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Playlist of Lovie Lee

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  • Modern Talking - Brother Louie

    3:45

    Modern Talking's official music video for 'Brother Louie'.
    Click for the brandnew 2017 Modern Talking album 'Back for Gold':

    Click to listen to Modern Talking on Spotify:

    As featured on 25 Years of Disco Pop. Click to buy the track or album via iTunes:
    Google Play:
    Amazon:

    More from Modern Talking
    You're My Heart, You're My Soul:
    Sexy Sexy Lover:
    Cheri Cheri Lady:

    More great 80s videos here:

    Follow Modern Talking
    Website:
    Facebook:

    Subscribe to Modern Talking on YouTube:

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Lyrics:

    Deep love is a burnin' fire stay
    'cause then the flame grows higher babe
    Don't let him steal your heart
    It's easy easy
    Girl this game can't last forever why
    We cannot live together try
    Don't let him take your love from me

    You're no good can't you see
    Brother Louie Louie Louie
    I'm in love set her free
    Oh she's only lookin' to me
    Only love breaks her heart
    Brother Louie Louie Louie
    Only love's paradise
    Oh she's only lookin' to me

    #ModernTalking #BrotherLouie #Vevo #Pop #OfficialMusicVideo

  • x
  • La Vie En Rose

    2:04

    Listen on Spotify / Apple Music:
    Stream my new EP 'Tamale' now -

    Feeling that spring fever. Hope you guys enjoyed this little cover :)

    FACEBOOK:
    INSTAGRAM:
    TWITTER:
    TUMBLR:
    MAILING LIST:

    As always thanks for listening!

    All my love (and then some),
    - D

  • x
  • Muddy Waters - Youve Got To Love Her With A Feeling - ChicagoFest 1981

    6:54



    In August of 1981, when the undisputed king of Chicago blues headlined ChicagoFest —
    then the Windy City's top outdoor music festival — for two nights, his loyal subjects mobbed Navy
    Pier on the lakefront to hear one of the greatest innovators the idiom had ever produced.

    Muddy Waters led the charge in the late 1940s and early '50s to electrify Delta blues in an
    urban setting. His peerless combo would include such future stars as ace guitarist Jimmy Rogers,
    harmonica virtuoso Little Walter and piano wizard Otis Spann. But Muddy was always at the center
    of the action. His gruff, authoritative vocal delivery and slashing slide guitar define the purest form
    of postwar Chicago blues. Waters' charisma was as immense as his musical vision.

    Born April 4, 1915, in Issaquena County, Mississippi, McKinley Morganfield learned the
    blues while sharecropping on Stovall Plantation. One guitarist particularly influenced him. I never
    seen a man could play at that time as good as Son House, to me. With that big voice he had, he could
    sing, said Muddy. He was preachin' the blues then, and I thought he was the best in the world.

    In late August of 1941 musicologists Alan Lomax and John Work rolled into Coahoma
    County in search of rural gospel and blues talent. They made field recordings of Muddy, with Lomax
    returning the next year to cut more. But those were for the Library of Congress. It was only after
    Muddy migrated north in 1943 that he pursued a career as a professional bluesman.

    As soon as I decided to leave, my mind said, 'Go to Chicago!' he recounted. So I
    came. Pianist Sunnyland Slim introduced Muddy to Leonard Chess, then with the fledgling
    Aristocrat label, in 1947. Waters cut a few small combo sides for the label before reverting to his
    Delta slide attack the following year on I Can't Be Satisfied and I Feel Like Going Home, his
    first hit. When I did them two sides, that's the sides they went nuts over, said Waters.

    I had a band in less than a week, Muddy remembered. Mojo Buford — he was with
    me before, the harp player — said, 'I'll get you some boys that'll cook just like that.' He called in
    about two or three days. He said, 'I'm gonna bring 'em over and let you listen to 'em.' Just that fast,
    I had a band! Buford was joined by guitarists John Primer and Rick Kreher, pianist Lovie Lee,
    bassist Earnest Johnson and drummer Ray Allison. They all instinctively understood Muddy's
    groove.

