Strauss, with the participation of Johann Strauss, Imperial-Royal Court Ball Music Director. This date is further confirmed by an entry in Josef Strauss's diary. Johann himself conducted this performance of his waltz, which featured as the third item on a programme presenting no less than twenty-four novelties composed for that year's carnival celebrations by the three Strauss brothers. Perhaps surprisingly, in view of the unanimous praise lavished by the Viennese press upon the choral première of the work, the orchestral version of An der schönen blauen Donau did not attract special attention from the critics, the Neues Fremden-Blatt (11.03.1867) merely noting that every piece met with the most undivided applause, which now and then increased to tempestuous enthusiasm, and everything had to be repeated. The three brothers celebrated in this concert the greatest triumph in the sphere of Viennese dance music.

    During the 1867 Carnival, An der schönen blauen Donau was merely regarded as a pearl amongst many others, and only a little later did the unique position which it was to assume, and maintain, as the unofficial national anthem of both Vienna and Austria, become evident. The new waltz was in the composer's luggage which he took with him to Paris in summer 1867, where it was played on 28 May at the glittering Austrian Embassy Ball given by the Ambassador, Prince Richard Metternich, and his wife, Princess Pauline, benefiting considerably from an attendance by the élite of international society. An Englishwoman who was present at this event, Mrs Charles Moulton (later Madame de Hegermann-Lindencrone), wrote home enthusiastically the following day: The famous Johann Strauss, brought from Vienna especially for this occasion, stood waiting with uplifted baton and struck up the 'Blue Danube', heard for the first time in Paris... And how Strauss played it!... With what fire and 'entrain'!. It did not take long for the reputation of the work to spread much further afield, and on 1 July 1867 Theodore Thomas conducted its first American performance in New York with his own orchestra, an ensemble which later became the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. A little less than twelve weeks later, on 21 September 1867, the composer conducted the British première of the work (in a choral version with a 100-strong male voice choir) at London's Royal Italian Opera House, Covent Garden, afterwards noting in his diary: tremendous tumult and rejoicing!!!.

    Conductor: Franz Welser-Most
    Orchestra: London Philarmonic Orchestra

  • Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    8:31

    Discuss/review/recommend the work at

    Title : Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    From Wikipedia,
    Die Fledermaus (in English: The Bat;' in French: La Chauve-souris') is an operetta composed by Johann Strauss II to a German libretto by Carl Haffner and Richard Genée.

    The original source for Die Fledermaus is a farce by German playwright Julius Roderich Benedix (1811--1873), Das Gefängnis (The Prison). Another source is a French vaudeville play, Le réveillon, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. This was first translated by Carl Haffner into a non-musical play to be produced in Vienna. However, the peculiarly French custom of the réveillon (a midnight supper party) caused problems, which were solved by the decision to adapt the play as a libretto for Johann Strauss, with the réveillon replaced by a Viennese ball. At this point Haffner's translation was handed over for adaptation to Richard Genée, who subsequently claimed not only that he had made a fresh translation from scratch but that he had never even met Haffner.

    The operetta premièred on April 5, 1874 at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna, Austria and has been part of the regular operetta repertoire ever since. It currently appears as number 19 on Opera America's list of the 20 most-performed operatic works in North America.

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  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, op. 410

    6:00

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

  • Johann Strauss II - Wine, Women and Song Waltz

    6:15

    Wein, Weib und Gesang! - a particular favourite with Richard Wagner - was given its first performance by the Wiener Männergesang-Verein at their carnival-time 'Narrenabend' (Fools' Evening) held in the Dianabad-Saal, Vienna, on 2 February 1869. The Strauss Orchestra provided the accompaniment, and although the composer did not conduct the première of his new waltz, he was present among the audience, dressed as a pilgrim, while the members of the chorus were attired as negro slaves! Such was the enormous success of the première that Strauss was called for after the Introduction and each successive waltz section, whereupon he mounted the rostrum and blessed his admiring public. The new waltz was dedicated in friendship to Johann Ritter von Herbeck (1831-77), Imperial Royal Court Conductor, who had served the Association as chorus-master from 1856 to 1866 and who had recently been decorated with the 'Knight's Cross of the Order of Emperor Franz Josef', but this carnival performance was conducted by Herbeck's successor as chorus-master, Rudolf Weinwurm. Wein, Weib und Gesang! met with unanimous praise from the press, the general view being summarised by the Vorstadt-Zeitung (4.02.1869) which feit it belongs to the best that the composer has written for a long time. In similar vein, the Neues Wiener Tagblatt (4.02.1869) opined: The waltz will make its way in life and will become just as popular as the piece 'An der schönen blauen Donau'. The Introduction is a little musical masterwork ... That the waltz had to be repeated by demand goes without saying.

    As a purely orchestral number, the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang! appeared for the first time on the programme of a Grand Promenade Concert given on 16 March 1869 by the Strauss Orchestra under the joint direction of Johann, Josef and Eduard Strauss in Pest, where the three brothers had travelled for two concert engagements at the Redoutensaal. Not until Easter Monday, 29 March, did Vienna hear the orchestral version of Wein, Weib und Gesang! This performance, a Promenade Concert given by Josef and Eduard Strauss in aid of the Home for the Blind and the City Crèche, with the participation of Johann Strauss, took place in the decorative Blumen-Säle der Wiener Gartenbaugesellschaft (Floral Halls of the Vienna Horticultural Society), and marked the penultimate appearance of Johann and Josef Strauss before they departed for their summer season of concerts in Russia. Before long the delights of Wein, Weib und Gesang! were gaining it admirers elsewhere in Europe and beyond, and on 20 July 1869 the first American performance took place in New York with Theodore Thomas conducting his own orchestra, an ensemble which later became the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

  • Strauss ~ The Blue Danube Waltz

    9:24

    Classical music : Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz op. 314 - With paintings slideshow background

    The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (German for By the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II, composed in 1866.

    All the paintings in this video are in the public domain

    Thank you for watching! Have a great day! :)

  • Johann Strauss II: Die Fledermaus / Carlos Kleiber

    1:46:06

    Personnel:
    Hermann Prey, baritone
    Julia Varady, soprano
    Lucia Popp, soprano
    René Kollo, tenor
    Ivan Rebroff, bass
    Bernd Weikl, baritone
    Bayerischer Staatsopernchor
    Bayerisches Staatsorchester
    Carlos Kleiber, conductor

    Digitally remastered. Source: FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz

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  • Johann Strauss jr.: Ouverture from Waldmeister conducted by Erich Leinsdorf

    10:12

    Erich Leinsdorf conducts the Vienna Symphony Orchestra (Wiener Symphoniker)

  • Johann Strauss II - Voices of Spring Waltz

    5:33

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

    In its purely orchestral version the Frühlingsstimmen Walzer was played for the first time on 18 March 1883 when the composer's brother, Eduard Strauss, conducted it with the Strauss Orchestra at one of his regular Sunday afternoon concerts in the Goldene Saal (Golden Hall) of the Musikverein building in Vienna. This première also met with great success and the waltz had to be encored.

  • Johann Strauss Jr.s Overtures - Blindekuh

    9:37

    Johann Strauss II - Blind Man's Buff (1878).

