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Playlist of List of Polish composers

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  • Discovering WEIRD and Wonderful POLISH Music

    12:51

    POLAND We’re coming! See you on the 21st of Dec

    More coming soon...

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    List of pieces:
    Ignacy Jan Paderewski (1860-1941)
    Minuet in G


    Grażyna Bacewicz (1909- 1969)
    Sonata no. 2 for violin solo


    Witold Lutosławski(1913-1994)
    Lutoslawski Variations on a theme by Paganini


    Andrzej Panufnik (1914-1991)
    Kolysanka


    Wojciech Kilar (1932 – 2013)
    Orawa


    Henryk Górecki (1933-2010)
    Symphony no. 3


    Krzysztof Penderecki (1933 – )
    Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima




    Tadeusz Wielecki (1954 – )
    ŁAGODNE KOŁYSANIE


    Agata Zubel (1978 – )
    Cascando

  • Frederic Chopin Nocturnes: Chopin piano | Classical Music for relaxation and concentration

    1:12:15

    Chopin Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 (00:04) and Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52 (30:25 ) are performed by Vadim Chaimovich (YT: FB:

    Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 is available for personal listening on iTunes, Google Play and Amazon:







    Best Chopin piano songs. Classical music for relaxation, studying and concentration.
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    Frederic Francois Chopin (22 February or 1 March 1810 -- 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer, virtuoso pianist, and music teacher of French--Polish parentage. He was one of the great masters of Romantic music and has been called the poet of the piano. Chopin was born in Zelazowa Wola, a village in the Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his musical education there. Following the Russian suppression of the Polish November 1830 Uprising, he settled in Paris as part of the Polish Great Emigration. He supported himself as a composer and piano teacher, giving few public performances. From 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French woman writer George Sand. For most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health; he died in Paris in 1849 at the age of 39. The vast majority of Chopin's works are exclusively for solo piano, the most notable exceptions being his two piano concertos. His compositions are technically demanding but emphasize nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the musical form known as the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, etude, impromptu, scherzo, and prelude.

    Frederic Chopin playlist:


    Nocturnes complete:


    W. A. Mozart playlist:


    Nocturne Oubliée in C sharp minor by Markus Staab

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  • Gorécki - Symphonie No.3 - 2nd Movement

    9:23

    Henryk Gorécki (1933) is a polish composer of contemporary classical music. Górecki's most popular piece is his Third Symphony, also known as the Symphony of Sorrowful Songs. The work is slow and contemplative, and each of the three movements are composed for orchestra and solo soprano. The libretto for the first movement is taken from a 15th century lament, while second movement uses the words of a teenage girl, Helena Błażusiak, which she wrote on the wall of a Gestapo prison cell in Zakopane to invoke the protection of the Virgin Mary. The third uses the text of a Silesian folk song which describes the pain of a mother searching for a son killed in the Silesian uprisings. The dominant themes of the symphony are motherhood and separation through war. While the first and third movements are written from the perspective of a parent who has lost a child, the second movement is from that of a child separated from a parent.

    The first paintings are from El Greco (1541-1614) - a painter, sculptor, and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. El Greco's dramatic and expressionistic style was met with puzzlement by his contemporaries but found appreciation in the 20th century. El Greco is regarded as a precursor of both Expressionism and Cubism, while his personality and works were a source of inspiration for poets and writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Nikos Kazantzakis. El Greco has been characterized by modern scholars as an artist so individual that he belongs to no conventional school. He is best known for tortuously elongated figures and often fantastic or phantasmagorical pigmentation, marrying Byzantine traditions with those of Western painting.

    The second paintings are from the austrian painter Egon Schiele (1890-1918). A protégé of Gustav Klimt, Schiele was a major figurative painter of the early 20th century. Schiele's work is noted for its intensity, and the many self-portraits the artist produced. The twisted body shapes and the expressive line that characterize Schiele's paintings and drawings mark the artist as an early exponent of Expressionism, although still strongly associated with the art nouveau movement (Jugendstil).