    After Mannish Boy gets the festivities off to a rousing start, Muddy counts off romping
    shuffles for the ChicagoFest throng, rolling through Jimmy Reed's You Don't Have To Go, Big
    Joe Williams' Baby Please Don't Go, Slim Harpo's I'm A King Bee and his own 1955 gem
    Trouble No More. For the luxuriantly downbeat They Call Me Muddy Waters, he peels off a
    slide solo that makes the hair on the nape of your neck stand up in silent salute.

    In the midst of his rollicking Walking Thru The Park, Muddy brings out fleet-fingered
    guitar wizard Johnny Winter, producer of his 1977 comeback album Hard Again. We met back
    in the '60s in Austin, Texas, recalled Muddy. He was one of the young white kids who was really
    deep into it. Johnny sings Going Down Slow before Waters blasts out a swaggering She's
    Nineteen Years Old, boasting another jaw-dropping slide ride. Winter takes over again vocally for
    a grinding You've Got To Love Her With A Feeling that morphs into Five Long Years when
    local luminary Mighty Joe Young strolls up to the mic, Big Twist following that with a few special
    lyrics for the occasion. Muddy brings it all to a close with a rousing Got My Mojo Working.

    To stay with this music, you got to live with it. Sometimes you might be a little hungry,
    but you got to stay with it. I've been where I couldn't get the right food a lot of times. My icebox
    wasn't full, you know? said Muddy, who passed away not long after this show on April 30, 1983.
    I'm glad it was like that. So when I got to the point that I could get what I want, I think I enjoyed it
    better.

    It's hard to tell who enjoyed those two evenings at ChicagoFest more — the crowd, his
    pals onstage or Muddy himself.

    — Bill Dahl

    Research Materials
    Can't Be Satisfied: The Life And Times Of Muddy Waters, by Robert Gordon
    (Boston & New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2002)

    Spinning Blues Into Gold: The Chess Brothers And The Legendary Chess Records, by Nadine Cohodas
    (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000)

    The Complete Muddy Waters Discography, by Phil Wight and Fred Rothwell
    (Cheshire, England: Blues and Rhythm Pub.)

    Joel Whitburn's Top R&B Singles 1942--1988, by Joel Whitburn
    (Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research Inc., 1988)

    The Official Muddy Waters Web site:

  • La vie en rose - Louis Armstrong

    3:26

    LYRICS

    Hold me close and hold me fast
    The magic spell you cast
    This is la vie en rose

    When you kiss me heaven sighs
    And tho I close my eyes
    I see la vie en rose

    When you press me to your heart
    I'm in a world apart
    A world where roses bloom

    And when you speak...angels sing from above
    Everyday words seem...to turn into love songs

    Give your heart and soul to me
    And life will always be
    La vie en rose

  • x
  • Got My Mojo Workin

    3:19

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Got My Mojo Workin' (Live) · Muddy Waters · The Rolling Stones

    Live At The Checkerboard Lounge

    ℗ 2012 Promotone B.V., exclusively licensed to Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd.

    Released on: 2012-07-09

    Associated Performer, Guitar: John Primer
    Associated Performer, Piano: Lovie Lee
    Associated Performer, Bass Guitar: Earnest Johnson
    Associated Performer, Drums: Ray Allison
    Associated Performer, Harmonica: George 'Mojo' Buford
    Associated Performer, Vocals: Muddy Waters
    Associated Performer, Guitar: Keith Richards
    Associated Performer, Guitar: Ronnie Wood
    Associated Performer, Vocals, Harmonica: Buddy Guy
    Associated Performer, Vocals, Guitar: Junior Wells
    Associated Performer, Vocals: Lefty Dizz
    Associated Performer, Piano: Ian Stewart
    Composer Lyricist: Preston Foster

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • 7일의 왕비 OST TONE AND MANNER

    1:52

    [7일의 왕비 OST] TONE AND MANNER(톤앤매너) - HONEY LOVIE (Official Audio)

    7일의 왕비 ORIGINAL SOUND TRACK
    KBS 수목드라마 7일의 왕비 ORIGINAL SOUND TRACK 이 발매되었다

    !!가슴 아픈 사랑과 충격적이고 비극적인 결말!!
    한치의 전개도 예측할 수 없었던 KBS 수목드라마 7일의 왕비 사극 방송에 처음 외국곡이 삽입되어 화제가 되기도 했으며 유연정(우주소녀), Yael Meyer, 디어 클라우드, 정기고, 프롬 등이 ost에 참여해 많은 이슈를 낳기도 했었다. 특히 드라마가 전개될수록 비극적이고 충격적인 스토리에 시청자들은 가슴을 쓸어내려야만 했다.