    On 15 June 1876 - even before the premiére of Johann Strauss's operetta Prinz Methusalem (Carl-Theater, 3 January 1877) - the Viennese Fremden-Blatt newspaper informed its readers that the following season's repertoire (i.e. autumn 1876 to summer 1877) at the Theater an der Wien would include a new operetta by the Waltz King entitled Blinde Kuh. The report correctly stated that the stage work was based on a comedy by the German actor, dramatist and theatre director Rudolf Kneisel (1831-99), with song texts by the ever-reliable Richard Genée (1823-95), but was incorrect in announcing that it was scheduled for early December 1876. As Jetty Strauss, Johann's first wife, was to write on 6 September 1876 to Victor Wilder (1835-92), the French co-librettist of Prinz Methusalem (Prince Methuselah): Jean [Johann] won't any longer permit 'Blinde Kuh' to be performed during this season [i.e. autumn 1876 to summer 1877]; on the contrary he has the plan (the idea) to give it first in Paris, since the piece is amusing and he has written enchanting music [for it].

    Johann's plan, as detailed by Jetty, failed to transpire. Instead, the composer remained extremely busy working towards the premières of Prinz Methusalem and La Tzigane (the French adaptation of Die Fledermaus, mounted in Paris on 30 October 1877). Then, after Jetty's sudden death on 8 April 1878, Johann set aside work on Blindekuh for a while, and only completed it with a new woman at his side - his second wife, Angelika (née Dittrich). Not until 17 November 1878 could the Fremden-Blatt report that Strauss's 'Blinde Kuh' is finished and in the possession of the management, and the new work finally reached the stage of the Theater an der Wien on 18 December 1878 - two years after its anticipated première. After a performance lasting three hours, and in spite of some applause for the music, one thing was certain: the public had witnessed a failure. As the journal Hans Jörgel (1872, Volume 52) opined: Individual charming blooms of melody floated in the slough of banality and popular song, a superfluity of reminiscences. As a true-hearted friend one must say, the opera was a roaring - failure. Theatre director Maximilian Steiner (1830-80) had apparently acquired Kneisel's comedy without the author's knowledge, and when the operetta proved beyond salvaging even by extensive reworking Strauss abandoned it with relative equanimity.

    Rather unusually for a Strauss overture, that for Blindekuh was heard in advance of the operetta's first stage performance. As is clear from an announcement which firs t appeared in Vienna's Morgen-Post newspaper on 4 December 1878, the composer made his Blindekuh Overture available for an academy of the Vienna Authors' and Journalists' Association, 'Concordia', to be held in the Theater an der Wien on 9 December 1878. The proceeds from this charity musical event were promised for the pension fund of the 'Concordia' and Johann had agreed to conduct his overture personally. As could have been anticipated, Vienna's pressmen reported extensively on their own trade association's festivity, and most included mention of the Waltz King's particular contribution. The reviewer for the Illustrirtes Wiener Extrablatt (10.12.1878) concentrated on the reaction of the audience to the musical novelty: Greeted with tempestuous applause, Johann Strauss stepped up to the conductor's rostrum. Barely a minute later, dainty fingers could be seen strumming on the sills of the boxes and in the stalls heads swayed to-and-fro like water lilies enjoying delightful thoughts. A teasing polka and a roguish waltz play blind man's buff [= Blindekuh] with each other in Strauss's overture; they seek to play tag, to hold on to each other - a wonderful game - in which the public joined with such delight that Strauss had to repeat the whale overture. A large laurel wreath was presented to the maestro. The verdict of the Fremden-Blatt (10.12.1878) was no less favourable. It is a richly-instrumented capriccio with an effective crescendo, bringing together melodies of a truly Straussian character which we shall find again in the eagerly awaited new operetta by the Viennese maestro.

    Sadly, the eagerly awaited Blindekuh did not match the public's expectation of the piece. This, together with the generally unfavourable reviews which followed the opening night, led to the new stage work surviving only a total of sixteen performances. Strauss bore the failure badly. On Thursday 26 December 1878 he made an appearance at the Musikverein to conduct the première public concert performance of the operetta's overture at his brother Eduard's promenade concert with the Strauss Orchestra. Once again the piece enjoyed a complete triumph.

  • JONC Alevins - Perpetuum Mobile de Johann Strauss Jr.,

    5:58

    Jove Orquestra Nacional de Catalunya
    Dani Cubero, concertino
    Concert realitzat a l'Auditori de Barcelona el 3 de Gener 2013

    Direcció de vídeo, Igor Cortadellas
    Técnic de so, Lluís Soler

  • Johann Strauss II - Rosen aus dem Süden - Walzer, Op. 388

    9:01

    It was an eventful evening; the house was filled to the gables in order to hear a new work by our Strauss, for Strauss enjoys the increasingly rare title 'our' which is the ultimate superlative for an artist:

    Positive = Herr Strauss
    Comparative = Strauss
    Superlative = Our Strauss!

    So wrote the Fremdenblatt newspaper (3 October) in its review of the highly successful première of Johann Strauss's operetta Das Spitzentuch der Königin ('The Queen's Lace Handkerchief'), which opened at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on 1 October 1880. The composer himself, though delighted by the reception accorded his latest stage work, was unconvinced that it would enjoy a lasting success. But he had no such doubts about the magnificent orchestral waltz, Rosen aus dem Süden, which he had hurriedly assembled from themes in his operetta, and whose piano edition his publisher, Cranz, was able to advertise in the press (together with the first Spitzentuch potpourri) just four days after the theatrical première! The honour of conducting the first performance of Rosen aus dem Süden fell to Johann's brother, Eduard, who was still on a concert tour of Germany when Spitzentuch received its première.

    Not until 7 November, therefore, at Eduard's Sunday afternoon concert in the Musikverein, did the waltz begin its triumphant conquest of the world, comprising, as it did, many of the musical highlights from the operetta. Two numbers which had drawn especial praise from the Spitzentuch first-night reviewers were the King's Act 1 Trüffel-Couplet (Stets kommt mir wieder in den Sinn -- the refrain of which Strauss claimed he had rewritten twelve times!) and Cervantes's Act 2 Romance, Wo die wilde Rose erblüht, and these both appear in Rosen aus dem Süden, as Waltz 1 and Waltz 2A respectively.

    Of interest is the publication by Cranz, in October 1880, of two separate piano editions of Rosen aus dem Süden. The first issue bears no dedication and has a title page illustration showing roses and palm branches interwoven in a lace handkerchief. The second, which introduces slight modifications to the musical score and features on its cover a rose-entwined veranda and a volcano -- presumably Vesuvius -- is dedicated by the composer in deepest respect to his Majesty Humbert I, King of Italy.

