This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

Playlist of Population of Europe Throughout History (1600

x
  • Migrations: Russian and Eastern European Jewish

    5:03

    The immigration of Jews from Russia and Eastern Europe between 1881 and the National Origins Act of 1924 brought timeless musical traditions and inspired new ones in America. Carnegie Hall’s exploration of this music includes ecstatic klezmer music with the Andy Statman Trio, Michael Feinstein performing popular songs rooted in the Eastern-European tradition, and a revue celebrating the journey of Yiddish culture from the Old to New World.



    The history of America is indelibly linked to the movement of people. Some were brought here not of their own free will, and their perseverance and resilience transformed the nation. Others came here—or moved within the borders of this country—because they sought a new life, free from poverty, discrimination, and persecution. The many contributions—cultural, social, and political—of these migrations, and the people who helped to build this country and what it means to be American, are honored in Carnegie Hall’s festival Migrations: The Making of America.

    Carnegie Hall examines the musical legacies of three migrations: the crossings from Scotland and Ireland during the 18th and 19th centuries, the immigration of Jews from Russia and Eastern Europe between 1881 and the National Origins Act of 1924, and the Great Migration—the exodus of African Americans from the South to the industrialized cities of the Northeast, Midwest, and West from 1917 into the 1970s.

    With performances of bluegrass, old-time, klezmer, Yiddish musical theater, blues, jazz, and more, Carnegie Hall celebrates the American musical traditions that flourished as a result of these migrations.

  • x
  • Russian Folk Music & Slavic Music

    1:3:49

    Russian folk music and Slavic music about Russian and Slavic landscapes, villages, and mythical tales.


    ????️ If you like this Russian folk music and Slavic music compilation, you might love this playlist:

    World music |


    ???? Join the fantasy music community by subscribing:




    ???? Buy our music here :

    iTunes :
    Bandcamp :
    Amazon mp3 :


    ???? Listen to this music on Spotify:

    Spotify :

    ***

    Tracklist :


    Russian Music:

    0:00 – Russian Winter
    3:09 – Night in Russia
    6:01 – The Bogatyr
    9:39 – Tale of the Firebird
    12:42 – Gray River Fort
    15:56 – Market of the Northlands
    19:11 – Old Stone Ruins

    Slavic Music:

    22:21 – Slavic Lands
    25:48 – Growling Bear Tavern
    28:50 – Slavic Warriors
    31:59 – Woodland Leshy
    35:06 – Forest Vila
    38:31 – Alkonost
    41:45 – Devana
    44:52 – Belobog
    48:05 – Czech Castle
    51:16 – Kingdom of Serbia
    54:32 – Polish Town
    57:32 – Poland
    1:00:40 – Ukrainian Village


    These beautiful pictures are from Ivan Aivazovsky (1st pic), Svet-Svet (2nd pic), Apollinary Vasnetsov (3rd pic), Viktor Vasnetsov (4th pic), Ivan Bilibin (5th pic), ge0rgekraldzungle (6th pic), Chentzu (7th pic), Jan Nepomucen Głowacki (8th pic), and Vitryak (last pic).

    1.

    2.

    3.

    4.

    5.

    6.

    7.

    8.

    9.

    Relevant hashtags:

    #russian #russianmusic #slavicmusic #russianfolk #slavic #folk #folkmusic #czechmusic #polishmusic #serbianmusic #balalaika


    ~ All music is composed by Derek and Brandon Fiechter ~

  • x
  • Europe countries whit the most population

    1:00

  • Finest 15 Largest European Cities in History

    12:28

    This video shows European history about the Finest 15 largest cities by population in European history from 1 AD to Till year 2019. This video shows Europe's largest city ancient history and demographics from 1 AD to year 2019.
    Population of these European cities is noted as per historical data .Minor mistakes and fluctuations are possible . I put my best effort to make this data as accurate as possible, also the cities flags ( Sorry Some Flags Are Not At Exact Location ) Moreover Information Provided is according to the today's current location of cities and for people to better understand as all of them are not historians and also because some of ancient flags are mislaid .

    Cities in Video: London ,Lisbon,Cordoba,Seville,Granada,Madrid ,Paris ,Amsterdam ,Rome
    Naples , Milan , Palermo , Venice , Prague , Athens , Istanbul , Sarai , Moscow , Berlin , Budapest , Warsaw , Edirne , Saint Petersburg, Vienna, Hamburg, Cologne, Antwerp, Warsaw, Budapest , Munich , Philippi .Barcelona And Many More.

    Data Source :

    And also some research from history sources where data seemed inoperative .

  • x
  • Spanish and Portuguese Expansion and the Conquest of the Americas

    1:46:07

    We trace how Portugal and Spain, two previously marginal European kingdoms, rapidly and unexpectedly exploded onto the world scene, building a chain of fortified colonies stretching from North Africa to China, and conquering the larger and richer empires of Mexico and Peru. The early Iberian colonizers sought to continue the tradition of the Crusades and the Reconquista, and saw their foreign conquests as steps towards retaking Jerusalem; the benefited not only from superior weaponry and navigation, but from cataclysmic disease epidemics that brought the Pre-Columbian empires to their knees.
    Please contribute what you can in the spirit of knowledge and inquiry! --
    Suggested further reading: Russell: Prince Henry 'The Navigator': A Life; Restall, Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest; Brading, The First America.