    7일의 왕비 ORIGINAL SOUND TRACK 에는 드라마 음악의 거장 이필호 음악감독의 지휘 아래 완성도 높은 연주곡들이 대거 포함되어 있다. 다시 한번 KBS 수목드라마 7일의 왕비의 벅찬 감동을 떠 올려 보자.

    NEW는 영화, 음악, 드라마, 극장사업, 스포츠 등 다양한 엔터테인먼트의 분야를 아우르는 종합 콘텐츠 미디어 그룹입니다.
    MUSIC&NEW의 유튜브 채널을 구독하시고 K-POP 아티스트들의 신곡과 뮤직비디오, 미공개 독점 영상 등을 가장 먼저 만나보세요.

  • x
  • Muddy Waters - They Call Me Muddy Waters - ChicagoFest 1981

    6:34



    In August of 1981, when the undisputed king of Chicago blues headlined ChicagoFest —
    then the Windy City's top outdoor music festival — for two nights, his loyal subjects mobbed Navy
    Pier on the lakefront to hear one of the greatest innovators the idiom had ever produced.

    Muddy Waters led the charge in the late 1940s and early '50s to electrify Delta blues in an
    urban setting. His peerless combo would include such future stars as ace guitarist Jimmy Rogers,
    harmonica virtuoso Little Walter and piano wizard Otis Spann. But Muddy was always at the center
    of the action. His gruff, authoritative vocal delivery and slashing slide guitar define the purest form
    of postwar Chicago blues. Waters' charisma was as immense as his musical vision.

    Born April 4, 1915, in Issaquena County, Mississippi, McKinley Morganfield learned the
    blues while sharecropping on Stovall Plantation. One guitarist particularly influenced him. I never
    seen a man could play at that time as good as Son House, to me. With that big voice he had, he could
    sing, said Muddy. He was preachin' the blues then, and I thought he was the best in the world.

    In late August of 1941 musicologists Alan Lomax and John Work rolled into Coahoma
    County in search of rural gospel and blues talent. They made field recordings of Muddy, with Lomax
    returning the next year to cut more. But those were for the Library of Congress. It was only after
    Muddy migrated north in 1943 that he pursued a career as a professional bluesman.

    As soon as I decided to leave, my mind said, 'Go to Chicago!' he recounted. So I
    came. Pianist Sunnyland Slim introduced Muddy to Leonard Chess, then with the fledgling
    Aristocrat label, in 1947. Waters cut a few small combo sides for the label before reverting to his
    Delta slide attack the following year on I Can't Be Satisfied and I Feel Like Going Home, his
    first hit. When I did them two sides, that's the sides they went nuts over, said Waters.

    I had a band in less than a week, Muddy remembered. Mojo Buford — he was with
    me before, the harp player — said, 'I'll get you some boys that'll cook just like that.' He called in
    about two or three days. He said, 'I'm gonna bring 'em over and let you listen to 'em.' Just that fast,
    I had a band! Buford was joined by guitarists John Primer and Rick Kreher, pianist Lovie Lee,
    bassist Earnest Johnson and drummer Ray Allison. They all instinctively understood Muddy's
    groove.

    After Mannish Boy gets the festivities off to a rousing start, Muddy counts off romping
    shuffles for the ChicagoFest throng, rolling through Jimmy Reed's You Don't Have To Go, Big
    Joe Williams' Baby Please Don't Go, Slim Harpo's I'm A King Bee and his own 1955 gem
    Trouble No More. For the luxuriantly downbeat They Call Me Muddy Waters, he peels off a
    slide solo that makes the hair on the nape of your neck stand up in silent salute.