  • Johann Strauss II - Tales from the Vienna Woods Waltz

    11:01

    The decorative first piano edition of Johann Strauss's evocative waltz Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald carries the composer's respectful dedication to his Highness Prince Constantin Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (1828-1896), and the work was almost certainly given its world première at a private soirée in the prince's 16th-century palace in the Augarten, Vienna, during summer 1868. An undated letter from that year, written to the composer by Princess Marie Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, reads: Dear Sir, The performance of your beautiful waltz gave me such pleasure recently -- that I cannot help asking you kindly to accept a small memento of the unforgettable evening. It is to remind you of another of your finely-chiselled masterpieces, by the blue Danube -- whose sound reminds us all of happy hours. With repeated thanks and greatest respect. Fürstin zu Hohenlohe. (The nature of the Princess's memento is unfortunately not known). Since May 1867 Prince Constantin had held the position of First Master of the Royal Household and had lived in the Augarten residence with his wife Marie (née Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein), the daughter of Franz Liszt's long-term mistress Princess Carolyne Wittgenstein. Through Marie's connections the Augarten Palace, situated on the opposite side of the Danube Canal from the inner city of Vienna, became a focal point of cultural life in the Austrian capital. (After the Second World War it became, and has remained, the home of the Vienna Boys' Choir).

    On 22 June 1868 Johann Strauss conducted a public performance of Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald before an audience of five thousand at the 'Sommerliedertafel' (Summer Song Programme) of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) held in Karl Schwender's 'Neue Welt' entertainment establishment in the Vienna suburb of Hietzing. Yet this was no public première: three days earlier in the Volksgarten, at an 'Extraordinary Novelty Festival with Fireworks, for the Benefit of Josef and Eduard Strauss' on 19 June, Johann himself conducted the new work to great applause and was obliged to repeat it four times. A particularly strong impression was made by the waltz's expansive Introduction of 122 bars, a rustic tone-poem evocative of the countryside of the Wienerwald, the wooded eastern foothills of the Alps, situated just north-west of Vienna. It is curious to reflect, therefore, that at no time in his life did the composer himself undertake walks in the Vienna Woods -- indeed, he expressed a lifelong fear of climbing even the most gentle of hills! Through the use of zither (replaced on this recording by an optional string ensemble) and Ländler-style rhythms in the Introduction and Coda, Strauss emphasises the close ties between the Viennese Waltz and the peasant music of Lower Austria. A zither-player pictured in a vignette on the cover of the first piano edition further underlines this connection, while the artist also depicts other commonplace scenes and pleasures to be enjoyed in the countryside -- shooting on a rifle range, a pair of lovers enjoying rural seclusion, and young men bowling at an outdoor skittle alley.

  • Johann Strauss - El Danubio Azul

    10:06

    Johann Strauss - El Danubio Azul

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  • The Blue Danube Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr

    9:56

    The Blue Danube Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr

  • Johann Strauss - Wiener Blut, Waltz

    9:06

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Wiener Blut, Waltz

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Johann Strauss II - Pizzicato Polka

    2:48

    The second of the Strauss brothers, Josef (1827-70), had been the first to tread the path of matrimony. Though very happily married since 1857, Josef constantly strove to become financially independent so he could break free from the oppressive confines of the Strauss family apartments in the massive 'Hirschenhaus' in Leopoldstadt and establish a home of his own with his wife and daughter. This possibility appeared to him to advance a step closer when, in 1868, brother Johann reached agreement with the management of the St Petersburg Tsarskoye-Selo Railway Company for Josef and himself to share the conducting of concerts at Pavlovsk during the summer months of 1869.

    The two Strauss brothers were accompanied on their 1869 venture to Russia by Johann's wife, Jetty (1818-78), whose letters home show that the underlying disharmony which had long existed between 'Jean' (Johann) and 'Pepi' (Josef) had largely given way to a spirit of mutual co-operation. As the two musical directors were now able to divide the workload of rehearsing and conducting the orchestra, both had sufficient time to compose. On 13 June 1869 (= 1 June, Russian calendar), Jetty wrote from Pavlovsk to Josef¡¦s wife Caroline (1831-1900) in Vienna: Pepi & Jean are now writing a polka together - that again will be something new. Almost twenty-three years later, on 1 April 1892, Johann detailed in a letter to his publisher Fritz Simrock the events which had culminated in this fraternal collaboration: I advised my brother Josef - so that he could secure the St Petersburg engagement (I have been there 10 times and earned a lot of money) [-] to compose something which would catch on in St Petersburg, and suggested he should prepare a pizzicato polka. He did not want to do it - he was always indecisive - finally I proposed to him that the polka should be created by the two of us. He agreed, and just look - the polka caused a furore in the true sense of the word.

    Johann Strauss was not exaggerating. The records kept by the diarist F.A. Zimmermann, a viola-player in the 47-strong orchestra at Pavlovsk, show clearly that the work was played no less than nine times on the evening it was first introduced to the Russian public - 24 June 1869 (= 12 June). One can only guess at the scenes which must have ensued as the public demonstrated its wild enthusiasm for this novelty item which, according to Johann, was the very first of its kind. (Léo Delibes's famous Pizzicato-Polka for his ballet Sylvia, ou La Nymphe de Diane was not heard until 1876.) In view of the work's success, it is strange that Johann and Josef omitted the Pizzicato-Polka from their next eleven concerts and only reintroduced it at their benefit performance on 6 July 1869 (= 24 June), when the piece had to be played a total of seven times. At subsequent performances during the remainder of the Pavlovsk season, the Pizzicato-Polka continued to exert its extraordinary effect upon the public.

    Outside the lands of the Tsar, the Pizzicato-Polka began its conquest of the world when Josef Strauss conducted its Viennese première on 14 November 1869 during the first of his promenade concerts that season with the Strauss Orchestra at the Sofienbad-Saal. In addition to the Pizzicato-Polka - which was given by a quartet of players - Josef also introduced the first Viennese performances of three other works written by him for that year's Pavlovsk concerts: Ohne Sorgen! Polka schnell op. 271, Frohes Leben, Walzer op. 272 and En passant, Polka française op. 273.

  • Frühlingsstimmen op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    5:48

    Frühlingsstimmen, walzer op. 410 (Voices of Spring). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).

  • VITA DARTISTA - Johann Strauss Jr. , arr. Lorenzo Pusceddu

    9:55

    Concert Band

    Performance: Orchestra di Fiati Fiatinsieme
    Conductor: Enea Tonetti

  • Johann Strauss Jr.s Overtures - Der Carneval in Rom

    6:21

    Johann Strauss II - The Carnival in Rome (1873).

    After the considerable success of Johann Strauss's début stage work, Indigo und die vierzig Räuber (1871), the Viennese public had to wait more than two years before the composer once again appeared at the Theater an der Wien with his second theatrical offering, a three-act comic operetta entitled Der Carneval in Rom (The Carnival in Rome). Based on the play Piccolino by the versatile French dramatist Victorien Sardou (1831-1908), the libretto for the new Strauss piece was the work of Josef Braun (1840-1902), the librettist of an earlier and unfinished Strauss operetta, Die lustigen Weiber von Wien (1868). Strauss began composing Der Carneval in Rom around the turn of the year 1871/72, but its progress was hampered by his involvement in a number of other projects, including his appearances at the World's Peace Jubilee and International Musical Festival at Boston, USA, during summer 1872. Just as he had done with Indigo, Johann was able to rely on the assistance of the theatrically-experienced composer and librettist Richard Genée (1823-95) when composing Der Carneval in Rom.