  • A piano piece by a Polish composer

    2:05

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  • Polska muzyka barokowa Jarzębski Chromatica Polish baroque music dawna Warszawa Canaletto

    3:57

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (playlista) (Early Polish Music)

    Dawna Warszawa na obrazach Canaletta
    (Paintings of early Warsaw by Canaletto (Bernardo Bellotto)):
    1-3 Widok Warszawy z tarasu Zamku Królewskiego
    4-6 Ulica Senatorska z kościołem Reformatów
    7-9 - Wilanów

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders' Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)


    Polska muzyka renesansowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Mikołaj Gomółka
    Wacław z Szamotuł
    Mikołaj z Krakowa
    Marcin Leopolita
    Wojciech Długoraj
    Jakub Polak

    Polska muzyka barokowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Bartłomiej Pękiel
    Mikołaj Zieleński
    Marcin Mielczewski
    Adam Jarzębski
    Grzegorz Gerwazy Gorczycki
    Sylwester Szarzyński
    Andrzej Rohaczewski

  • My Concert I play a Polish famous song Kasztany Composer Z.Korepta

    2:41

    original

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  • 13 GREAT COMPOSERS AND HOW IT FEELS PLAYING THEIR MUSIC

    4:46

    Orchestral Life. Feels Good.

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  • Zygmunt Mycielski, Symphony 1, Polish

    29:07

    Zygmunt Mycielski, Symphony 1, Polish (1951)

    1. Ballada
    2. Scherzo
    3. Elegia
    4. Rondo – Finale

    Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Robert Hollingworth, conductor

    Zygmunt Mycielski was composer, writer, music activist. Born 17 August 1907 in Przeworsk, died 5 August 1987 in Warsaw.
    He completed his Secondary School studies in Kraków and that is also where he was taught music by Father Bernardino Rizzi, an Italian composer, organist and choirmaster. Since 1928, following Karol Szymanowski’s advice, he continued his musical education in the École Normale de Musique in Paris with Paul Dukas and Nadia Boulanger. He was active in the Association of Young Polish Musicians in Paris, and between 1934-36, he was President of this Association. He returned to Poland in 1936 and became involved in composing, publishing in music journals and working as a music critic.

    Mycielski took part in the Second World War, at first during the September Campaign and then in 1940 fighting in France. As a soldier of the Polish Army, he became a prisoner-of-war. Later he was sent as forced labour to a German farm. He returned to Poland after the end of the war.

    Between 1946-48 and 1957-59, he was the co-editor of the Ruch Muzyczny (Music Motion) Journal, in 1960-68 – he was the chief editor of this magazine. He was co-editor of Res Facta, Rocznik Chopinowski (Chopin Yearly) and Chopin Studies. In 1955 he wrote an article in the Przegląd Kulturalny (Culture Review), criticising the isolation of Polish culture from the work of composers around the world. Following the intervention of the Warsaw Pact armies in Czechoslovakia, he published in the Paris Kultura An Open Letter to Czech and Slovak musicians, for which he was persecuted by the communist authorities of the Polish People’s Republic: he was removed from the post of chief editor of Ruch Muzyczny and was subject to strict personal censorship as well as forbidden to leave the country. In 1974, he signed the letter of the 15 intellectuals and artists to the communist authorities of the Polish People’s Republic demanding that Poles living in the USSR be granted access to Polish culture and their own independent education. In 1975, he signed a memorial letter by 59 intellectuals to the authorities regarding the plans for amending the constitution. In 1978, he participated in founding the illegal Academic Education Society – active in student circles.

    Between 1947-48 and 1952-54, Zygmunt Mycielski was Vice-President, and between 1948-49 – he was President of the Main Board of the Polish Composers’ Union, between 1985-87 – member of the presidium, and in the years 1954-57 and 1960-83, he was one of the members of its Qualifications Committee. As from 1983, he was an honorary member of the Polish Composers’ Union.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • UCF Performs - Music of Great Polish Composers

    39:27

    The UCF Symphony Orchestra presents the music of Great Polish Composers including Ayako Yonetani and Laurent Boukobza. (2006) Part 1

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  • UCF Performs - Music of Great Polish Composers

    47:10

    The UCF Symphony Orchestra presents the music of Great Polish Composers including Ayako Yonetani and Laurent Boukobza. (2006) Part 2

