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Playlist of Stan Hugill

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  • Stan Hugill - South Australia

    2:14

    Filmed in Workum in 1990, Stan is joined by Ron Barnett, Johnny Collins, Nanna Kalma, Jim Mageean, Danny MacLeod, Ryszard Muzaj, Shanty Jack, Janusz Sikorski, Marek Siurawski, Mike Wilson and Steve Wilson.

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  • Stan Hugill - Lowlands

    4:10

    Stan Hugill

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  • Stan Hugill and Stormalong John ‎- Chants Des Marins Anglais - 1992 - Full Album

    1:9:16

    Le Chasse-Marée ‎– SCM 021
    France 1992

    Recorded live 1988, 1989 and 1991

    Thanks to Kevin (see comments!) for working hard on the timestamps to the list below:

    1. 0:00 -- Blow The Man Down
    2. 2:35 -- The Balaena
    3. 6:19 -- South Australia
    4. 8:57 -- Santiana
    5. 13:10 -- Lowlands
    6. 16:11 -- John Kanaka
    7. 18:44 -- Serafina
    8. 20:55 -- Admiral Benbow
    9. 23:10 -- Rolling Down To Old Maui
    10. 28:39 -- Let The Bulgine Run
    11. 31:02 -- Good Bye Fare Ye Well
    12. 33:13 -- The Girls Of Dublin Town
    13. 36:50 -- Sam's Gone Away
    14. 39:34 -- The Drunken Sailor
    15. 42:24 -- Strike The Bell
    16. 45:40 -- Roll The Old Chariot
    17. 48:29 -- Hieland Laddie
    18. 51:25 -- Bulley In The Alley
    19. 53:54 -- The Black Ball Line
    20. 55:50 -- Randy Dandy O
    21. 59:05 -- Paddy Lay Back
    22. 1:04:38 -- Rio Grande

    Chorus – Arthur Garnett, Charlie Scott, Dave McLung, Frank McCall, Harry Lowney, Jack Coutts, John Wright, Keith Price, Shay Black, Tony Molyneux

  • Stan Hugill / South Australia

    3:08

    Stan Hugill (1906-1992)

    South Australia (rec. 1979)

    Stan Hugill was one of the most important 20th-century authorities on music of the sea. He spent the years from 1922 to 1945 as a sailor and chanteyman. He was the last chanteyman on the last British commercial sailing ship, Garthpool. Hugill was born in Cheshire, England, and spent his later years in Wales. In addition to being the author of key books on sea chanteys, he was an artist and a radio and television broadcaster...'South Australia' is a capstan chantey, believed to have originated on the ships taking immigrants from England to the colonies in Australia. - Jeff Place

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  • Stan Hugill - Reminisces - 1980 - Full Album

    57:32

    Greenwich Village Recording GVR 217
    UK 1980

    Introduction
    Larry Marr (The Five-Gallon Jar) (Roud 9412)
    Roll, Bullies, Roll (Liverpool Judies) (Roud 928)
    Bounty Was a Packet Ship (Roud 8235)
    Strike the Bell (Roud 4190)
    Fire Down Below (Roud 813)
    A Long Time Ago (Roud 319)
    Hilo Come Down Below (Roud 8291)
    John Cherokee (Roud 4693)
    Shiny-O
    John Kanaka (Roud 8238)
    Sacramento (Hoodah, Day) (Roud 319)
    Rolling Down to Old Maui (Roud 2005)

    Produced by John Stead;
    Recorded by John Hassell at The Herga Folk Club, The Royal Oak, Wealdstone, Middlesex, on 9 April 1979;
    Mastered by Tony Bridge at Pye Studios London;
    Cover photograph by Hugo Brittain at Aberdovey;
    Sleeve design by Mike Walsh

  • Stan Hugill - Leave her Johnny

    2:53

    Filmed in Workum in 1990, Stan is joined by Ron Barnett, Johnny Collins, Nanna Kalma, Jim Mageean, Danny MacLeod, Ryszard Muzaj, Shanty Jack, Janusz Sikorski, Marek Siurawski, Mike Wilson and Steve Wilson to sing the closing shanty of the evening.

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  • Stan Hugill - Haul on the bowline etc

    4:37

    Stan Hugill - Haul on the bowline etc

  • Stan Hugill at the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990 part 1 of 4

    6:55

    Exerpts from the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990.
    Stan Hugill the Last Working Shantyman.