    According to one newspaper journalist, the first night of Der Carneval in Rom on 1 March 1873 was a sort of Viennese party-night, which brought about an uninterrupted succession of glittering ovations for the popular composer ... The success must be called complete. Ludwig Speidel, writing in the Fremden-Blatt (2.03.1873), made the interesting observation that Strauss has lavished an abundance of motifs on his new work, and whereas in 'Indigo' there was still the mania for flattering the ear through the most irresistible waltz melodies and for dazzling the audience with thrilling dance tunes, the score of 'Carneval in Rom' reveals finer and more tender depths in a direction that is, perhaps, less popular, but definitely more noble. The popular undertones, so light on the ear, have not been neglected by the composer, and thus his work falls into two parts, of which the one retains the exciting rhythmical tempo of comic operetta, while the second moves into the style of lyric opera.

    The arresting Vivo bars which commence the overture to Der Carneval in Rom are taken from the opening chorus of the Act 3 Finale (No. 16) (Carneval, dich preisen wir mit Jubelschall / 'Carnival, we praise you with the sound of rejoicing'), while the Moderato section which follows is based on the Bühnenmusik (stage music) in the Entr'acte to Act 3 (No. 13) and in No. 15a. These two musical ideas then reappear, developing and modulating and working towards a cheerful Andantino con moto passage taken from a short duet (Ach, nach unserm trauten Stübchen / 'Ah, to our dear little room') for Therese and Franz in the Act 1 Finale (No. 4). A Poco animato linking passage follows, again based on notes from the opening vivo bars, leading into an Allegro non troppo section presenting music from Arthur's solo at the beginning of the Act 2 Finale (No. 12) There follows a Moderato section based on the accompaniment of the Act 2 Duet (No. 15) for Marie and Arthur, and then an Allegretto passage from the Act 2 Quintet (No. 8) sung by Arthur to the words Ach! der Gott, der die Triebe der Freude / 'Ah! the god who [implanted] the impulses of joy'. This section continues with the orchestral accompaniment from the Act 2 Finale (No. 12) ensemble, with male chorus words Das ist der Ehemnnn, Discretion / 'That is the husband, discretion'. The Allegro vivace final section of the overture again returns to the Act 2 Quintet (No. 8), specifically to the Più mosso ensemble section with the words Ja, harren will ich an dem Ort / 'Yes, I want to linger at this place'.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the first performance of Der Carneval in Rom at the Theater an der Wienon 1 March 1873. The composer left it to his brother, Eduard Strauss, to present the first concert performance of the operetta's overture on 25 March 1873 during a promenade concert with the Strauss Orchestra in the Musikverein. This concert also featured the first concert performance of the ballet music from Der Carneval in Rom.

  • Johann Strauss II - Wiener Blut - Walzer, Op. 354

    8:59

    On 20 April 1873, the Archduchess Gisela Louise Maria (1856-1932), eldest daughter of the Austrian Emperor Franz Josef and the Empress Elisabeth, married Prince Leopold of Bavaria (1846-1930) in Vienna. To commemorate this major occasion a series of glittering festivities was arranged around the date of the Imperial wedding, including a Court Ball in the Hofburg Palace and a festival in the Prater, and the most important organisations of the nobility and citizenry, as well as the authorities of the City of Vienna itself, vied with each other in the organising of numerous celebrations and festive events.

    For their part, the personnel of the Wiener Hof-Operntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre) devised a very special attraction and announced for 22 April 1873 a Court Opera Ball - a forerunner of the present-day Vienna Opera Ball - the proceeds from which were destined for the theatre's Pensions Institute, which arranged the event. However, since at this time the Austrian Emperor was unprepared to sanction dancing in the Hof-Operntheater, which he looked upon as 'his' opera house, the event was instead held in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein building - home of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Society of the Friends of Music) and today the setting for the annual New Year's Day Concerts of the Vienna Philharmonic. As hosts of the Court Opera Ball, the artistes of the Hof-Operntheater were keen to present themselves as favourably as possible to their public, and so offered their guests a particularly beguiling programme. They engaged the Strauss Orchestra and its conductor, 'Court Ball Music Director' Eduard Strauss, to provide the music for dancing, but withheld their pièce de résistance until around midnight, when a break in proceedings of one hour¡¦s duration was announced for the benefit of both orchestra and dancers.

    Now the highlight of the evening was revealed as the resident orchestra of the Vienna Court Opera, the Vienna Philharmonic, presented a short concert of music. Since the Director of the Wiener Philharmoniker, Johann Herbeck, had been taken ill shortly before the ball, the first item - Carl Maria von Weber's Aufforderung zum Tanz (Invitation to the Dance), in Hector Berlioz's orchestration - was conducted by Otto Dessoff, who at that time was also leader of the Philharmonic Concerts. The critic of the Fremden-Blatt (24.04.1873) observed of this performance that it was played with such verve and precision that perhaps nobody will be able to recall having heard this piece of music better [played]. The journalist continued: After this, Johann Strauss stepped up to the conductor's podium to perform his latest waltz, 'Wiener Blut'. We do not believe that we are overstating our praise if we count this work amongst the best by the beloved Waltz King. This dance piece is a collection of genuine Viennese tunes, full of melody and electrifying rhythm. On tempestuous demand the waltz had to be repeated. The reviewer for the Neues Wiener Tagblatt (23.04.1873) was equally enthusiastic, numbering the waltz Wiener Blut amongst the most beautiful which Strauss has written in recent years. In these three-four bars, sometimes cheeky, sometimes sentimental, flows fresh, free and red Viennese blood.

    This performance of the waltz Wiener Blut, on the night of 22/23 April 1873, marked the first occasion on which the Viennese Waltz King conducted the renowned Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and thus also the commencement of the orchestra's 'Strauss tradition'. (Some six months later, on 4 November 1873, the Wiener Philharmoniker would cement this relationship still further when, under the composer's direction, they performed Strauss's waltz An der schönen blauen Donau for the very first time at a concert in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein, hosted by the Committee of the Chinese World Exhibition.)

  • Johann Strauss Jr.s Overtures - Prinz Methusalem

    5:45

    Johann Strauss II - Prince Methuselah (1877).

    Undoubtedly prompted by the considerable success enjoyed by La Reine Indigo, Johann conceived the idea to compose a genuine 'French operetta' for the Viennese stage. Because the Theater an der Wien, after much speculation, had finally gone bankrupt (it remained closed from mid May to early September 1875), the director of the rival Carl-Theater, Franz Jauner (1832-1900) - apparently after clandestine negotiations with Strauss's wife, Jetty - seized his opportunity to secure Johann Strauss for his own theatre. It is evident that the widely-reported financial instability of the Theater an der Wien had led the astute Jetty to contact Jauner, and in her letter of 15 November 1875 she was able to inform Jacques Heugel (1815-83), the publisher of Strauss's works in Paris: Director Jauner has bought an opera text from Wilder and Delacour, which Jean [= Johann] is composing for the Carltheater. The subject is very witty and the verses are such that Jean won't put them down. He has already set a quarter of the operetta, which Wilder will revise. Now, he would prefer if it [= the operetta] were to be first performed in Paris, and that is what Jauner would like too; eight days later one could perform the work in Vienna.