    - video upload powered by

  • Age of Absolutism 1: Central Europe and the Rise of the Habsburgs

    1:15:52

    We follow how a relatively obscure family of Swiss counts took advantage of the chaos of the late Middle Ages to become the most powerful dynasty in the history of central Europe, towering over European affairs, ruling an empire on which the sun never sets, and even setting their sights on the dream of global dominion. We then consider the obstacles that the French, the Ottoman Turks, and the Protestants threw in their way, leading to the disastrous Thirty Years' War and their gradual fall from power.

    Please become a patron and contribute what you can in the spirit of knowledge and inquiry!


    Suggested further reading: Paula Sutter Fichtner, Meaning Well: The Curious Life of a Habsburg Idealist.

  • x
  • World Population through the Ages in visual form

    2:00

    Subscribe for more videos from Waxploitation:

  • 03 W V The Black Death, how did plague reshape the world Hauger History lecture Video through Sh

    12:17

    The Black Death, how did plague reshape the world? What lessons did we learn? What did we not understand back in the 14th century?
    Slides - 60 -
    Video -
    Assignment - Shegg Assignment - understanding the Black Death 5 points and questions

  • Age of Ice and Fire: The General Crisis Of The Seventeenth Century

    1:23:31

    We trace the waves of crop failure, famine, pestilence, and war that swept over Europe in the 1600s as the climate sank into a “Little Ice Age” and armies literally marched across frozen seas. In the midst of unimaginable crisis, alchemists, astrologers, and apocalypticists scoured the Bible for prophecies to explain the disasters around them as part of the approaching End Times. Many of the defining institutions of the modern world we know today – such as overseas colonization, investor-owned corporations, public education, religious toleration, and scientific academies – have their origins as attempts to cope with the crisis of the seventeenth century and prepare the way for the Second Coming.

    Please become a patron and contribute what you can in the spirit of knowledge and inquiry, and in order to have access to patron-only lectures, including Myth of the Month: The Exodus --

    Suggested Further Reading: Webster, The Great Instauration; Yates, The Rosicrucian Enlightenment; Hobsbawm, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century

  • x
  • Anglo-Saxon England and the Vikings, 757-1066

    1:6:36

    How did a set of seven fractious kingdoms unite into a new kingdom, known as England, while under almost constant attack by Viking berserkers from across the North Sea?

    Please support this podcast and hear all lectures, including the recent examination of the historical King Arthur --

    Image: The Ormside bowl, an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon silver bowl found in the grave of a Viking warrior, photographed by JMiall

    Music: A 1914 Edison Records wax-cylinder recording of Rule, Britannia, provided by the University of California Santa Barbara Cylinder Preservation and Digitization Project

  • 65 Idols who are born in 2006 and after

    13:36

    Hi,
    This been a long time that I work on that video, so that's my gift to you for Christmas, Hope you like It~
    I just realsed that the comments are not accepted because of Copyright, sorry ???? If you want comments go on my channel and leave a comment ????
    I don't have put :
    ~ Formers members of LCG and mini LCG
    ~ Some members of Youngest
    ~ 2&Star Members

    Discord serv. :

  • A New Flag for Europe

    8:17

    A one film tryptic based on three of the participants in What Else Antwerp.

    In a documentary narrated by Thomas Mandl, each of these people talk about their perspective on Europe, their creative experience working and living in Europe, and their involvement with What Else Europe.

  • Steinway & Sons Documentary - A World of Excellence

    24:33

    Steinway & Sons episode from A World of Excellence series by Hantang Culture.

    A World of Excellence is the first documentary of its type in China to focus exclusively on the history, philosophy and heritage of the global luxury brands.

  • Colonial America: The Colonial Economy

    26:07

    Provides an overview of the developing economy of the 13 Colonies as a whole, and of the differing ways of life in the different sections of the colonies. It concludes with a discussion of how economic issues helped lead to the outbreak of the American Revolution.

    A student viewing guide and answer key are available at:

  • Dutch Immigration in the 1800s

    3:35

    School Project about the Dutch Immigration in the 1800's

  • Middle Ages 4: The Late Middle Ages

    1:20:35

    We discuss how the civilization of the High Middle Ages broke down under the onslaught of the Black Death, peasant uprisings, and the gunpowder revolution.
    Please take a look at my Patreon page -- -- and offer whatever you can to keep the lectures coming consistently and with quality.


    -Video Upload powered by

  • Dr Vandana Shiva in conversation with Paul Manias produced by Bondi Rocks Media

    34:44

    DR VANDANA SHIVA .... wonderful Indian Eco-warrior, interviewed in Brisbane by Journalist Paul Manias - speaks about the need to preserve bio diversity, to fight bio piracy by Monsanto and preserve farmers varieties of seed.

  • Part 1 Harry Kollatz on the History of Shockoe - 2014 March 29 - Richmond, Virginia

    55:15

    Session Title: Shockoe Bottom: A Long View of Its History and Development

    Presenter: Harry Kollatz, Jr., Senior Writer, harryk@richmag.com

    Session Description: This session provided an overview of the history of Shockoe Bottom and the various residential communities and commercial and manufacturing industries that were in operation prior to and after its settlement by English colonists from since the 19th century. The earliest roots of the City of Richmond can be traced to Shockoe Bottom when, in 1737, William Byrd laid out the town between what is currently known as18th and 25th Streets. Shockoe creek formed the westernmost boundary of the town and served as a barrier to western expansion. Prior to English settlement, the area had been a fishing village and home to members of the Powhatan Confederacy. Its location and physical attributes present opportunities and obstacles to its ongoing growth and development.


    Theme: Shockoe was the place where immigrants to Richmond first settled and the place where the City of Richmond was born. Many significant events happened here.