  • Blow The Man Down

    2:54

    From the album Pusser's Rum Sailing Songs featuring Stan Hugill, the last working shantyman.

    Visit us online at

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  • Strike the Bell

    3:22

    Strike the Bell by Jeff Hugill from the album Pusser's Rum Sailing Songs. Tropical and nautical music

  • Stan Hugill at the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990 part 2 of 4

    4:26

    Exerpts from the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990.
    Stan Hugill the Last Working Shantyman.

  • hommage à stan hugill

    1:50

    chant de marin

  • Is the Boy

    2:21

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    I's the Boy · Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X-Seamen's Institute

    Sea Songs: Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X Seamen's Institute sing of Cape Horn sailing at the Seattle Chantey Festival

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1979 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1979-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Blow the Man Down

    2:50

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Blow the Man Down · Stan Hugill

    Sea Music of Many Lands: The Pacific Heritage

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1979 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1979-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Stan Hugill at the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990 part 4 of 4

    9:59

    Exerpts from the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990.
    Stan Hugill the Last Working Shantyman.

  • Stan Hugill at the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990 part 3 of 4

    8:13

    Exerpts from the International Shanty Festival Workum 1990.
    Stan Hugill the Last Working Shantyman.

  • Lowlands

    3:36

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Lowlands · Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X-Seamen's Institute

    Sea Songs: Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X Seamen's Institute sing of Cape Horn sailing at the Seattle Chantey Festival

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1979 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1979-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Stan Hugill - Heave Away Boys Heave Away

    1:37

    A halyard shanty from the West Indies, sung by Stan Hugill with Stormalong John. From the CD A Salty Fore Topman.
    I do not own the copyright to this recording of a traditional song.

  • Rolling Down to Old Maui - Whaling song, in Stan Hugill style

    7:31

    It occurred to me that after 6+ years of posting videos of maritime-related songs, I hadn’t done the popular variety of “Old Maui”. Two years ago, to the day, I did do a rendition of the 1850s vintage “Atkins Adams” style version which few if anybody every performs. I guess I figured the popular version, here, was too commonplace. And besides, my channel also has footage of the main torch-bearer of this song, Don Sineti, singing it in its most “holy” context: the closing concert of the annual Sea Music Festival in Mystic.


    More still, one of my earliest videos had a bit of this version being sung by a home-grown product of the Mystic scene, Rev Carr (with me singing on the chorus).

    So I figured these gestures were enough to have “covered” the song.

    But, while in Mystic this summer I had a chance to hear audio of some of Stan Hugill’s talks/performances at the Seaport at their earliest sea music festivals/symposia, 1980-2. If you don’t know already, the reason the world knows “Old Maui” is through Stan Hugill. In fact, he pointed this out in one of those early 80s appearances; he had already begun to popularize the song in the late 70s, and by the time of the 1980 festival “everybody” knew it. But he also gave credit to the person he claims to have learned it from, an Irishman named Paddy Griffiths (presumably in the 1920s). I quote:

    “And one of the reasons you’ve got my version—and nobody else’s—of “Rolling Down from Maui”; my tune and my words are from him. Paddy Griffiths was in Valparaiso one time, in the latter days of the whaling ships… […] So that was Paddy. He had a remendous background, Paddy Griffiths, and he gave me an awful lot of songs and chanties and forebitters and things like this.”

    Anyway, I was listening to the old Hugill tapes and was thinking about how Hugill’s somewhat slow, measured, and dramatic style of singing this song had gone by the wayside. Particularly fascinating was his performance of the song in 1981, which has a sort of “swing” to it; the first couple verses are syncopated with almost an underlying “clave” feel to them. I could imagine perhaps back in the 1920s various habanero/fandango things going on in popular music that, just maybe, had an influence on Paddy Griffiths. True, the song (or poem) dates from the 1850s, but the Hugill (/Griffiths?) version, with its language like “paint them beaches red,” speaks from the 20th century.

    Also, Hugill sang with a slightly different melody than what has become popular since, and he consistently sang the “natural seventh” scale degree rather than the “sharp seventh.” The result is a more (so-called) “modal” sounding tune, as opposed to the “classical” sounding “Jolly Miller” tune that sounds rather 18th century.

    So here’s a rendition inspired by listening to those old Hugill tapes and with some homage (at times humorous) to his singing style.