  • Polish Swing 1938: Henryk Wars Orch. & Mieczysław Fogg - Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen

    2:43

    Mieczysław Fogg & Orkiestra Henryka Warsa – Czy wiesz, mała Miss? (Do You Know, Little Miss?) [org.. title: Bei Mir bist Du Schoen] Fokstrot (Secunda – Friedwald), Syrena-Electro 1938 (Polish)

    NOTE: This record, quite seriously scratched during the first 15’’ (I did my best to revive the beginning and make it audible) is however a valuable and rare example of recording of Polish swing in the late 1930s. Henryk Wars – the excellent pianist & mogul of prewar Polish composers of the film- and revue music - leads the orchestra which makes on this side a really successful swing-version of the world-hit “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen”. In prewar Poland, the traditional tastes of the most of the record buyers made the producers rely rather on the tangos and sentimental cabaret ballads than the hot Anglo-Saxon rhythms. Younger generation of the jazz musicians in Poland – such as later world-famous trumpeter Adolf Rosner, Franciszek Związek, Łopatowski Brothers and the whole bunch of others complained in their memoirs, that prewar studios of the most influential record companies (Syrena Records, Odeon) were virtually closed before them. The powerful trio in the record market in Poland, that is: Henryk Wars, Henryk Gold and Jerzy Gert (the third being the music director in Polish branch of Odeon) would not allow the new trends in dance music prevail over the “Polish tango” monopoly. Interestingly: being formally against the jazz-influences in record industry during the 1930s, privately all of them were jazz fans, who in the 1920s led the first jazz/dance bands in Poland. Well, the pass of time changes our tastes, indeed.

  • 20 Names of classical composers with correct pronunciation

    1:48

    I am not native nor expert on any of the languages of this video, so don´t take this video as infallible. But I think it should be more accurate than those videos about some random guy trying to teach us how to pronounce these names.

    And also, sorry for the bad quality on some of the audios, specially on russian names: it is the raw archive from google translator so blame google instead of me -_-

  • Penderecki: Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima

    8:39

    -National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra.

    Antoni Wit, Conductor.

  • Romuald Twardowski, Hebraic Melodies

    11:53

    Romuald Twardowski, Hebraic Melodies

    1. Cadenza I. Maestoso
    2. Marcato
    3. Andante
    4. Allegretto

    Romuald Golębiowski, clarinet
    The Elsner Youth Symphony Orchestra
    Piotr Wajrak, conductor

    Romuald Twardowski (born 17 June 1930 in Wilno (Vilnius) is a Polish composer.
    During years of occupation or World War II, he studied violin playing and after the war piano and organ. In the years 1946-1950, he used to be organist in Vilnius churches. In 1952-1957, he studied composition in the conservatory of Vilnius. Later moves to Warsaw and continuous studies at Warsaw Academy of Music in years 1957-60 in Bolesław Woytowicz class. In the years 1963 and 1966 he studied Gregorian chant and medieval polyphony in Nadia Boulanger class in Paris. Since 1971 Romuald Twardowski has been the Professor of Fryderyk Chopin University of Music.

    The 1960s and 1970s were for the composer the most fruitful period.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Józef Wieniawski - Ballade Op. 31

    11:22

    Excuse me, Glenn. But may I have a request (:3)? Have you heard of Józef Wieniawski's (brother of the violinist Henryk Wieniawski) compositions? If you are interested, I hope and wish that you could upload some of his works so that I hope people would know more about his works; such as his Ballade and his second Concert Waltz, for example. (Matthew Adrien)

    Józef Wieniawski (23 May 1837 – 11 November 1912) was a Polish pianist, composer, conductor and teacher. He was born in Lublin, the younger brother of the famous violinist Henryk Wieniawski. After Franz Liszt, he was the first pianist to publicly perform all the études by Chopin. He appeared with Liszt in recitals in Paris, London, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Brussels, Leipzig and Amsterdam. Although now neglected, Józef Wieniawski enjoyed a reputation as one of Europe's finest musicians. At the very end of his life a young journalist asked him how long he intended to serve music. He replied: As long as I remain young!