    In truth, the libretto submitted in French by Victor Wilder and Alfred Delacour (real name: Alfred Charlemagne Lartigue, 1815-83) had to be skillfully revised and translated by the actor Carl Treumann (1824-77) before the operetta - eventually entitled Prinz Methusalem - could reach production. This shortcoming did not, however, prevent Strauss from making headway with the composition, even though he himself spoke no French and presumably had to rely heavily on Jetty's knowledge of the language. On 18 November 1876 the Fremden-Blatt reported that Strauss had handed over the score of Methusalem (as the operetta was then still called) to the management of the Carl-Theater, and that the first performance was set for 5 January 1877.

    The world première of Prinz Methusalem actually took place on 3 January 1877, auspiciously three years to the day after the Carl-Theater had mounted the sensational first Viennese production of Charles Lecocq's opera-comique, La Fille de Madame Angot (1872), given under the title Angot, die Tochter der Halle. Johann Strauss himself conducted the first performance of his new operetta, while the breeches title rôle featured the popular Budapest-born soprano Antonie Link (1853-1931), already famous for creating the rôle of Fatinitza in Suppé's operetta (1876) of that name and later to gain even greater celebrity in the title role of another Suppé operetta, Boccaccio (1879). Although Johann had strewn his latest stage work with a plethora of enchanting melodies, it did not find critical acclaim. Nevertheless, due largely to the sterling efforts of performers including Josef Matras (1832-87), Carl Blasel (1831-1922) and Wilhelm Knaack (1829-94), Prinz Methusalem achieved a respectable run of 80 performances. The critic for the Illustrirtes Wiener Extrablatt (5.01.1877) observed trenchantly in his first night review. The Viennese composer par excellence wanted to bring off a French work; he wanted to become Offenbach the Second, but he remained Strauss the First. Much as he may have wanted to, he was unable to deny his own artistic individuality, and like a comforting beam of sunlight his original talent broke through the little clouds which had been conjured up from alien zones, and it warmed and electrified his admirers. In contrast, the Viennese journal Hans Jörgel (Volume 6, 1877) condemned the new operetta out of hand: French megalomania is beginning to addle his [Strauss's] brain, and he antagonises the people who wrote him the librettos for 'Indigo', 'Carneval in Rom', 'Fledermaus' and 'Cagliostro', and has a Frenchman write the insipid libretto for 'Prinz Methusalem' which, in spite of the expert stagecraft shown in Treumann's adaptation, has made this latest opera by our favourite into the least of all he has written!.

    On 14 January 1877, eleven days after Johann Strauss had first conducted his Prinz Methusalem Overture at the operetta's première in the Carl-Theater, Eduard Strauss introduced the novelty to the Viennese concert-going public at his Sunday promenade concert with the Strauss Orchestra in the Musikverein. Although the papers carried no reviews the response must have been encouraging, for thereafter the overture frequently featured in Eduard's concerts.

  • Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka - Johann Strauss II

    2:39

    Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, Polka schnell Op. 214 von Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)

  • Voices Of Spring Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr.

    5:56

    Voices Of Spring Waltz

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Johann Strauss II - Roses from the South Waltz

    8:50

    It was an eventful evening; the house was filled to the gables in order to hear a new work by our Strauss

    So wrote the Fremdenblatt newspaper (3 October) in its review of the highly successful première of Johann Strauss's operetta Das Spitzentuch der Königin ('The Queen's Lace Handkerchief'), which opened at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on 1 October 1880. The composer himself, though delighted by the reception accorded his latest stage work, was unconvinced that it would enjoy a lasting success. But he had no such doubts about the magnificent orchestral waltz, Rosen aus dem Süden, which he had hurriedly assembled from themes in his operetta, and whose piano edition his publisher, Cranz, was able to advertise in the press (together with the first Spitzentuch potpourri) just four days after the theatrical première! The honour of conducting the first performance of Rosen aus dem Süden fell to Johann's brother, Eduard, who was still on a concert tour of Germany when Spitzentuch received its première. Not until 7 November, therefore, at Eduard's Sunday afternoon concert in the Musikverein, did the waltz begin its triumphant conquest of the world, comprising, as it did, many of the musical highlights from the operetta. Two numbers which had drawn especial praise from the Spitzentuch first-night reviewers were the King's Act 1 Trüffel-Couplet (Stets kommt mir wieder in den Sinn -- the refrain of which Strauss claimed he had rewritten twelve times!) and Cervantes's Act 2 Romance, Wo die wilde Rose erblüht, and these both appear in Rosen aus dem Süden, as Waltz 1 and Waltz 2A respectively.

  • Johann Strauss II - Künstlerleben - Walzer, op. 316

    9:28

    Like the waltz An der schönen blauen Donau (By the beautiful blue Danube) op. 314, the waltz Künstler-Leben belongs to the dance music of 1867 which had the almost impossible task of injecting an element of gaiety and joie de vivre into that year's Vienna Carnival, and Viennese life in general, following the crippling shock of events during summer 1866 when Austria was overthrown by Prussian military supremacy at the Battle of Königgrätz. Many of the capital's grand 'Representation Balls' organised by the major professions and associations were cancelled, and the prevailing mood at those which did take place was, at least to begin with, lacklustre. As the chronicler of the Wiener Zeitung wrote at that time: Nowadays, nobody steps on to the smoothly polished parquet of the dance hall in a bright, witty or jocular frame of mind; everyone merely hopes to find the like there.

    The three Strauss brothers summoned their full creative powers in order to conjure up that immense jollity which, in happier times, had arisen spontaneously during carnival-time. They succeeded beyond all expectation -- especially so in the case of Johann and Josef -- by crafting a whole series of masterworks which re-awoke in the Viennese their lust for living. The waltz Künstler-Leben, which Johann Strauss himself conducted for the first time at the 'Hesperus' Ball in the Dianabad-Saal on 18 February 1867 -- just three nights after the première of An der schönen blauen Donau in the same venue -- was dedicated to the ball's organising committee, and paid homage to all those sculptors, painters, poets, authors, performers and musicians who had helped Vienna on its rise to prominence. The Vienna Artists' Association, 'Hesperus', to which belonged numerous renowned actors, singers, members of the great Viennese orchestras and choral associations as well as the leading writers of the age and, not least, all three Strauss brothers, only existed for a short time. Founded in 1859, this strictly apolitical gathering soon secured its place in Austria's musical life simply because Johann, Josef and Eduard Strauss showered its annual ball festivities with a cornucopia of delightful dance compositions. The sequence began with Johann's Hesperus-Polka op. 249, written for the modest first ball of the Society in 1861, and ended with Josef's waltz Hesperus-Klänge op. 279 for what proved to be the Society's last ball in 1870. Johann's waltz Künstler-Leben occupies a central position in this group of compositions. It was sketched out in the late autumn of 1866, at about the same time as An der schönen blauen Donau, and even contemporaries regarded Künstler-Leben as the distinguished twin of the popular Donauwalzer (Danube Waltz). At the time of the 1867 'Hesperus' Ball (to which Josef Strauss contributed the Jocus-Polka schnell op. 216 and Eduard the Apollo Polka française op. 25) it had already become a tradition that dance compositions written especially for such events by the Strauss brothers would first be played in a concert performance, usually during the interval, permitting the guests to listen attentively to the new work. Such pieces would be repeated later during the course of the ball, and only then would they be played for dancing. Thus it was with Künstler-Leben, whose ingenious Introduction belongs to the very best inspirations of its composer.