    A.Native American Presence

    The English arrived in what was to become Virginia in the early 1600s. At the time, Chief Powhatan ruled the Powhatan Confederacy. Christopher Newport was among the first English explorers to land in Eastern Virginia. Narius, a representative of Chief Powhatan, convinced Christopher Newport to settle in eastern Virginia near Jamestown, but after a brief period, Newport decided to advance up the James River.


    B. Little known facts about Shockoe Bottom
    1. The first saloon in Richmond was built in Shockoe. Shockoe Creek was a natural barrier to the development of Richmond.
    2. The name Shockoe Bottom actually didn’t enter the city’s lexicon until the 1970s and is historically known as Shockoe Valley.
    3. The focal point of Shockoe Bottom has always been its food market and remains the location of a popular farmer’s market.
    4. As Richmond developed, Shockoe became the site of a number of factories.
    5. On one occasion, Supreme Court Justice John Marshall bought a turkey at the Shockoe Bottom market and proceeded to carry it to his home in Churchill.


    C. Shockoe Bottom during the Civil War 1. Brothels also populated the area
    2. Civil servants and city commissioners were often bribed to not to enforce laws banning public drinking and brothels
    3. Houses of a number of city commissioners were located in Shockoe Bottom as were a number of brothels owned by city commissioners. One city commissioner attempted to legalize brothels.
    4. This ‘red light district’ was disrupted by the construction of a railway hub at 15th and Main Street, now known as Main Street Station.
    5. President Lincoln arrived at Rocket’s Landing and was transported to Richmond via rowboat by the U.S. Marines. Blacks, German and Dutch immigrants gathered in the streets to catch a glimpse of him.


    D. In the 1920s, engineers discovered uncovered pylons and the bottom of a ship 30 feet below the surface during a rebuilding project around Shockoe Creek.


    Question & Answer Session

    Q: Where did the boundaries between Richmond and Henrico County start and stop?
    A: Richmond and Henrico have always been separate entities. Part of Henrico was annexed because Richmond needed a courthouse.

    Q: What would President Lincoln have seen when he arrived in Richmond on April 4, 1865 in Shockoe?
    A: The area would have been dense with houses and warehouses some of which served as hospitals during the Civil War. There was a prison on Brown’s Island; President Lincoln supposedly wept when he saw [the deplorable conditions in the] prison. President Lincoln offered to let up on the former rebels and go “easy” on them after the war.

    Q: Can you give us more details about the development of Shockoe Bottom in the 1920s?
    A: There had been haphazard digging from various engineering and construction projects but no systematic archaeology has taken place at Shockoe Bottom. Some items found at Shockoe Bottom (during engineering and construction projects) include buried ceramic pottery; a 90-foot long pocket boat; and, under Jamestown, 100 books. [Not much more information was shared from the period in question.]

    Q: Have you come across information about why Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox?
    A: Robert Lee was trapped by the Union Army, so he surrendered at Appomattox. Photographers didn’t get to the courthouse until after his surrender.

    Q: Are there any maps which define the footprint of slave burial grounds at Shockoe Bottom?
    A: None other than that of the Negro Burial Ground that I’m aware of.

    Q: Was the Henrico jailhouse a remnant of slavery?
    A: Not sure, but probably not given the age of the building.

    Read more from the summary,

  • When Witches Cry by Aureliaslight

    4:22

    When Witches Cry by Aureliaslight (composer, recording artist, sound healer and teacher) recorded in 432hz , is from the Goddess Rising Album.
    This video features the beautiful Art of Kamille Freske. Visit Aureliaslight.com for more music to raise consciousness. And find The Art of Kamille Freske at kamillefreske.com

    **************************************
    What is true meaning of a witch? Witch actually means wise woman.
    They are not sinister, They are not of nor worship the Devil. In fact the true witch was quite the contrary. They were the healers and the lovers of nature and the natural world.

    In the earliest centuries of human civilization, witches were the women who served the goddesses and therefore were revered throughout their communities.
    In the Middle East, ancient civilizations not only worshiped powerful female deities, but it was often women who practiced the holiest of rituals.

    Trained in the sacred arts, these priestesses became known as wise women, and may have been some of the earliest manifestations of what we now recognize as the witch.
    These wise women made house calls, were the midwives and delivered babies, dealt with infertility, and cured impotence.

    Wise women or original witches use herbs and other natural elements to promote healing, harmony, love, and wisdom, all following the tenet of “harm none or do no harm

    ‘Malleus Maleficarum'
    In the 1300s, when the plague decimated Europe and killed one in three people, it also brought with it hysteria. The Catholic Church wanted control and to save its followers from the Devil, then, these women the “wise women” had to be tamed.
    By the end of the 1600’s the witch hunts were at their peak. There were some towns in Germany where there were no women left.

    In the late 19th century, the suffragette Matilda Joslyn Gage asserted something revolutionary. The persecution of witches, she said, had nothing to do with fighting evil or resisting the devil. It was simply entrenched social misogyny, the goal of which was to repress the intellect of women.
    A witch, she said, wasn’t wicked. She didn’t fly on a broomstick naked in the dark, or consort with demons. She was, instead, likely to be a woman “of superior knowledge”.

    A witch transgresses norms of female power – punishing her makes others afraid to follow in an unruly woman’s footsteps

    Witches lived long before the development of modern medical technology. The great majority of them were lay healers serving the peasant population, and their suppression marks one of the opening struggles in the history of man’s suppression of women as healers.

  • Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Diaspora Summit III: Academic and Civic Exchanges

    1:18:40

    Moderator: Margarita Varela Rosa, Member, Cenadores PR (Arlington, VA)

    Maria Estefania Barrios, Research Associate, Center for Hydro-Generated Urbanism, School of Architecture, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida (Gainesville, FL)

    Teresita Levy, Associate Professor, Latin American and Puerto Rican Studies, Lehman College, City University of New York (Bronx, NY)

    José Luis Rivera, Founder and President, Puerto Rican Student Association, University of Central Florida (Orlando, FL)

    Rachel Stephenson, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Strategic Partnerships, Office of Academic Affairs, City University of New York (New York, NY)

  • x
  • World History Ep. 8: The Modern Era in the West or, You say you want a revolution?

    37:56

    Revolutions everywhere! An overview of the American, French, Haitian, Mexican, and South American Revolutions. And I'll throw in the Industrial Revolution for free!

  • FutureVisions Ignite Session 4 13 18

    41:22

  • Empires of Native America Lecture

    26:10

    I created this video using my Logitech webcam software.

  • Good Luck

    3:12

    From Becky Warren's 2020 Album, The Sick Season.

    TRACK LISTING:
    1. Appointment with the Blues
    2. Good Luck (You're Gonna Need It)
    3. Favorite Bad Penny
    4. Dickerson Pike
    5. Tired of Sick
    6. Me and These Jeans
    7. Drunk Tonight
    8. Birmingham
    9. RNR
    10. Tommy

    CREDITS:
    All songs by Becky Warren (BMI)

    Guitars: Avril Smith
    Bass: Jeremy Middleton
    Drums: Megan Jane (except tracks 4, 6)

    Producer: Jordan Brooke Hamlin
    Mixed by: Sean O'Brien

    Recorded at: MOXE
    Tracking engineer: Jordan Brooke Hamlin
    Additional Engineering/editing: Helen Vaskevitch
    Mastering: Philip Shaw Bova

    Emily Saliers: Backing vocals on Tired of Sick

    Jordan Brooke Hamlin: Additional guitars on Appointment with the Blues, Organ on Dickerson Pike, Horns on Drunk Tonight, Keys on Favorite Bad Penny and Tommy, and Accordion on Me and These Jeans

    Tiffany Minton: Drums on Me and These Jeans and Dickerson Pike

    Jeremy Middleton: Backing vocals on Tommy

    Kira Small: Backing vocals on RNR

    Ben de la Cour: Backing vocals on Good Luck (You're Gonna Need It)

  • Number 218 - Dave Patterson

    5:23

    Listen: 'Classical Blues Fusion With a Bit of Welding'. Copyright © 2018-2020 Dave Patterson
    Read: '500 Years of Lies - Discover the Extraordinary Number of Native Indian Gifts to the World'

    Passage #18: Disease

    Children and adults alike might be surprised at some of the injustices of the past, whether they are advertent or inadvertent. As history unfolded, disease played a huge, but accidental, role in every regional story without exception. Large populations were lost as European diseases affected the health of the Indigenous. Let us be sure the reader is aware diseases did not travel the other way. The Indians did not spread any disease to the European visitors.

    To properly unpack its implications, I need to become technical here as I cover the disease aspect.

    One of the most important inventions in Europe, the printing press, created an interesting phenomenon. For a little background, the printing press was invented in 1450. Before then, books had been a complete rarity. Then the printing press came along, and by the time 50 or 100 years went by people were enjoying this new freedom. They loved publications. The information from the New World went back to Europe where they were captivated by books and reading and especially fascinated with Indian stories.

    A foundational fact is Europeans during colonization were meeting a lot of peoples, civilizations, states, territories, towns, and villages already decimated and depopulated due to disease. The diseases spread inland very quickly. In turn, reports going back to Europe during the time would quite often be reports from someone meeting Indians in areas recently hit with disease and depopulated.

    It has been realized only recently the extreme quickness with which the diseases spread. In most cases, the disease had already hit towns and villages before the Europeans even arrived in the villages because the volume of trade occurring and the rapidness of the transmission. This fact has had a big impact on history.

    These reports and their ramifications have been called Holmberg's Mistake by Charles Mann, who outlines the flawed research of anthropologist, Allan Holmberg, in one twentieth century example. The Sirionó people lost 95% of their population due to disease. Although a caring and careful companion to the Sirionó tribespeople of South America, the scientist failed to grasp the truth about their condition, or why they appeared to be so primitive. His 1950 writings of their way of life became so influential they helped create the permanent incorrect image of South America’s Indigenous which persists to this day. The phenomenon of Holmberg’s Mistake went on all the way down through the centuries; in the 1500s, 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, and right up into the 1900s.

  • Les tambours de bronze de lAsie du Sud-Est - Conférence Jacques de Guerny

    1:6:00

    Conférence de Jacques de Guerny à l'Institut Français de Hanoï, le 7 novembre 2018.

    Pour en savoir plus sur Jacques de Guerny :

    To know more about the bronze drums (in English):

  • The Young Nation

    31:10

    Historical video overview of the early years of the Rebublic from Washington's first administration through the Monroe Doctrine.

    Student viewing guide and answer key available at:

  • World History Week 6 Lecture 2 - Revolutions

    1:42:46

  • mexico presentation

    12:25

  • Site et situation : Rome avant Rome, les données de larchéologie

    7:17

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    Site et situation : Rome avant Rome, les données de l'archéologie · Stéphane Benoist

    Histoire de Rome (Presses universitaires de France)

    ℗ Presses Universitaires de France / Frémeaux & Associés

    Released on: 2015-03-01

    Music Publisher: D.R
    Author: Stéphane Benoist
    Composer: Stéphane Benoist

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Northern Europe 2

    50:23

    A Journey around the North Coast of Europe – Part 2
    Explore geography and history of Baltic and North Sea areas of Europe, and visit some of the the countries and cities in this region.