    Józef Wieniawski studied at the Conservatoire de Paris with Pierre Zimmermann and Antoine François Marmontel in 1847, leaving in 1850. In 1855 he received a scholarship from the Tsar of Russia to study with Franz Liszt in Weimar and from 1856 until 1858 in Berlin with Adolf Bernhard Marx, with whom he studied music theory. After he had performed between 1851 and 1853 as a companion to his brother, he decided to follow a separate career as a piano virtuoso. On concert tours through Europe, he performed not only his own compositions, including the Piano Concerto in G minor, but also the works of composer Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Schumann and Weber. According to Liszt, he was the first pianist after him to perform Chopin's études, all in public. After returning to Paris he established friendly relations with Rossini, Gounod, Berlioz and Wagner, also approaching the Imperial Court and becoming a favorite artist of Napoleon III. He then moved to Moscow where he was named to the piano faculty at the Moscow Conservatory, founded in 1866. Contrary to the affirmations of many established sources, he never became a professor at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels but lived again in this city from 1902. He died in Brussels, aged 75.

    Józef Wieniawski also had works by contemporary Polish composers in the repertoire, such as Stanisław Moniuszko, Moritz Moszkowski, Carl Tausig, Władysław Żeleński, Antoni Stolpe and Edouard Wolff. As a chamber musician he frequently performed with the most renowned violinists, cellists and singers of his time, including Pablo de Sarasate, Henri Vieuxtemps, Apolinary Katski, Eugène Ysaÿe, Jenő Hubay, Leopold Auer, Joseph Joachim, Carlo Alfredo Piatti, Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Louis Diémer, Pauline Viardot and Marcella Sembrich.

    In addition to a symphony and a piano concerto, Wieniawski composed among others a piano sonata, 24 études, two concert études, a ballad in E minor, polonaise, mazurka, barcarolles, impromptus, waltzes, and many short piano pieces. His compositions, written to be played at his own concerts, bear superior artistic qualities and technical difficulties of the highest level, giving so a clear idea of their author's performing abilities. He left 11 mechanical recordings of his piano pieces which to date have not come to light.

    (Wikipedia)

    Please take note that the audio AND sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to a minimum of 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio:
    (Performance by: Tomasz Kamieniak)
    Original sheet music: imslp.org

  • Zygmunt Noskowski, Symphony No 1 in A Major

    44:27

    Zygmunt Noskowski, Symphony No. 1 in A Major

    1. Allegro molto
    2. Adagio cantabile
    3. Vivace
    4. Finale: Allegro con fuoco

    Polish National Symphony Orchestra
    Sławek Wróblewski, conductor

    Zygmunt Noskowski (2 May 1846 – 23 July 1909) was a Polish composer, conductor and teacher.
    Noskowski was born in Warsaw and was originally trained at the Warsaw Conservatory studying violin and composition with Stanisław Moniuszko, graduated with distinction in 1867. A scholarship enabled him to travel to Berlin where between 1872 and 1875, he studied with Friedrich Kiel, one of Europe’s leading teachers of composition. After holding several positions - kapellmeister and conductor of the Bodan Choral Society in Konstanz, Noskowski returned to Warsaw in 1880 where he remained for the rest of his life, professor of composition at the Warsaw Conservatory and conductor of Warsaw Society of Friends and the Warsaw Philharmonic (1905-1908).

    He worked not only as a composer, but also became a famous teacher, a prominent conductor and a journalist. He was one of the leading figures in Polish music during the late 19th century and the first decade of the 20th. He taught virtually all of the important Polish composers of the next generation, including Karol Szymanowski and Grzegorz Fitelberg. He served as head of the Warsaw Music Society from 1880 to 1902 and was considered Poland’s leading composer during the last decade of his life. He died in Warsaw.