    Künstler-Leben at once established itself as a masterpiece of the 1867 Vienna Carnival, and when Strauss travelled to Paris at the end of May to commence a series of concerts, his wife, Jetty, who accompanied him, was able to enthuse in a letter to a friend in Vienna on 15 June about her husband's triumph in the French capital: Jean [Johann] plays all the favourite pieces now, and I couldn't tell you which please the most. The 'Donau', 'Morgenbl[ätter] 'Künstlerl[eben]', 'Wienerbonbons', 'Bürgerweisen', ditto -- 'Sinn', 'Flugschrift[en]', 'Carneval-Botsch[after]', 'Nachtfalter', these are already hits. 'Kaiserstadt', 'Prozess', 'Parforce', 'Annen' -- 'Maskenzug', 'train de plaisir', 'Tritsch[-Tratsch]' -- one pleases more than the other. They are simply crazy for this Viennese music.

  • Kaiser-Walzer - Johann Strauss

    10:54

    Herbert von Karajan

  • Perpetuum Mobile - A Musical Joke - Johann Strauss Jr.

    3:06

    Perpetuum Mobile - A Musical Joke

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Johann Strauss II - Vienna Blood Waltz

    7:07

    On 20 April 1873, the Archduchess Gisela Louise Maria (1856-1932), eldest daughter of the Austrian Emperor Franz Josef and the Empress Elisabeth, married Prince Leopold of Bavaria (1846-1930) in Vienna. To commemorate this major occasion a series of glittering festivities was arranged around the date of the Imperial wedding, including a Court Ball in the Hofburg Palace and a festival in the Prater, and the most important organisations of the nobility and citizenry, as well as the authorities of the City of Vienna itself, vied with each other in the organising of numerous celebrations and festive events.

    For their part, the personnel of the Wiener Hof-Operntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre) devised a very special attraction and announced for 22 April 1873 a Court Opera Ball - a forerunner of the present-day Vienna Opera Ball - the proceeds from which were destined for the theatre's Pensions Institute, which arranged the event. However, since at this time the Austrian Emperor was unprepared to sanction dancing in the Hof-Operntheater, which he looked upon as 'his' opera house, the event was instead held in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein building - home of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Society of the Friends of Music) and today the setting for the annual New Year's Day Concerts of the Vienna Philharmonic. As hosts of the Court Opera Ball, the artistes of the Hof-Operntheater were keen to present themselves as favourably as possible to their public, and so offered their guests a particularly beguiling programme. They engaged the Strauss Orchestra and its conductor, 'Court Ball Music Director' Eduard Strauss, to provide the music for dancing, but withheld their pièce de résistance until around midnight, when a break in proceedings of one hour¡¦s duration was announced for the benefit of both orchestra and dancers.

    Now the highlight of the evening was revealed as the resident orchestra of the Vienna Court Opera, the Vienna Philharmonic, presented a short concert of music. Since the Director of the Wiener Philharmoniker, Johann Herbeck, had been taken ill shortly before the ball, the first item - Carl Maria von Weber's Aufforderung zum Tanz (Invitation to the Dance), in Hector Berlioz's orchestration - was conducted by Otto Dessoff, who at that time was also leader of the Philharmonic Concerts. The critic of the Fremden-Blatt (24.04.1873) observed of this performance that it was played with such verve and precision that perhaps nobody will be able to recall having heard this piece of music better [played]. The journalist continued: After this, Johann Strauss stepped up to the conductor's podium to perform his latest waltz, 'Wiener Blut'. We do not believe that we are overstating our praise if we count this work amongst the best by the beloved Waltz King. This dance piece is a collection of genuine Viennese tunes, full of melody and electrifying rhythm. On tempestuous demand the waltz had to be repeated. The reviewer for the Neues Wiener Tagblatt (23.04.1873) was equally enthusiastic, numbering the waltz Wiener Blut amongst the most beautiful which Strauss has written in recent years. In these three-four bars, sometimes cheeky, sometimes sentimental, flows fresh, free and red Viennese blood.

    This performance of the waltz Wiener Blut, on the night of 22/23 April 1873, marked the first occasion on which the Viennese Waltz King conducted the renowned Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and thus also the commencement of the orchestra's 'Strauss tradition'. (Some six months later, on 4 November 1873, the Wiener Philharmoniker would cement this relationship still further when, under the composer's direction, they performed Strauss's waltz An der schönen blauen Donau for the very first time at a concert in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein, hosted by the Committee of the Chinese World Exhibition.)

  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen Waltz, Op. 410 Voices of Spring

    8:37

    Zygmunt Nitkiewicz - conductor
    Symphony Orchestra of The Józef Marcin Żebrowski Music School in Częstochowa, Poland
    La Folle Journée de Varsovie
    recorded at Polish National Opera House in Warsaw, september 27, 2016

  • Johann Strauss II - Persian March, Op. 289 conducted by Maciej Tomasiewicz

    2:51

    Special Winners Concert of 3rd Polish Nationwide Music Schools' Symphonic Orchestras Competition
    Audition Award - Polish Youth Symphony Orchestra in Bytom, Maciej Tomasiewicz - conductor
    Zdobywca nagrody publiczności - Polska Młodzieżowa Orkiestra Symfoniczna –
    Orkiestra Ogólnokształcącej Szkoły Muzycznej I i II stopnia im. Fryderyka Chopina w Bytomiu,
    pod dyrekcją Macieja Tomasiewicza

  • Johann Strauss II - The Gypsy Baron - Einzugsmarsch

    2:56

    Johann Strauss II - The Gypsy Baron - Einzugsmarsch

  • J. Strauss Jr. - The Blue Danube Waltz - Leonard Bernstein - 1969

    10:22

    Leonard Bernstein - New York Philharmonic - 1969

  • Johann Strauss II - Éljen a Magyar! - Polka-schnell, Op. 332

    2:29

    Immediately after the close of the official 1869 Vienna Carnival calendar, Johann and Josef Strauss began preparations for their joint Russian summer season of concerts in Pavlovsk from 9 May (= 27 April, Russian calendar) until 10 October (= 28 September). But a number of concert engagements had to be fulfilled before their departure, including a journey by the Strauss orchestra under the direction of all three brothers, Johann, Josef and Eduard, to the Hungarian town of Pest on the banks of the Danube. To coincide with the opening of Pest's imposing new Redoutensaal building, the brothers had organised two concerts there on 16 and 17 March. It was at the first of these that Johann conducted his quick polka Éljen a Magyar!, composed especially for the occasion and dedicated to the Hungarian Nation. From his early days as a composer Johann was as much at home with the music of Hungary as he was with that of his native Vienna, and this exciting work, further enhanced at its première by the participation of the Budapest Men's Choral Association, was triumphantly applauded and had to be repeated several times. The Coda of the work features a fleeting quotation from the Rákóczi March, which Berlioz had earlier utilised in his Damnation of Faust (1846), but which owes its origins to the patriotic Magyar Rákóczi song.

  • Johann Strauss II - Thunder and Lightning Polka

    3:10

    Esteemed Sirs! I have the honour of placing before the honoured Committee the title of 'Sternschnuppe' for a composition, specifically a 'schnellpolka', intended for the Hesperus Ball. Yours respectfully, Johann Strauss.