    In the midst of his rollicking Walking Thru The Park, Muddy brings out fleet-fingered
    guitar wizard Johnny Winter, producer of his 1977 comeback album Hard Again. We met back
    in the '60s in Austin, Texas, recalled Muddy. He was one of the young white kids who was really
    deep into it. Johnny sings Going Down Slow before Waters blasts out a swaggering She's
    Nineteen Years Old, boasting another jaw-dropping slide ride. Winter takes over again vocally for
    a grinding You've Got To Love Her With A Feeling that morphs into Five Long Years when
    local luminary Mighty Joe Young strolls up to the mic, Big Twist following that with a few special
    lyrics for the occasion. Muddy brings it all to a close with a rousing Got My Mojo Working.

    To stay with this music, you got to live with it. Sometimes you might be a little hungry,
    but you got to stay with it. I've been where I couldn't get the right food a lot of times. My icebox
    wasn't full, you know? said Muddy, who passed away not long after this show on April 30, 1983.
    I'm glad it was like that. So when I got to the point that I could get what I want, I think I enjoyed it
    better.

    It's hard to tell who enjoyed those two evenings at ChicagoFest more — the crowd, his
    pals onstage or Muddy himself.

    — Bill Dahl

    Research Materials
    Can't Be Satisfied: The Life And Times Of Muddy Waters, by Robert Gordon
    (Boston & New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2002)

    Spinning Blues Into Gold: The Chess Brothers And The Legendary Chess Records, by Nadine Cohodas
    (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000)

    The Complete Muddy Waters Discography, by Phil Wight and Fred Rothwell
    (Cheshire, England: Blues and Rhythm Pub.)

    Joel Whitburn's Top R&B Singles 1942--1988, by Joel Whitburn
    (Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research Inc., 1988)

    The Official Muddy Waters Web site:

  • Muddy Waters - Got My Mojo Working - ChicagoFest 1981

    2:32



    In August of 1981, when the undisputed king of Chicago blues headlined ChicagoFest —
    then the Windy City's top outdoor music festival — for two nights, his loyal subjects mobbed Navy
    Pier on the lakefront to hear one of the greatest innovators the idiom had ever produced.

    Muddy Waters led the charge in the late 1940s and early '50s to electrify Delta blues in an
    urban setting. His peerless combo would include such future stars as ace guitarist Jimmy Rogers,
    harmonica virtuoso Little Walter and piano wizard Otis Spann. But Muddy was always at the center
    of the action. His gruff, authoritative vocal delivery and slashing slide guitar define the purest form
    of postwar Chicago blues. Waters' charisma was as immense as his musical vision.

    Born April 4, 1915, in Issaquena County, Mississippi, McKinley Morganfield learned the
    blues while sharecropping on Stovall Plantation. One guitarist particularly influenced him. I never
    seen a man could play at that time as good as Son House, to me. With that big voice he had, he could
    sing, said Muddy. He was preachin' the blues then, and I thought he was the best in the world.

    In late August of 1941 musicologists Alan Lomax and John Work rolled into Coahoma
    County in search of rural gospel and blues talent. They made field recordings of Muddy, with Lomax
    returning the next year to cut more. But those were for the Library of Congress. It was only after
    Muddy migrated north in 1943 that he pursued a career as a professional bluesman.

    As soon as I decided to leave, my mind said, 'Go to Chicago!' he recounted. So I
    came. Pianist Sunnyland Slim introduced Muddy to Leonard Chess, then with the fledgling
    Aristocrat label, in 1947. Waters cut a few small combo sides for the label before reverting to his
    Delta slide attack the following year on I Can't Be Satisfied and I Feel Like Going Home, his
    first hit. When I did them two sides, that's the sides they went nuts over, said Waters.