  • An Evening with Lloyd Shaw

    55:57

    Richard Marold was director of the Cheyenne Mountain Heritage Center at the time of this presentation. He developed this one man show in which he appears as Dr. Lloyd Pappy Shaw, speaking directly to the audience about his life and times. The 50 minute presentation includes information about Shaw's early life and formative experiences, and of course describes Shaw's role in popularizing American square dance. It also provides a glimpse of Colorado life in the early twentieth century and, in particular, life in the area around Colorado Springs. Note: The audio disappeared from the last few minutes of the VHS tape that recorded this presentation, so that footage, in which Shaw reads from one of his books, has been edited out in this upload. Recorded March 11, 1998, at the Cheyenne Mountain Junior High School, Colorado Springs, CO.

  • Number 118 - Dave Patterson

    5:28

    Listen: 'Classical Blues Fusion With a Bit of Welding'. Copyright © 2018 Dave Patterson
    Read: '500 Years of Lies - Discover the Extraordinary Number of Native Indian Gifts to the World'

    Passage #18: Disease

    Children and adults alike might be surprised at some of the injustices of the past, whether they are advertent or inadvertent. As history unfolded, disease played a huge, but accidental, role in every regional story without exception. Large populations were lost as European diseases affected the health of the Indigenous. Let us be sure the reader is aware diseases did not travel the other way. The Indians did not spread any disease to the European visitors.

    To properly unpack its implications, I need to become technical here as I cover the disease aspect.

    One of the most important inventions in Europe, the printing press, created an interesting phenomenon. For a little background, the printing press was invented in 1450. Before then, books had been a complete rarity. Then the printing press came along, and by the time 50 or 100 years went by people were enjoying this new freedom. They loved publications. The information from the New World went back to Europe where they were captivated by books and reading and especially fascinated with Indian stories.

    A foundational fact is Europeans during colonization were meeting a lot of peoples, civilizations, states, territories, towns, and villages already decimated and depopulated due to disease. The diseases spread inland very quickly. In turn, reports going back to Europe during the time would quite often be reports from someone meeting Indians in areas recently hit with disease and depopulated.

    It has been realized only recently the extreme quickness with which the diseases spread. In most cases, the disease had already hit towns and villages before the Europeans even arrived in the villages because the volume of trade occurring and the rapidness of the transmission. This fact has had a big impact on history.

    These reports and their ramifications have been called Holmberg's Mistake by Charles Mann, who outlines the flawed research of anthropologist, Allan Holmberg, in one twentieth century example. The Sirionó people lost 95% of their population due to disease. Although a caring and careful companion to the Sirionó tribespeople of South America, the scientist failed to grasp the truth about their condition, or why they appeared to be so primitive. His 1950 writings of their way of life became so influential they helped create the permanent incorrect image of South America’s Indigenous which persists to this day. The phenomenon of Holmberg’s Mistake went on all the way down through the centuries; in the 1500s, 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, and right up into the 1900s.

  • Carlo Bergonzi - Nel tuo paterno amplesso

    4:47

    (July 26, 2014) E’ morto il commendatore, anzi il cavalier Bergonzi, che fu il cavaliere del canto verdiano. Sì perfetto, aulico, nobile...


    I due Foscari - Bergonzi/Bruson/Castro-Alberti - Trio: Nel tuo paterno amplesso


    Here is Carlo Bergonzi in Verdi's dark, three-act opera based on a drama by Lord Byron set in 15th century Venice. With Margherita Castro-Alberty and Renato Bruson, Eve Queler conducting, in 1980.

    'The Two Foscari': Francesco Foscari was the longest reigning Doge of Venedig (43 years). In 1445, Foscari's only surviving son, Jacopo, was tried by the Council of Ten on charges of bribery and corruption and exiled from the city. Two further trials, in 1450 and 1456, led to Jacopo's imprisonment on Crete and his eventual death there.
    News of Jacopo's death caused Foscari to withdraw from his government duties, and in October 1457 the Council of Ten forced him to resign. However, his death a week later provoked such public outcry that he was given a state funeral.

    -------------------------------------

    Act 2. Scene 1: The state prison.

    Jacopo is alone in prison and laments his fate. Still delirious, he finds Lucrezia is with him; she tells him of the Council's decision and the punishment of further exile. However, she tries to keep some hope alive and promises to join him in exile if need be. The Doge arrives and declares that in spite of the fact that he was forced to act severely, he loves his son. Jacopo is comforted - In a father's embrace my sorrow is stilled:

    JACOPO:
    Nel tuo paterno amplesso
    io scordo ogni dolore.
    Mi benedici adesso,
    dà forza a questo core,
    e il pane dell'esilio
    men duro fia per me . . .
    Questo innocente figlio
    trovi un conforto in te.

    DOGE:
    Abbi l'amplesso estremo
    d'un genitor cadente;
    il giudice supremo
    protegga l'innocente . . .
    Dopo il terreno esilio
    giustizia eterna v'è.
    Al suo cospetto, o figlio,
    comparirai con me.

    LUCREZIA:
    (Di questo affanno orrendo
    farai vendetta, oh cielo,
    quando nel dì tremendo
    si squarcerà ogni ciglio
    il giusto, il reo qual é!)
    Dopo il terreno esilio,
    sposo, sarò con te.
    (Restano abbracciati piangendo; il Doge si scuote)

    DOGE:
    Addio...