    Thus runs the text of an undated letter to the Vienna Artists' Association, 'Hesperus', written on behalf of the composer by his wife, Jetty, but signed by Strauss himself. Research suggests that this correspondence dates from 18 January 1868. On 6 February that year the Neues Wiener Tagblatt announced: For the Hesperus Ball, which takes place on Sunday 16th of this month in the Dianasaal, Messrs Johann, Josef and Eduard Strauss have promised 3 novelties with the titles: 'Sternschnuppe', 'Extempore' and 'Freie Gedanken'. This is the very last mention of Johann's Schnell-Polka Sternschnuppe (Shooting Star), and it raises some interesting questions.

    The Hesperus Ball took place, as announced, on 16 February 1868 in the Dianabad-Saal; with the brothers Johann, Josef and Eduard taking it in turns to conduct the Strauss Orchestra. Although the Viennese press reported on the festivity, none detailed the music played. Ten days later, on 26 February, the Viennese press carried advertisements for the traditional Carnival Revue of all the compositions written for that year's Vienna Carnival by the Strauss brothers, organised for 1 March in the Blumensäle (Floral Halls) of the k.k. Gartenbaugesellschaft (Imperial-Royal Horticultural Association). Adopting the long-established procedure, the announcement chronicles the balls at which the various works were first presented, but in the 1868 list no details appear beside Johann's carnival compositions. As might be expected, alongside the entries for Josef's Extempore, Polka française (op. 241) and Eduard's waltz Freie Gedanken (op. 39) appears Hesperus Ball. Moreover, under Johann's list of contributions one searches in vain for any mention of Sternschnuppe. Of the total 20 new dances featured on the programme of the 1868 Revue, given as a benefit concert for Josef and Eduard Strauss and with the participation of Johann, 10 were contributed by Josef, 7 by Eduard and only 3 by Johann. Specifically the Waltz King's tally comprises the waltz Die Publicisten (op. 321, actually written for the Concordia Ball on 4 February), the polka-mazurka Ein Herz, ein Sinn (op. 323, for the Citizens' Ball on 11 February) and a quick polka entitled - Unter Donner und Blitz. (In some newspapers the work is identified as Unter Blitz und Donner.) As to the identity of this last-mentioned work, not until the appearance of press announcements for a 'Ladies' Night', hosted by the Hesperus in the Blumensäle on Saturday 7 March 1868, and attended by some 1,100 guests, does a solution to the mystery present itself. In brackets, alongside the eighth item on the concert programme - Unter Donner und Blitz, Polka schnell - appears the supplementary information: Hesperus, clearly indicating that the piece had been performed at an earlier festivity of the Association. Since in early 1868 there were no balls or concerts to which this reference could apply other than the ball on 16 February, one must conclude that this dance composition was played for the first time at the Hesperus Ball in the Dianabad-Saal. Yet this conclusion provides only a partial solution, for known contemporary press sources cannot confirm whether the polka was heard at its première as Unter Donner und Blitz, Sternschnuppe or even Unter Blitz und Donner (as Josef and Eduard refer to the piece in their handwritten programme for the Hesperus 'Ladies' Night'). For his part, however, Josef Strauss noted in his diary among the new works being first performed at the Hesperus Ball: Unter Donner und Blitz.

  • Johann Strauss Jr.s Overtures - Die Göttin der Vernunft

    6:45

    Johann Strauss II - The Goddess of Reason (1897).

    On 11 July 1896 the Illustrirtes Wiener Extrablatt and Fremden-Blatt newspapers jointly informed their readers that Johann Strauss who is at present on his summer break at [Bad] Ischl, as every year, has there commenced the composition of a new three- act operetta. The libretto for this is being written by A.M. Willner and Bernhard Buchbinder. Maestro Strauss, who has set about working on the new piece with great creative joy, expects to have it completed for autumn 1897. Later, it became known that the new stage work was to be called Die Göttin der Vernunft (The Goddess of Reason).

    The contract with Alexandrine von Schönerer (1850-1919), directrix of the Theater an der Wien, was signed by Strauss and his librettists on 14 January 1897, the opening night of Die Göttin der Vernunft being scheduled for 10 March. In the early days of March it was announced that the première had been postponed until the 16th of the month. It was then reinstated for the 10th and eventually took place at the Theater an der Wien on Saturday 13 March 1897. Apparently suffering from harmless bronchial catarrah, Strauss himself stayed away from the première, being kept informed of the operetta's reception by telephone. The theatre orchestra at the première was conducted by Adolf Müller junior (1839-1901) and there was praise not only for the cast, but also for the orchestra's Czech-born leader, František Drdla (1869-1944), later famed internationally as the composer of numerous salon pieces.

    The opinions of the press towards Strauss's twilight stage work differed markedly. While the Deutsche Zeitung (14.03.1897) opined: Inventiveness and power of execution have both deserted the aged composer; what is left only succeeds in a few places in rising above banality, the Fremden-Blatt (14.03.1897) concluded: Without a doubt, the 'Goddess of Reason' will reign for a considerable time at the Theater an der Wien. This critic's prophesy was misjudged, and Die Göttin der Vernunft disappeared after a total of 36 performances. By that time, antagonistic Viennese journalists had long been writing and speaking only of Die Göttin der Unvernunft (The Goddess of Absurdity).

    After that first performance at the Theater an der Wien on 6 April 1897, the overture to Die Göttin der Vernunft was only rarely heard outside the theatre. By the time Johann eventually furnished the overture, the Concert season for Vienna's civilian and military bands had drawn to a close. For his part, Eduard Strauss conducted his last concert of the 1896/97 season with the Strauss Orchestra in the Golden Hall of the Vienna Musikverein on Sunday 28 March 1897. He then gave two concerts in Graz before travelling with the orchestra to London to fulfil a three-month engagement at the Imperial Institute in Kensington. Eduard had clearly hoped to perform the overture to Die Göttin der Vernunft during his London season, for on 9 May 1897 he informed his brother: At your instigation Berté promised the overture in writing, but hasn't sent it!!! Dreadful!. In the event, no performance of the overture can be traced in London during Eduard's visit. Indeed, not until 21 November 1897, at Eduard's fifth Sunday concert of the 1897/98 season in the Musikverein, did the overture to Die Göttin der Vernunft appear on the programme of a concert by the Strauss Orchestra.

  • Strauss II - Emperor Waltz

    10:33

    Kaiser-Walzer, Op. 437 (Emperor Waltz) is a waltz composed by Johann Strauss II in 1889. The waltz was originally titled Hand in Hand and was intended as a toast made in August of that year by Emperor of Austria Franz Joseph I on the occasion of his visit to the German Emperor Wilhelm II where it was symbolic as a 'toast of friendship' extended by Austria-Hungary to the German Empire.

    Strauss' publisher, Fritz Simrock, suggested the title Kaiser-Walzer since the title could allude to either monarch, and thus satisfy the vanity of both rulers. The waltz was first performed in Berlin on 21 October 1889. The original cover of the piano edition bore the illustration of the Austrian Imperial Crown.

    Johann Strauss

    Emperor Waltz
    Valsa do Imperador

    For more:

  • Vienna Blood Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr.