    Most of the additional background info on this song in general can be read in the description of the Atkins Adams version video:


    And because I was in residence at Mystic Seaport during this summer (2014), a place in which the ghost of Hugill is seen everywhere, I put this to scenes of a “typical” summer day there. During my stay, I regularly had the chance to shadow the Seaport’s brilliant Demonstration Squad, who perform all of the shipboard and boating demos in a day-long series, each day with a rotating set of staff. The staff were gracious and welcoming as always to me, and I tried to do my best to return the favor by staying out of their way. (Although the reason you don’t see many chanty-related activities in this montage is because during them I was participating singing/working rather than filming.)

  • The Argo

    1:52

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    The Argo · Stan Hugill, X-Seamen's Insitute and David Jones

    Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1980 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1980-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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  • Stan Hugill & David Jones - The Island Lass

    1:50

    Stan Hugill & David Jones - The Island Lass.
    Channel Links Below!

    Instrumental Channel:

    This Channel:

  • A Long Time Ago

    1:58

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    A Long Time Ago · Louis Killen · Stan Hugill · The X-Seamen's Institute

    Sea Songs Seattle: Sung by Lou Killen, Stan Hugill, The X-Seamens Institute and Friends

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1979 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1979-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Hanging Johnny

    3:08

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Hanging Johnny · Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X-Seamen's Institute

    Sea Songs: Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X Seamen's Institute sing of Cape Horn sailing at the Seattle Chantey Festival

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1979 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1979-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Santiano

    4:10

    Santiano by Jeff Hugill from the album Pusser's Rum Sailing Rum

  • Shanties Stan Hugill - Haul on the bowline

    1:23

  • Martin and Phil Hugill - The Coast of Peru

    4:15

    While sons of the famous Liverpool ambassador for sea shanties, Stan Hugill, this duo presents the music of their generation. They generally follow the English folk music Revival versions, such as this whaling ballad, Coast of Peru, which is probably based in the version popularized by A.L. Lloyd. (Versions of this song collected by Harlow, Colcord, and Huntington have a different melody.) Their lack of pretense or trying to play up what they were doing and interested in was refreshing, I thought.

    Phil and Martin appear here at the Mystic Seaport's 30th Sea Music Festival, 14 June 2009.

  • Drink a Tot to Me!

    2:14

    From the album Pusser's Rum Sailing Songs featuring Stan Hugill, the last working shantyman.

  • Song For Stan Hugill

    2:22

    Provided to YouTube by CDBaby

    Song For Stan Hugill · Fred Gosbee

    The Ballad of Cappy John & Other Songs of Coastal Maine

    ℗ 1999 Fred Gosbee

    Released on: 1999-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Susannavisan - Best Sea Shanties

    1:53

    EN
    In the case of this song, Stan Hugill again mentioned the source Sang under Segel, Sigurd's Sternwall's Swedish shanty book (Reference to its being sung at the capstan is to be found in the Preface, page 12). From this book, Stan Hugill gives us two verses and melody to this beautiful song, the construction of the verses is really close to Stephen Foster's version of Oh Susanna.
    Additionally, worth noting this version is a personal translation of Stan Hugill, so I think it deserves to singing it.
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 117).


    PL
    W przypadku tej piosenki Stan Hugill ponownie wspomniał o źródle „Sang under Segel”, szwedzkiej książce o szantach Sigurda Sternwalla (wzmiankę o śpiewaniu jej przy kabestanie można znaleźć w przedmowie, str. 12). Z tej książki Stan Hugill daje nam dwie zwrotki i melodię do tej pięknej piosenki, konstrukcja zwrotek jest bardzo zbliżona do wersji „Oh Susanna” Stephena Fostera.
    Dodatkowo wspomnę, że ta wersja jest osobistym tłumaczeniem Stana Hugilla, więc myślę, że zasługuje na to, by ją zaśpiewać.

    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 117).


    Susannavisan (Stan Hugill Translation)

    Oh, I was born on Sweden's Coast,
    Where the fine ships sail along,
    And a fine ship was my heart's desire,
    Since I was very young.

    But the first time that he went aboard,
    He kissed me tenderly,
    And unto me he said these words,
    'You are all the word to me.'

    - Oh, Susanna, now don't ye cry for me,
    - Be faithful to your sailor boy
    - Till I come home from sea.

    *2*
    On a long voyage he went away,
    I sat alone and sighed.
    And when the wind was howling wild,
    'Tis oft at night I cried.

    But when the tears ran down my cheecks,
    My sailor boy came home.
    He sang to me in deep content,
    From these arms I'll never roam.