    -------------------------------------

    This opera also showcases a star of a different kind: the legendary city of Venice.

    There's little doubt that Venice has a special magic, all its own, and the numbers prove it. With a population of less than 300,000, Venice entertains 15 million visitors every year.
    Venetian history goes all the way back to the 6th century, when the city was founded by refugees. Later, Venice grew to be one of Europe's most powerful city states, ruled for hundreds of years by a succession of colorful doges and ruthless councils, including the famous Council of Ten. The city's fascinating political history is ripe with conflict and intrigue.
    The city also has a rich musical history. In the 1500's, it gave birth to some of the most spectacular music ever composed — the antiphonal brass and choral works of Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli. Claudio Monteverdi wrote operas for Venice in the early 1600s, and the city gave birth to the first public opera house in 1637. During the next century, Venice became home to of one of the most famous opera houses anywhere, 'La Fenice'.
    Given its rich history, both musical and political, it's no surprise that Venice also became a popular setting for operas. The most famous opera set in Venice is probably Ponchielli's 'La Gioconda'.
    But when it comes to dramatic evocations of Venice's complex and sometimes deadly political history, the opera of choice has to be Verdi's 'I Due Foscari', based on the struggles of a real life, 15th-century doge, Francesco Foscari, and his ill-fated son, Jacopo.

  • Top 30 Tallest Building In The World In 2020

    1:39

    Top 30 Tallest Building In The World In 2020

    Welcome to my channel, please enjoy the data show for you.
    There are other interesting topics of data show.

    If you like my video, you can subscribe to my channel, I will update more interesting data for you.

    ___________________________________________________________________

    Thank you for watching it.
    Love you!

    Data Source: Wikipedia.

  • #110 - Bryan Taylor - “At Some Point, The Stresses Are Going To Be So Great That Some Of The Count

    1:22

    To see links or read the transcript of the episode, visit us at:



    In Episode 110, we welcome author and market data expert, Dr. Bryan Taylor.

    Meb begins by asking how Bryan built the massive financial database that is Global Financial Data. Bryan walks us through how the database developed over time.

    The conversation soon turns to Bryan’s book, Debts, Defaults, Depression and Other Delightful Ditties from the Dismal Science. Bryan tells us this is actually the first of two books. It includes stories about the past that people might find interesting – some of the crazy things that have happened in the financial markets, as well as an inference about what that might mean for the future. The follow-up book will focus on a number of specific cases, from The East India Company, all the way up to some of Trump’s companies.

    Next, Meb changes gears – there are a few contenders getting close to becoming the first $1T company. Meb uses this as a chance to look back at the first $1B company.

    Bryan tells us that title goes to Standard Oil. He then walks us through its history, including its practice of pushing prices down to drive competitors into bankruptcy, the Sherman Anti-trust Act, the break-up of Standard Oil, and the effect on shareholders.

    This conversation dovetails into a conversation about which company today – Apple, Amazon, Facebook, or Google – is more likely to face a threat from government oversight. Listen in to get Bryan’s thoughts.

    The guys then get into inflation. It turns out, the 20th Century had the highest inflation ever. What might be in store for us in the 21st Century? Bryan and Meb discuss this, touching on various governments’ ability to pay debt, growth rates, Bryan’s red-flag metric (when the interest coverage ratio to GDP exceeds 5%), as well as the most likely path for US and global interest rates.

    Meb then uses his recent trip to Greece as a springboard for a discussion about the future of the EU. Bryan tells us it’s an all-or-nothing situation. And the concern now isn’t over Greece, it’s over Italy. It might be the first country to drop out of the Euro. If so, it will face severe consequences in trying to be independent. Plus, it could have a domino effect, leading to other countries leaving and the entire system falling apart. He concludes by telling us that “at some point, the stresses are going to be so great that some of the countries (in the European Union) are eventually forced to leave.”

    Next, Meb moves toward Asia. He brings up a quote from Bryan about the future market-cap of Asian stock markets (as the biggest in the world) and asks if this is a no-brainer “buy Asia” right now. Bryan gives us his thoughts but notes that Asia has lots of internal issues that need solving before they can challenge the US as the primary engine of returns going forward.

    Next up is an interesting discussion of what investing used to be like, how it changed, and how it might change for us going forward. The conversation touches on investing in the 1800s, how World War I flipped everything on its head, and the current concern of nationalism.

    There’s plenty more in this episode – the need to be conscious of how integrated global markets are these days… the historical period that most closely resembles today’s investing climate… what Bryan is working on now… And Bryan’s most memorable trade.

    Get all the details in Episode 110.

  • World History Timeline 1800-1806

    16:07

    This is a Historical timeline covering the years 1800-1806.
    Music:

  • Sustainable Tourism Chapter 3

    28:00

  • Keynote: Victoria Espinel of IPEC @ Summit10

    21:43

    Victoria Espinel, US Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator, Office of Management and Budget delivering her keynote address discussing the role of copyright in the digital age. This clip was recorded on October 5, 2010 in Washington, DC at Georgetown University during FMC's 10th annual Policy Summit.