    I had a band in less than a week, Muddy remembered. Mojo Buford — he was with
    me before, the harp player — said, 'I'll get you some boys that'll cook just like that.' He called in
    about two or three days. He said, 'I'm gonna bring 'em over and let you listen to 'em.' Just that fast,
    I had a band! Buford was joined by guitarists John Primer and Rick Kreher, pianist Lovie Lee,
    bassist Earnest Johnson and drummer Ray Allison. They all instinctively understood Muddy's
    groove.

    After Mannish Boy gets the festivities off to a rousing start, Muddy counts off romping
    shuffles for the ChicagoFest throng, rolling through Jimmy Reed's You Don't Have To Go, Big
    Joe Williams' Baby Please Don't Go, Slim Harpo's I'm A King Bee and his own 1955 gem
    Trouble No More. For the luxuriantly downbeat They Call Me Muddy Waters, he peels off a
    slide solo that makes the hair on the nape of your neck stand up in silent salute.

    In the midst of his rollicking Walking Thru The Park, Muddy brings out fleet-fingered
    guitar wizard Johnny Winter, producer of his 1977 comeback album Hard Again. We met back
    in the '60s in Austin, Texas, recalled Muddy. He was one of the young white kids who was really
    deep into it. Johnny sings Going Down Slow before Waters blasts out a swaggering She's
    Nineteen Years Old, boasting another jaw-dropping slide ride. Winter takes over again vocally for
    a grinding You've Got To Love Her With A Feeling that morphs into Five Long Years when
    local luminary Mighty Joe Young strolls up to the mic, Big Twist following that with a few special
    lyrics for the occasion. Muddy brings it all to a close with a rousing Got My Mojo Working.

    To stay with this music, you got to live with it. Sometimes you might be a little hungry,
    but you got to stay with it. I've been where I couldn't get the right food a lot of times. My icebox
    wasn't full, you know? said Muddy, who passed away not long after this show on April 30, 1983.
    I'm glad it was like that. So when I got to the point that I could get what I want, I think I enjoyed it
    better.

    It's hard to tell who enjoyed those two evenings at ChicagoFest more — the crowd, his
    pals onstage or Muddy himself.

    — Bill Dahl

    Research Materials
    Can't Be Satisfied: The Life And Times Of Muddy Waters, by Robert Gordon
    (Boston & New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2002)

    Spinning Blues Into Gold: The Chess Brothers And The Legendary Chess Records, by Nadine Cohodas
    (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000)

    The Complete Muddy Waters Discography, by Phil Wight and Fred Rothwell
    (Cheshire, England: Blues and Rhythm Pub.)

    Joel Whitburn's Top R&B Singles 1942--1988, by Joel Whitburn
    (Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research Inc., 1988)

    The Official Muddy Waters Web site:

  • LOVIE LEE - Tell Me That You Love Me

    5:45

    ALBUM: Earwig Music 20th Anniversary Collection 1999.

  • x
  • Lovie Lees Boogie

    2:13

    Provided to YouTube by Zebralution GmbH

    Lovie Lee's Boogie · Lovie Lee

    American Folk Blues Festival

    ℗ 1983 L+R Records

    Released on: 2009-02-27

    C O M P O S E R: Eddie L. Watson
    L Y R I C I S T: Eddie L. Watson
    M U S I C_ P U B L I S H E R: Lipra Edition

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • I Dare You

    2:49

    Provided to YouTube by The state51 Conspiracy

    I Dare You · Lovie Lee

    Living Chicago Blues, Vol. 3

    ℗ 1980 Alligator Records & Artist Mgmt., Inc

    Released on: 2009-06-18

    Music Publisher: EMI Blackwood obo ATV c/o Harry Fox Agency, 711 3rd Ave. NY, NY 10017
    Composer: Mayfield
    Lyricist: Mayfield

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Tell Me That You Love Me

    5:47

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Tell Me That You Love Me · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Lovie Lee with Carey Bell-I Dare You

    2:46

    Lovie Lee with Carey Bell- I Dare You

  • Sweet Little Girl

    3:14

    Provided to YouTube by The state51 Conspiracy

    Sweet Little Girl · Lovie Lee

    Living Chicago Blues, Vol. 3

    ℗ 1980 Alligator Records & Artist Mgmt., Inc

    Released on: 2009-06-18

    Composer: Watson
    Lyricist: Watson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Nobody Knows My Troubles