    While Noskowski is best known for his orchestral compositions, he composed opera, chamber music, instrumental sonatas and vocal works of importance. Discussing Nowkowski's chamber music, the famous critic and scholar Wilhelm Altmann wrote that it was very effective and deserving of public attention and performance. Judging from the piano quartet written in 1879, one can hear that Noskowski had assimilated the recent musical developments taking place in Central Europe but the music, other than structurally, shows little or no influence of any of the major composers of the time, such as Brahms, Liszt, or Wagner, who were then dominating the scene.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Romuald Twardowski, Piano Concerto No 1

    19:57

    Romuald Twardowski, Piano Concerto No. 1 (1956)

    1. Maestoso. Allegro marcato
    2. Andante
    3. Allegro marcato
    4. Andante
    5. Allegro marcato
    6. Maestoso. Vivace

    Joanna Lawrynowicz. Piano
    The Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic Orchestra in Byalistok
    Wojciech Rajski, conductor

    Romuald Twardowski (born 17 June 1930 in Wilno (Vilnius) is a Polish composer.
    During years of occupation or World War II, he studied violin playing and after the war piano and organ. In the years 1946-1950, he used to be organist in Vilnius churches. In 1952-1957, he studied composition in the conservatory of Vilnius. Later moves to Warsaw and continuous studies at Warsaw Academy of Music in years 1957-60 in Bolesław Woytowicz class. In the years 1963 and 1966 he studied Gregorian chant and medieval polyphony in Nadia Boulanger class in Paris. Since 1971 Romuald Twardowski has been the Professor of Fryderyk Chopin University of Music.

    The 1960s and 1970s were for the composer the most fruitful period.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Old Polish tango in Polish and Hebrew: Graj skrzypku, graj!

    3:09

    Composer: Lidauer, Lyrics: Zdrojewski/Biderman

    One of the most popular Polish tangos in late 30s. It was written by Władysław Lidauer, who died in Warsaw ghetto. Adam Aston under the name of Ben Lewi recorded it in Hebrew for Syrena-Electro already in 30s. The translation was made by Biderman.
    During the II world war, this record found it's way to Tel Aviv. Maybe it was brought there by Adam Aston himself, who came to Palestine with General Anders Polish Army.

    Vocal: Olga Mieleszczuk, Piano: Hadrian Tabęcki, Violin: Grzegorz Lalek, Contrabass: Wojciech Pulcyn, video: Amir Nezer

  • Baroque - the Composers

    7:21

    An AVP made for our finals presenting the known composers of the Baroque era.
    Of all the composers I forgot Bach. =| My Bad. =|

  • The most famous composers. 39: Chopin

    9:12

    Frédéric François Chopin (1 March or 22 February 1810 -- 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist. He is widely considered one of the greatest Romantic composers. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola, a village in the then Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his music education there; he composed many mature works in Warsaw before leaving Poland in 1830 at age 20, shortly before the November 1830 Uprising.
    Following the Russian suppression of the Uprising, he settled in Paris as part of Poland's Great Emigration. During the remaining 19 years of his life, Chopin gave only some 30 public performances, preferring the more intimate atmosphere of the salon; he supported himself by sales of his compositions and as a piano teacher. After some romantic dalliances with Polish women, including an abortive engagement, from 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French writer Amantine Dupin. For most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health; he died in Paris in 1849 at age 39.
    The vast majority of Chopin's works are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces and some songs to Polish texts. His piano works are often technically demanding, with an emphasis on nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, étude, impromptu, scherzo and prélude.

    Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin (Szopen) (en francés, Frédéric François Chopin, Żelazowa Wola, Polonia, 22 de febrero o 1 de marzo de 1810 — París, 17 de octubre de 1849) fue un compositor y virtuoso pianista polaco considerado como uno de los más importantes de la historia. Su perfecta técnica, su refinamiento estilístico y su elaboración armónica han sido comparadas históricamente con las de Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Liszt y Ludwig van Beethoven por su perdurable influencia en la música de tiempos posteriores. La obra de Chopin representa el Romanticismo musical en su estado más puro

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  • Polish Tango: Tadeusz Faliszewski - Jak dawniej , 1934

    3:02

    Tadeusz Faliszewski (aka Jan Pobóg) with Orchestra – Jak dawniej (Przyjdź do mnie...) [As Before /Come Close To Me...] Tango (Kwieciński – Maciejewski) Melodja-Electro 1934 (Polish)