    - Oh, Susanna, oh, don't ye cry for me,
    - I'm homeward bound to you at last,
    - And now I'm safe with thee.

  • The Island Lass

    1:50

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    The Island Lass · Stan Hugill, X-Seamen's Insitute and David Jones

    Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1980 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1980-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Bosuns Alphabet

    4:33

    Provided to YouTube by Ditto Music

    Bosun's Alphabet · Stormalong John · Stan Hugill

    Sailing Days

    ℗ Stan Hugill and Stormalong John

    Released on: 2001-01-02

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • The Powder Monkey 148

    22

    *From the unabridged edition of Stan Hugill's SHANTIES FROM THE SEVEN SEAS (1961).

    [Little] Powder Monkey Jim was a music hall song of the nineteenth century. (I find a reference from the 1880s; it may date to earlier than that.) Apparently it gained some popularity among sailors, however I have not seen evidence it was a chantey. In any case, Hugill does not offer it as such. Rather, he gives this example (of dubious relevance, IMO) to opine that this shore sea-song was based on the chantey Hieland Laddie. The excerpt here is only the chorus of the old music hall ditty.

    See the whole Shanties from the Seven Seas project, here:

  • STAN HUGILL

    3:01

    Stan Hugill en het Blokzijl's Piratenkoor met Blow the man down.
    Bar van het Eemshotel in Delfzijl.
    Opname: Rena van den Berg

  • Het maatje van de schipper -Astrid Nijgh

    2:49

    Afkomstig van haar LP De Razende Bol

  • Shanandoah

    3:37

    Provided to YouTube by Ditto Music

    Shanandoah · Stormalong John · Stan Hugill

    Sailing Days

    ℗ Stan Hugill and Stormalong John

    Released on: 2001-01-02

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Stan Hugill & David Jones - Paddy Lay Back

    4:24

    Stan Hugill & David Jones - Paddy Lay Back.
    Channel Links Below!

    Instrumental Channel:

    This Channel:

  • Stan Hugill & David Jones - The Topman

    1:47

    Stan Hugill & David Jones - The Topman.
    Channel Links Below!

    Instrumental Channel:

    This Channel:

  • A Song for Stan Hugill

    2:12

    Provided to YouTube by CDBaby

    A Song for Stan Hugill · Castlebay

    The Long Isle

    ℗ 1989 Julia Lane & Fred Gosbee

    Released on: 1989-09-09

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Sacramento

    3:47

    Provided to YouTube by Ditto Music

    Sacramento · Stormalong John · Stan Hugill

    Sailing Days

    ℗ Stan Hugill and Stormalong John

    Released on: 2001-01-02

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Roll The Cotton Down - Halyard Shanty

    3:25

    EN
    A very popular halyard shanty Roll the cotton down, opens a big family of the shanties, which Stan Hugill describes as the shanty with the word 'Roll'. As a matter of fact, it vies with 'blow' and 'hilo' as the most popular word in a sailor work-song. At Tops'l halyard it was a hardy perennial, although it suited t'gallant halyards it was a hardy perennial, although it suited t'gallant halyards even more so, being of a fairly lively march time.
    This version is a Negro theme version.
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 152 ).


    PL
    Bardzo popularna szanta rejowa „Roll the cotton down”, otwiera dużą rodzinę szant, którą Hugill określa jako szanty ze słowem „Roll”. W rzeczywistości konkuruje z „blow” i „hilo” jako najpopularniejsze słowo w marynarskich piesniach-pracy. Szanta ta świetnie pasowała do podnoszenia marsreji, również do fałów bramreji, chociaż najbardziej pasowała do fałów bombramrei, ponieważ miał dość żywe marszowe tempo.
    Ta wersja to Niewolnicza wersja.
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed p 152).



    Roll The Cotton Down ( A )


    Oooh, roll the cotton down, me boys,
    - ROLL the cotton DOWN!
    Oh, roll the cotton down, me boys,
    - Oh, ROLL the cotton DOWN!

    *2*
    I,m goin' down to Alabam,
    To roll the cotton down, me boys,

    *3*
    When I lived down south in Tennessee,
    My old Massa, oh, he said to me.

    *4*
    Oh, the slaver works for the white man boss,
    He's the one who rides on the big white hoss.

    *5*
    If the sun don' shine, then the hens don'lay,
    If the slaver won't work, then the boss won't pay.

    *6*
    Away down south where I was born,
    I worked in the cotton and the corn.

    *7*
    Oh the slaver works the whole day long,
    The Camptown ladies sing this song.