    5:19

    Provided to YouTube by The state51 Conspiracy

    Nobody Knows My Troubles · Lovie Lee

    Living Chicago Blues, Vol. 3

    ℗ 1980 Alligator Records & Artist Mgmt., Inc

    Released on: 2009-06-18

    Composer: Watson
    Lyricist: Watson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Lovie Lee with Carey Bell - Sweet little girl

    3:14

    Blues

    Lovie Lee with Carey Bell Sweet little girl

  • Lovie Lee - Chicago Blues Festival Part 1

    2:12

    Lovie Lee (vocal & piano) & S. P. Leary (drums)
    More Blues?

  • Lovie Lee - Mind To Ramble

    2:40

    Lovie Lee from Muddy Waters Band is playing live at the American Folk Blues Festival in 1983. This is Mind To Ramble. Enjoy!

  • Lovie Lee with Carey Bell-Sweet Little Girl

    3:13

    Lovie Lee with Carey Bell-Sweet Little Girl

  • My Lovie Lee

    3:13

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    My Lovie Lee · New Orleans Jazz Band · Sidney Arodin

    New Orleans Jazz Band

    ℗ 2019 Upbeat Recordings

    Released on: 2019-09-23

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • x
  • Lovie Lee - Flip, Flop, And Fly

    2:00

    Lovie Lee from Muddy Waters Band playing Flip, Flop, And Fly from 1983 at The American Folk Blues Festival. Enjoy!

  • Lovie Lee with Carey Bell - Nobody Knows My Troubles

    5:16

    Lovie Lee with Carey Bell .....Nobody Knows My Troubles

  • Lovie Lee with Carey Bell-Naptown

    3:02

    Lovie Lee with Carey Bell-Naptown

  • Lovie Lee - Old Tobacco

    3:58

    Enjoy!

  • Lovie Lee - Lovies Boogie

    3:42

    Enjoy!

  • Lovie Lee - Iko Iko

    1:44

    Lovie Lee had been playing piano forever. When Pinetop Perkins retired from Muddy Waters Band, Lovie Lee was asked to join. This is his version of Iko Iko played live at the American Folk Blues Festival in 1983. Enjoy!

  • Lovie Lee / Good Candy

    5:19

    Lovie Lee - Piano, Vocals
    Carey Bell - Harmonica
    Eddie Taylor - Guitar
    Lurrie Bell - Guitar
    Doug Watson - Bass
    Odie Payne - Drums

  • Lovie Lee Boogie Woogie Piano With West Side Heat 1981

    3:37

    Here is a Cassette Recording Of The Legendary Lovie Lee With The Band West Side Heat. Jon McDonald On Slide Guitar, Steve Arvey On Guitar And Vocals, Lovie Lee Piano, John Baker On Bass and Marvin Jackson On Drums From November 11th 1981. Recorded in Chicago at Molly McGuires.

  • Blues Piano Player Lovie Lee Chief Of Police Chicago 1981

    4:15

    Here is a Cassette Recording Of The Legendary Lovie Lee With The Band West Side Heat Performing Lovie's Classic Chief Of Police With Jon McDonald On Slide Guitar, Steve Arvey On Guitar And Vocals, Lovie Lee Piano, John Baker On Bass and Marvin Jackson On Drums From November 11th 1981. Recorded in Chicago at Molly McGuires.

  • LOVIE LEE & JUST GREAT - TOOK HER DOWN

    2:27

    GREEN EQUALS MUSIC.
    Artist: LOVIE LEE & Just Great
    Track: Took Her Down (Drake - Free Spirit Cover)
    Engineered by GLR

    LIKE LOVIE LEE ON FACEBOOK:

    FOLLOW LOVIE LEE ON TWITTER : @LOVIE_LEE
    FOLLOW JUST GREAT ON TWITTER : @CROWNEDKINGKEV

  • Lovies Boogie

    3:42

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Lovie's Boogie · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • LOVIE LEE - Tell Me That You Love Me

    5:47

  • Lovie Lee - In Trouble

    3:14

    Enjoy!