  • Improve Listening to Spoken English Conversation ★ Learn American English Online ✔

    1:34:58

    Improve Listening to Spoken English Conversation ★ Learn American English Online ✔
    #LearnAmerican #SpeakingPractice #ImproveListening
    English tivi is a free Channel for English learners.
    You can improve vocabulary, practice listening, practice speaking daily with english lesson, english conversation and learn english while you sleeping. Thousands of English Videos are waiting for you. They will help you learn English.
    ☞ Thanks for watching!
    ☞ Please subcribe, like and share if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥

  • Number 119 - Dave Patterson

    7:13

    Listen: 'Classical Blues Fusion With a Bit of Welding'. Copyright © 2018 Dave Patterson
    Read: '500 Years of Lies - Discover the Extraordinary Number of Native Indian Gifts to the World'

    Passage #19:

    These reports and their ramifications have been called Holmberg's Mistake by Charles Mann, who outlines the flawed research of anthropologist, Allan Holmberg, in one twentieth century example. The Sirionó people lost 95% of their population due to disease. Although a caring and careful companion to the Sirionó tribespeople of South America, the scientist failed to grasp the truth about their condition, or why they appeared to be so primitive. His 1950 writings of their way of life became so influential they helped create the permanent incorrect image of South America’s Indigenous which persists to this day. The phenomenon of Holmberg’s Mistake went on all the way down through the centuries; in the 1500s, 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, and right up into the 1900s.

    So on to the next aspect of diseases and more technicalities. The immunization spectrum of the Western Hemisphere inhabitant was very, very narrow. Immunization spectrum refers to the vulnerability of any group when considering how similar one person is compared to the next person. How similar is one person’s immune system compared to another person’s?

    We know from the DNA of the Indigenous populations of the Western Hemisphere their immunization spectrum is very narrow compared to anyone else on earth. It relates to the ancient history of Proto-Indians. We don’t know for sure, yet, if they entered the hemisphere, how they entered, how many times they may have entered, and why they have these narrow immunization spectrums. But their susceptibility to disease factored into world history.

    The lack of immunization spectrum in the Indian population had a great effect on their culture after their introduction to the Europeans. Wherever Europeans went on these two continents the result was always disappearing civilizations. There were no exceptions.

    For example, let's take a look at the black plague. When a major epidemic swept through Europe, a 30% death toll would be considered high. Forty to 60% would be among the worst ever. In the Americas, the common death rate was 80% to 90%, and in some cases the death toll could reach 100%.

    A 95% mortality rate was common enough because there were many examples of Europeans going in and visiting a town that had been depopulated to 5% of the previous population 5 or 10 or 20 years before.

    Let’s first picture a series of towns which lost 95% of their people to smallpox, and then let us add 20 years to the picture. What would we find? We can guess we would fine deteriorated infrastructure, no sense of cultural or community intelligence, continuing recovery from a period of subsistence or famine, lower levels of hunting and food production, untaught young people who grew up as small children fending for themselves, neighbouring villages perhaps fighting over scarce resources, forced alliances, poor health, and lingering mood of grief.

  • Number 18 - Dave Patterson

    3:11

    Listen: 'Classical Blues Fusion With a Bit of Welding'. Copyright © 2018 Dave Patterson
    Read: '500 Years of Lies - Discover the Extraordinary Number of Native Indian Gifts to the World'

    Passage #18: Disease

    Children and adults alike might be surprised at some of the injustices of the past, whether they are advertent or inadvertent. As history unfolded, disease played a huge, but accidental, role in every regional story without exception. Large populations were lost as European diseases affected the health of the Indigenous. Let us be sure the reader is aware diseases did not travel the other way. The Indians did not spread any disease to the European visitors.

    To properly unpack its implications, I need to become technical here as I cover the disease aspect.

    One of the most important inventions in Europe, the printing press, created an interesting phenomenon. For a little background, the printing press was invented in 1450. Before then, books had been a complete rarity. Then the printing press came along, and by the time 50 or 100 years went by people were enjoying this new freedom. They loved publications. The information from the New World went back to Europe where they were captivated by books and reading and especially fascinated with Indian stories.

    A foundational fact is Europeans during colonization were meeting a lot of peoples, civilizations, states, territories, towns, and villages already decimated and depopulated due to disease. The diseases spread inland very quickly. In turn, reports going back to Europe during the time would quite often be reports from someone meeting Indians in areas recently hit with disease and depopulated.

    It has been realized only recently the extreme quickness with which the diseases spread. In most cases, the disease had already hit towns and villages before the Europeans even arrived in the villages because the volume of trade occurring and the rapidness of the transmission. This fact has had a big impact on history.

    These reports and their ramifications have been called Holmberg's Mistake by Charles Mann, who outlines the flawed research of anthropologist, Allan Holmberg, in one twentieth century example. The Sirionó people lost 95% of their population due to disease. Although a caring and careful companion to the Sirionó tribespeople of South America, the scientist failed to grasp the truth about their condition, or why they appeared to be so primitive. His 1950 writings of their way of life became so influential they helped create the permanent incorrect image of South America’s Indigenous which persists to this day. The phenomenon of Holmberg’s Mistake went on all the way down through the centuries; in the 1500s, 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, and right up into the 1900s.

  • Patrick Riley - Energy Tutorial: Wind 101 | GCEP Symposium 2014

    1:45:01

    Energy Tutorial: Wind 101
    Patrick Riley, thermal & mechanical systems, GE Global Research

  • Number 19 - Dave Patterson

    3:49

    Listen: 'Classical Blues Fusion With a Bit of Welding'. Copyright © 2018 Dave Patterson
    Read: '500 Years of Lies - Discover the Extraordinary Number of Native Indian Gifts to the World'

    Passage #19:

    These reports and their ramifications have been called Holmberg's Mistake by Charles Mann, who outlines the flawed research of anthropologist, Allan Holmberg, in one twentieth century example. The Sirionó people lost 95% of their population due to disease. Although a caring and careful companion to the Sirionó tribespeople of South America, the scientist failed to grasp the truth about their condition, or why they appeared to be so primitive. His 1950 writings of their way of life became so influential they helped create the permanent incorrect image of South America’s Indigenous which persists to this day. The phenomenon of Holmberg’s Mistake went on all the way down through the centuries; in the 1500s, 1600s, 1700s, 1800s, and right up into the 1900s.