    *8*
    When I was young before the war,
    Times were gay on the Mississippi shore.

    *9*
    When work was over at the close of day,
    'Tis then you'd hear the banjo play.

    *10*
    While the darkies would sit around the door,
    And the piccanninies played upon the floor.

    *11*
    But since the war there's been a change,
    To the darkey everything seems strange.

    *12*
    No more you'll hear the banjo play,
    For the good ol' times have passed away.

    *13*
    And now we're off to New Orleans,
    To that land of Slaver Queens

    *14*
    Oh, in Alabama where I was born
    A-screwin cotton of a summer's morn.

  • Rolling Home to Old New Brunswick

    3:52

    Rolling Home to Old New Brunswick is my variation of the original version of what Stan Hugill called “…the most famous homeward-bound shanty of all, (Shanties from the Seven Seas – pgs. 145-150). Hugill notes it is believed the shanty was based on a poem by Charles Mackay, written on board a ship in 1858. He speculates Mackay heard the sailors at the capstan and based his poem on their original shanty. He said:

    I remember an unforgettable scene when the four-masted barque Gustav was making fast in Belfast after a 142-days passage from Geelong, Australia, round Cape Stiff. The anchor cable was unshackled from the anchor and hove ashore around a bollard and back aboard again. All hands manned the anchor capstan. I sang one verse of Rolling Home in English and all hands sang the chorus in English, then a German shantyman sang a German verse and all hands sang the chorus in Low German, and so on alternating English and German verses until the long job was done. And then from the crowd of onlookers on the dockside a rousing cheer rang out.

    The first three verses come from many variations of the song that were sung on different vessels. I wrote a fourth making it more relevant to New Brunswick. I have chosen to sing this in its ballad form (called a forebitter or a fo’c’sle shanty for relaxed, after-watch entertainment). It was often used as a capstan shanty to help the sailors keep time as they marched around the capstan. The capstan shanty divided each verse of the ballad into two four-line stanzas. The crew would sing the chorus after every stanza.

    Carl Peterson sings the ballad form of this song in Rolling Home to Dear Old Scotland



    The Old Blind Dogs do a capstan shanty-esque version in Rolling Home to Caledonia

  • Rolling Down The River

    3:01

    Provided to YouTube by Ditto Music

    Rolling Down The River · Stormalong John · Stan Hugill

    Sailing Days

    ℗ Stan Hugill and Stormalong John

    Released on: 2001-01-02

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Lowlands Away - Best Sea Shanties

    7:13

    EN
    This originally pumping shanty was later used as windlass and capstan. According to Stan Hugill, because was difficult to sing, was never popular. Terry claims that after the China clipper era it was seldom heard.
    Its Dead Lover theme definitely originated in Scotland or North England.
    This dead lover pattern one I sing, of four is:
    The dead lover is a male
    another three patterns are:
    The dead lover is a female,
    Sailor's dream of his sweetheart
    Later southern States version
    The version I will try to recreate I heard it on Stan Hugill's album - Aboard the Cutty Sark (1979).
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 65,66).

    PL
    Pierwotnie szanta pompowa później używana jako windzie kotwicznej(winda nie zawsze kabestanowa czasami falowa) i przy kabestanie. Według Stana Hugilla, ponieważ trudno było ja śpiewać, nigdy nie była zbyt popularna. Terry twierdzi, że po chińskiej epoce Kliprow rzadko ja słyszano.
    Jej motywy „martwego ukochanego” definitywnie pierwotnie pochodzi ze Szkocji lub północnej Anglii.
    Ten jeden z czterech wzorów ktory zaspiewam „martwego ukochanego” to:
    „Zmarły kochanek jest mężczyzną”
    kolejne trzy wzory to:
    „Zmarła kochanka jest kobietą”,
    „Sen marynarza o jego ukochanej”
    „Późniejsza wersja dla Stanów Południowych (Ameryki)”
    Wersja, którą spróbuję odtworzyć, znam z albumu Stana Hugilla - Aboard the Cutty Sark (1979).
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (1st ed: p 65,66).


    Lowlands Away (a) ( i)

    Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
    Lowlands Away I heard them say,
    [My] Lowlands away!

    *1*
    I dreamt a dream, the other night,
    Lowlands, Lowlands away my John!
    I dreamt a dream, the other night,
    [My] Lowlands away!

    *2*
    I dreamt I saw my own true love,
    He stood so still, he did not move,

    *3*
    I knew my love was drowned and dead,
    He stood so still, no word he said.