  • Lovie Lee - Tricky Woman

    5:34

    Enjoy!

  • 17 Lovie Lee - I Dare You

    2:46

    Alligator Blues Piano - 2013

  • Chief Police

    2:47

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Chief Police · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Woke Up This Morning

    2:22

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Woke Up This Morning · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • In Trouble

    3:12

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    In Trouble · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Thinking Of You

    4:11

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Thinking Of You · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Little Girl

    3:13

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Little Girl · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • West Side Woman

    6:33

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    West Side Woman · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Mine To Ramble

    2:14

    Provided to YouTube by Zebralution GmbH

    Mine To Ramble · Lovie Lee

    American Folk Blues Festival

    ℗ 1983 L+R Records

    Released on: 2009-02-27

    C O M P O S E R: Eddie L. Watson
    L Y R I C I S T: Eddie L. Watson
    M U S I C_ P U B L I S H E R: Lipra Edition

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Lovie Lee / Chief Police

    2:49

    Lovie Lee - Piano, Vocals
    Carey Bell - Harmonica
    Eddie Taylor - Guitar
    Lurrie Bell - Guitar
    Doug Watson - Bass
    Odie Payne - Drums

  • Whoopin Thighs

    2:51

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Whoopin' Thighs · Lovie Lee

    Good Candy

    ℗ 1994 Earwig Music Company, Inc.

    Released on: 2005-07-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Naptown

    3:05

    Provided to YouTube by The state51 Conspiracy

    Naptown · Lovie Lee

    Living Chicago Blues, Vol. 3

    ℗ 1980 Alligator Records & Artist Mgmt., Inc

    Released on: 2009-06-18

    Composer: Watson
    Lyricist: Watson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Rock Godz - Michael Blum

    5:25

  • Muddy Waters - Baby Please Dont Go - ChicagoFest 1981

    2:58



    In August of 1981, when the undisputed king of Chicago blues headlined ChicagoFest —
    then the Windy City's top outdoor music festival — for two nights, his loyal subjects mobbed Navy
    Pier on the lakefront to hear one of the greatest innovators the idiom had ever produced.

    Muddy Waters led the charge in the late 1940s and early '50s to electrify Delta blues in an
    urban setting. His peerless combo would include such future stars as ace guitarist Jimmy Rogers,
    harmonica virtuoso Little Walter and piano wizard Otis Spann. But Muddy was always at the center
    of the action. His gruff, authoritative vocal delivery and slashing slide guitar define the purest form
    of postwar Chicago blues. Waters' charisma was as immense as his musical vision.

    Born April 4, 1915, in Issaquena County, Mississippi, McKinley Morganfield learned the
    blues while sharecropping on Stovall Plantation. One guitarist particularly influenced him. I never
    seen a man could play at that time as good as Son House, to me. With that big voice he had, he could
    sing, said Muddy. He was preachin' the blues then, and I thought he was the best in the world.

    In late August of 1941 musicologists Alan Lomax and John Work rolled into Coahoma
    County in search of rural gospel and blues talent. They made field recordings of Muddy, with Lomax
    returning the next year to cut more. But those were for the Library of Congress. It was only after
    Muddy migrated north in 1943 that he pursued a career as a professional bluesman.

    As soon as I decided to leave, my mind said, 'Go to Chicago!' he recounted. So I
    came. Pianist Sunnyland Slim introduced Muddy to Leonard Chess, then with the fledgling
    Aristocrat label, in 1947. Waters cut a few small combo sides for the label before reverting to his
    Delta slide attack the following year on I Can't Be Satisfied and I Feel Like Going Home, his
    first hit. When I did them two sides, that's the sides they went nuts over, said Waters.

    I had a band in less than a week, Muddy remembered. Mojo Buford — he was with
    me before, the harp player — said, 'I'll get you some boys that'll cook just like that.' He called in
    about two or three days. He said, 'I'm gonna bring 'em over and let you listen to 'em.' Just that fast,
    I had a band! Buford was joined by guitarists John Primer and Rick Kreher, pianist Lovie Lee,
    bassist Earnest Johnson and drummer Ray Allison. They all instinctively understood Muddy's
    groove.