    So on to the next aspect of diseases and more technicalities. The immunization spectrum of the Western Hemisphere inhabitant was very, very narrow. Immunization spectrum refers to the vulnerability of any group when considering how similar one person is compared to the next person. How similar is one person’s immune system compared to another person’s?

    We know from the DNA of the Indigenous populations of the Western Hemisphere their immunization spectrum is very narrow compared to anyone else on earth. It relates to the ancient history of Proto-Indians. We don’t know for sure, yet, if they entered the hemisphere, how they entered, how many times they may have entered, and why they have these narrow immunization spectrums. But their susceptibility to disease factored into world history.

    The lack of immunization spectrum in the Indian population had a great effect on their culture after their introduction to the Europeans. Wherever Europeans went on these two continents the result was always disappearing civilizations. There were no exceptions.

    For example, let's take a look at the black plague. When a major epidemic swept through Europe, a 30% death toll would be considered high. Forty to 60% would be among the worst ever. In the Americas, the common death rate was 80% to 90%, and in some cases the death toll could reach 100%.

    A 95% mortality rate was common enough because there were many examples of Europeans going in and visiting a town that had been depopulated to 5% of the previous population 5 or 10 or 20 years before.

    Let’s first picture a series of towns which lost 95% of their people to smallpox, and then let us add 20 years to the picture. What would we find? We can guess we would fine deteriorated infrastructure, no sense of cultural or community intelligence, continuing recovery from a period of subsistence or famine, lower levels of hunting and food production, untaught young people who grew up as small children fending for themselves, neighbouring villages perhaps fighting over scarce resources, forced alliances, poor health, and lingering mood of grief.

  • Arboretum Festival 2015 Talks: Unceded Ottawa - The Algonquin & the Outaouais PT.1

    32:58

    Arboretum Festival 2015 / Talks
    Unceded Ottawa - The Algonquin & the Outaouais PT.1

    Saturday, Aug.22, 2015
    Albert Island, Ottawa ON
    Shot & edited by: No Fashion

    In light of the new Zibi development in downtown Ottawa, Arboretum organized a public discussion on the varied experiences, history, and relationships of the Algonquin-Anishinabeg and the region we call the Outaouais (greater Ottawa-Gatineau).

    Panelists:
    Chief Kirby Whiteduck
    Algonquins of Pikwàkanagàn First Nation

    Josée Bourgeois
    (Powwow dancer, Memengweshii Council), Pikwàkanagàn

    Shady Hafez
    (Student – Ottawa/Kitigan Zibi Anishinabe)

    Verna McGregor
    (Minwaashin Lodge), Kitigan Zibi Anishinabe

    Albert Dumont
    (Spiritual Advisor, writer, public speaker), Kitigan Zibi Anishinabe


    Moderator:
    Howard Adler, Artistic Director, Asinabka Film & Media Arts Festival

  • Staten Island Meeting

    1:15:33

    May 20, 2020. Defeat the British Coup with the Space Program
    Diane Sare, Megan Beets

  • Foodies & Farmers | Chris Peterson

    43:21

    The sustainable agriculture movement in Memphis is growing significantly as people become aware of projects like the Alpha Omega Veterans Services farm and the politics and health issues associated with large-scale agriculture.

  • Netherlands Part 2

    29:45

    Amsterdam: The City of Canals: Visit Amsterdam and travel its canal, visits its museums and historic sites, and the surrounding region.
    Rotterdam: Europe’s Largest Port
    Rotterdam is the Netherlands second largest city, its major port, and where the Rhine River reaches the North Sea after its long journey from its source in Switzerland. Learn about the interesting history of the Hotel New York of the Holland-America Line that was the starting point of millions of immigrants on their way to the New World. Learn about the massive flood gates that protect Rotterdam against the North Sea, the city and port of Rotterdam, and the history and geography of the Netherlands.
    Also journey around the Netherlands with visits to Zanse Schans, Madurodam, Alkmaar, and Haarlem.

  • Machinimasound - Battle of Kings ???? ¡1 HOUR! ???? epic movie music ✔️

    1:1:28

    ???????????? PLEASE SUBSCRIBE to our sister channel MegalongMusic.com
    ???????? we really need support to continue working on these videos.
    ???? Link:
    THANK YOU!!! ❤️❤️❤️

  • Dr. Franklin Odo @ SFSU: 2nd Session With Q & A

    11:36

    Dr. Franklin Odo, author of VOICES FROM THE CANEFIELDS:FOLKSONGS FROM JAPANESE IMMIGRANT WORKERS IN HAWAI'I, is the founding director of the Asian Pacific American Program at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.
    Presented & co-sponsored by San Francisco State University Asian American Studies,
    Edison Uno Institute of Nikkei & Uchinanchu Studies, Dilena Takeyama Center For Study of Japan & Japanese Culture (SFSU) & Asian Improv Arts. @ Knuth Hall, Creative Arts Building, San Francisco State University, 1600 Holloway San Francisco, CA 94132 on Monday, March 3, 2014.

Shares

x

Check Also

Menu