    *4*
    All dank his hair, all dim his eye,
    I knew that he had said goodbye.

    *5*
    All green and wet with weeds so cold,
    Around his form green weeds had hold.

    *6*
    I'm drowned in the Lowland Seas,' he said,
    'Oh, you an' I will ne'er be wed.'

    *7*
    I shall never kiss you more,' he said,
    'Never kiss you more --- for I am dead.'

    *8*
    I will cut my breasts until they bleed.'
    His form had gone --- in the green weed.

    *9*
    I will cut away my bonnie hair,
    No other man will think me fair.'

    *10*
    I bound the weeper round my head,
    For now I knew my love was dead.

    *11*
    My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,
    My love is drowned in the windy Lowlands,

  • Roll the Chariot Along

    3:15

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Roll the Chariot Along · Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X-Seamen's Institute

    Sea Songs: Louis Killen, Stan Hugill and the X Seamen's Institute sing of Cape Horn sailing at the Seattle Chantey Festival

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1979 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1979-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • So Early In The Morning - Best Sea Shanties

    2:46

    EN
    Miss C. F. Smith writes that it was a favorite in the old Black-wallers. Is opening solo bears a striking resemblance to the shanty Miss Lucy Long. Stan Hugill claims that is this version he took from Ezra Cobb, a bluenose (Nova Scotian) seamen of the old school, he says: this version was sung only at pumps, although he did say that Twere used sometimes at caps'n.'
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (p 57).

    PL
    Panna C. F. Smith pisze, że była to ulubiona piesn dawnych czarnoskórych. Otwarte solo jest uderzająco podobne do szanty „Miss Lucy Long. Stan Stan Hugill, podaje ze ta wersja pochodzi od Ezry Cobba, bluenose'a (marynarza z Nowej Szkocji), mowil ze ta wersja była śpiewana tylko przy pompach, chociaż rowniez powiedzial, że „Czasem używa się jej czasem przy kabestanie”
    Shanties from the Seven Seas by Stan Hugill (str 57).


    So Early In The Morning (B)

    *1*
    The bottle-O, the bottle-O, the sailor loves The bottle-O,
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!
    *2*
    A bottle o' rum, a bottle o' beer, a bottle o' Red-eye whisky-O
    So! early in the morning the sailor likes... his bottle O!

    *3*
    The baccy-O, terbaccy-O, the sailor loves his baccy-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

    *4*
    A packet o' shag, a packet o' cut, a plug o' hard terbaccy-O
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

    *5*
    The lassies-O, the maidens-O, the sailor loves the judies-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

    *6*
    A lass from the 'Pool, a gal from the Tyne, a chowlah so fine an' dandy-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

    *7*
    A bully rough-house, a bully rough-house, the sailor likes a rough-house-O
    So! early in the morning the sailor likes... his bottle O!

    *8*
    A Tread on me coat, and all-hands-in, a bully good rough an' tumble-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

    *9*
    A sing-song-O, a sing-song-O, the sailor likes a sing-song-O.
    So! early in the morning the sailor likes... his bottle O!

    *10*
    A drinkin' song, a song o' love, a ditty o' seas and shipmatessing-song-O,
    So! early in the morning the sailor loves... his bottle O!

  • Donegal Danny

    5:27

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Donegal Danny · Stan Hugill · The X-Seamen's Insitute · David Jones

    Sea Songs: Newport, Rhode Island- Songs from the Age of Sail

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings / 1980 Folkways Records

    Released on: 1980-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • The Fireship

    4:22

    Provided to YouTube by Ditto Music

    The Fireship · Stormalong John · Stan Hugill

    Sailing Days

    ℗ Stan Hugill and Stormalong John

    Released on: 2001-01-02

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Run Come See

    2:47

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Run Come See · The X Seamen’s Institute

    Classic Maritime Music from Smithsonian Folkways

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Released on: 2004-05-25

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Santiano

    1:49

    Provided to YouTube by Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Santiano · The X Seamen’s Institute, Lou Killen and Stan Hugill

    Classic Maritime Music from Smithsonian Folkways

    ℗ 2004 Smithsonian Folkways Recordings

    Released on: 2004-05-25

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Radcliffe Highway

    3:22

    Provided to YouTube by Ditto Music

    Radcliffe Highway · Stormalong John · Stan Hugill

    Sailing Days

    ℗ Stan Hugill and Stormalong John

    Released on: 2001-01-02

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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