    7:11

    Vienna Blood Waltz

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Vozes da Primavera-valsa de Johann Strauss Jr. - wmv

    7:36

    Lindas imagens da primavera em flor- web- montagem de vídeo Stela Soares

  • Johann Strauss II - Express - Polka-schnell, op. 311

    2:37

    Alongside the waltz Feen-Märchen and the Wildfeuer, Polka française, the mercurial Express-Polka schnell belongs to a group of three compositions by the Waltz King which all received their first performances on the same day. The event that launched the three works was advertised as a Novelty Concert for the benefit of Josef and Eduard Strauss, with the participation of Johann Strauss (Director of Music for the Imperial-Royal Court Balls), and took place in the Vienna Volksgarten on 18 November 1866. Nor were the novelties presented that afternoon restricted to Johann Strauss alone, for the event saw the premières of dances by his two brothers: Josef's Friedenspalmen Walzer (op. 207) and Etiquette-Polka française (op. 208) and Eduard's Colibri-Polka française (op. 21 ). The outpouring of such a flood of artistic inspiration was a precursor to the creativity with which the Strauss brothers, especially Johann and Josef, would strew the Vienna Carnival celebrations of 1867, and further demonstrates the remarkable way in which this family of musicians determined to banish the gloom and despair which prevailed following the Danube monarchy's defeat by the kingdom of Prussia during summer 1866.

    The piano edition of Johann's Express-Polka was issued on 18 November, the actual day of the work's première, while Josef's two contributions had already been published at the end of October. On 21 November 1866 a paragraph in the Fremdenblatt newspaper read: Several novelties have appeared in C.A. Spina's publishing house, namely: 'Express'-Polka by Johann

    Strauss, 'Etiquette' Polka and 'Friedenspalmen' by Josef Strauss. At their first performance last Sunday in the Volksgarten, the new dance pieces met with uproarious applause on the part of a numerous public. Indeed, such was the success of this benefit concert that the Strauss brothers repeated all six new compositions at their Volksgarten concert on the following Sunday, 25 November. Moreover, Johann's Express and Wildfeuer polkas joined Josef's Friedenspalmen Walzer and Eduard's Colibri-Polka on the programme of dances played at the Citizens' Ball in Schwender's 'Colosseum' on 22 January of the following year.

  • Johann Strauss, Jr. Pizzicato Polka - Violin Sheet Music Video Score

    1:05


    Johann Strauss, Jr. Pizzicato Polka (Excerpt) - Violin Sheet Music Video Score. Subscribe to our channel to watch weekly Video Scores from our high quality sheet music collection. This Video Score is about Violin Sheet Music and related MP3 files. It gives you the opportunity to play the music directly from your computer screen and to discover our unique repertoire of high quality digital sheet music.

  • Il Valzer di Johann Strauss jr. ed il Pollino

    5:01

    Il sito ,
    dopo il video O Puglia bella (da vedere ed ascoltare !),
    presenta questo video dedicato al Parco Nazionale del Pollino, meta di gite ed escursioni di tanti Putignanesi, Castellanesi e Pugliesi in generale.
    La musica che accompagna il video (Valzer - Storielle del bosco viennese, op. 325) è di Johann Strauss jr. (1825-1899), proviene dal sito , ed è eseguita in pubblico dominio dalla US Air Force Band.
    La foto in pubblico dominio di Johann Strauss jr. proviene da Wikipedia.
    Le foto ed i filmati sono di

  • Johann Strauss Jr - Wine, Women and Song

    6:26

    Johann Strauss Jr

    Wine Women and Song

  • Johann Strauss II - Groß-Wien - Walzer, op. 440

    8:04

    This is a memorable day for the City of Vienna, being the birthday of 'Gross Wien' -- that is, of the new capital as enlarged by the incorporation of the suburbs. Yesterday Vienna was contained within 55 square kilometres; to-day it extends over 178 square kilometres, which makes it half the size of London, more than twice as large as Paris, and nearly three times as large as Berlin. The palace and park of Schönbrunn now stand within the city... Those favourite resorts of fair-weather excursionists, the villages of Hietzing, Dornbach, Hetzendorf, Döbling, and Baumgarten, have ceased to be rural, and even the Kahlenberg and its brother mountain, the Leopoldsberg, have become enclosed in the metropolitan area. Thus wrote the Vienna correspondent for the London Times newspaper on 21 December 1891, chronicling the incorporation of the 44 suburbs which previously lay outside the old outer defences of the city (the 'Linien') to form the present day districts XI to XIX, and the resultant growth in population by some 400,000 to around 1,342,000 civilians and 22,600 active military personnel. Demolition of these mid-18th-century fortifications -- constructed as a defence against further attack by the Turks, who had kept the city beleaguered for three months in 1683 -- had commenced in 1890, and had long been objects of execration because of the tolls levied on all who passed through them. At the stroke of midnight such duties were abolished amid great rejoicing. The police made one arrest -- a man who shouted: Hurrah! Now everything in Vienna is going to be dearer!

    Johann Strauss's waltz Gross-Wien, which came into being in early 1891, chronicles the work then underway to extend the boundaries of the Austrian capital, and was composed as a choral waltz for performance by the famous Wiener Männergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) during that year's Vienna Carnival, with a text by Franz von Gernerth. When the Association suddenly resolved to give only one 'Liedertafel' (Programme of Songs) per year, the performance was postponed until the autumn. There then arose the possibility of a performance by a rival choral society to be arranged by the Vienna Authors' and Journalists' Association, 'Concordia', but on 18 April 1891 Strauss notified a correspondent: I felt the time was already too far advanced and I promised the first performance of the waltz to the military committee for the Grand Concert on May 10 in the Sängerhalle, but only for orchestra... Should you ever intend to organise something with the participation of the Männer-Gesangverein... then the promise originally given will remain in force, that is, the first performance of the waltz Gross-Wien, with the contribution of the Männer-Gesangverein. (In the event, the choral première did not take place until 4 October 1891, when the Wiener Männergesang-Verein, conducted by its chorus-master Eduard Kremser, performed it at their concert in the Sängerhalle, accompanied by the Freiherr Ferdinand von Bauer Infantry Regiment No. 84).

    On 30 April 1891 the 65-year-old composer advised his Berlin publisher, Fritz Simrock: I shall personally conduct the first performance at the Monster Concert. Over five hundred musicians is no small exertion. Strauss did not exaggerate, for at the orchestral première of the new work, heard on Sunday 10 May 1891 as the second item in the second half of the concert given by the entire regimental bands of the Vienna garrison in the immense wooden Sängerhalle (Singers' Hall) in the Vienna Prater, 500 musicians (including 250 violinists) from the combined military orchestras of Vienna played under his baton. Much was made in the press of the fact that this was the first occasion on which an Austrian military orchestra had been directed by a civilian conductor. Included in the audience of 20,000 were members of the Austrian royal family, the King and Queen of Denmark and the Duke and Duchess of Cumberland. The composition met with great success, and prompted the critic of the Fremdenblatt to observe: The waltz is beautifully and artistically formed; the original, simple, straightforward and fresh nature of the popular Strauss waltzes is less apparent here. Johann Strauss has become more refined. He is standing at the portal of the Court Opera -- a reference to the forthcoming premiere of Johann's grand opera Ritter Pásmáan at the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera) on New Year's Day 1892.

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