    After Mannish Boy gets the festivities off to a rousing start, Muddy counts off romping
    shuffles for the ChicagoFest throng, rolling through Jimmy Reed's You Don't Have To Go, Big
    Joe Williams' Baby Please Don't Go, Slim Harpo's I'm A King Bee and his own 1955 gem
    Trouble No More. For the luxuriantly downbeat They Call Me Muddy Waters, he peels off a
    slide solo that makes the hair on the nape of your neck stand up in silent salute.

    In the midst of his rollicking Walking Thru The Park, Muddy brings out fleet-fingered
    guitar wizard Johnny Winter, producer of his 1977 comeback album Hard Again. We met back
    in the '60s in Austin, Texas, recalled Muddy. He was one of the young white kids who was really
    deep into it. Johnny sings Going Down Slow before Waters blasts out a swaggering She's
    Nineteen Years Old, boasting another jaw-dropping slide ride. Winter takes over again vocally for
    a grinding You've Got To Love Her With A Feeling that morphs into Five Long Years when
    local luminary Mighty Joe Young strolls up to the mic, Big Twist following that with a few special
    lyrics for the occasion. Muddy brings it all to a close with a rousing Got My Mojo Working.

    To stay with this music, you got to live with it. Sometimes you might be a little hungry,
    but you got to stay with it. I've been where I couldn't get the right food a lot of times. My icebox
    wasn't full, you know? said Muddy, who passed away not long after this show on April 30, 1983.
    I'm glad it was like that. So when I got to the point that I could get what I want, I think I enjoyed it
    better.

    It's hard to tell who enjoyed those two evenings at ChicagoFest more — the crowd, his
    pals onstage or Muddy himself.

    — Bill Dahl

    Research Materials
    Can't Be Satisfied: The Life And Times Of Muddy Waters, by Robert Gordon
    (Boston & New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2002)

    Spinning Blues Into Gold: The Chess Brothers And The Legendary Chess Records, by Nadine Cohodas
    (New York: St. Martin's Press, 2000)

    The Complete Muddy Waters Discography, by Phil Wight and Fred Rothwell
    (Cheshire, England: Blues and Rhythm Pub.)

    Joel Whitburn's Top R&B Singles 1942--1988, by Joel Whitburn
    (Menomonee Falls, WI: Record Research Inc., 1988)

    The Official Muddy Waters Web site:

  • Skeeg-A-Lee-Blues

    2:58

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Skeeg-A-Lee-Blues · Lovie Austin

    Complete Jazz Series 1924 - 1926

    ℗ 2008 CJS

    Released on: 2008-10-15

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Boy from Black Bayou

    6:23

    Boy from Black Bayou (Live 1983) · Louisiana Red, Jimmy Rogers, Lovie Lee, Carey Bell, Queen Sylvia, Charles 'Honey Boy' Otis

    Giants of Blues

    ℗ 1984 L+R Records

    Released on: 2016-06-17

    C O M P O S E R: Iverson Minter
    L Y R I C I S T: Iverson Minter
    M U S I C_ P U B L I S H E R: Lipra Edition

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Baby Please Dont Go

    2:01

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Baby Please Don't Go (Live / Instrumental) · Muddy Waters · The Rolling Stones

    Live At The Checkerboard Lounge

    ℗ 2012 Promotone B.V., exclusively licensed to Eagle Rock Entertainment Ltd.

    Released on: 2012-07-09

    Associated Performer, Guitar: John Primer
    Associated Performer, Piano: Lovie Lee
    Associated Performer, Bass Guitar: Earnest Johnson
    Associated Performer, Drums: Ray Allison
    Associated Performer, Harmonica: George 'Mojo' Buford
    Associated Performer, Guitar: Keith Richards
    Associated Performer, Guitar: Ronnie Wood
    Associated Performer, Piano: Ian Stewart
    Associated Performer, Guitar: Lefty Dizz
    Composer Lyricist: McKinley Morganfield

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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