    NOTE: This lovely tango was composed by Tadeusz Kwieciński, who in Warsaw of the 1930s, belonged to the less well-known composer - among the whole crowd of first-class bandleaders and composers of that time, such as Jerzy Petersburski, Zygmunt Karasiński, Henryk Wars or Artur Gold. The greatest prewar hit composed by Tadeusz Kwieciński, was Błękitne Bolero (The Blue Bolero) recorded for Syrena-Electro in Jan, 1939 – just a few months before outbreak of the 2nd World War - by the popular singer Stefan Witas. ( In YT available is only the postwar rendition by Jan Ciżyński ). IN 1945 when war was over, the career of Tadeusz Kwieciński took off - on the contrary to many prewar artists, who either died during the war or emigrated or were silenced by postwar communist regime in Poland. He continued composing, among his postwar hits was a lovely tango-ballade “The Summer Love Affair” (Letnia przygoda) , which was recorded in 1948 by one of the most talented postwar singers Marta Mirska, and became a Polish evergreen thereafter. Kwieciński also led a very good dance band, whose arrangements and recordings – very much resembling the prewar style - belong to the gems of postwar recorded music (briefly preceding the onset of gloomy era of the Stalinist mass songs, through late 1940s - mid-1950s).

    The Polish singer, Tadeusz Faliszewski – in his recordings for Melodja-Electro using the label name Jan Pobóg – was one of the most popular crooners in prewar Poland. He was also very prolific in recording, his career covering the whole epoch of Polish recording industry, from the very last years of acoustical recordings (1927/28) until last days of existence of the Syrena-Record company (which was liquidated as soon as German troops began the occupation of Warsaw, in Sept 1939). Tadeusz Faliszewski was soon arrested and sent to a concentration camp in Germany, where he survived only thanks to his voice – which became a favorite of one of the German attendants. In 1945, after collapse of the Third Reich, Faliszewski did not return to the communist-occupied Poland and traveled to the US, where he continued his artistic activity in Polish emmigrants circles.

  • The most famous composers. 38: Chopin

    4:27

    Frédéric François Chopin (1 March or 22 February 1810 -- 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist. He is widely considered one of the greatest Romantic composers. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola, a village in the then Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his music education there; he composed many mature works in Warsaw before leaving Poland in 1830 at age 20, shortly before the November 1830 Uprising.
    Following the Russian suppression of the Uprising, he settled in Paris as part of Poland's Great Emigration. During the remaining 19 years of his life, Chopin gave only some 30 public performances, preferring the more intimate atmosphere of the salon; he supported himself by sales of his compositions and as a piano teacher. After some romantic dalliances with Polish women, including an abortive engagement, from 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French writer Amantine Dupin. For most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health; he died in Paris in 1849 at age 39.
    The vast majority of Chopin's works are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces and some songs to Polish texts. His piano works are often technically demanding, with an emphasis on nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, étude, impromptu, scherzo and prélude.

    Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin (Szopen) (en francés, Frédéric François Chopin, Żelazowa Wola, Polonia, 22 de febrero o 1 de marzo de 1810 — París, 17 de octubre de 1849) fue un compositor y virtuoso pianista polaco considerado como uno de los más importantes de la historia. Su perfecta técnica, su refinamiento estilístico y su elaboración armónica han sido comparadas históricamente con las de Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Liszt y Ludwig van Beethoven por su perdurable influencia en la música de tiempos posteriores. La obra de Chopin representa el Romanticismo musical en su estado más puro

  • Polska muzyka barokowa Mielczewski Canzona secunda a due Polish baroque music dawna Warszawa

    5:13

    Mielczewski:
    Canzona prima:
    Missa cerviensiana Kyrie i Gloria:
    Missa triumphalis Kyrie:
    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)


    Dawna Warszawa i jej okolice na obrazach Canaletta
    (Paintings of Warsaw by Canaletto (Bernardo Bellotto)):
    Wilanów
    Widok łąk wilanowskich
    Widok Ujazdowa i Łazienek
    Widok Warszawy od strony Pragi

    Polska muzyka renesansowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Mikołaj Gomółka
    Wacław z Szamotuł
    Mikołaj z Krakowa
    Marcin Leopolita
    Wojciech Długoraj
    Jakub Polak

    Polska muzyka barokowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Bartłomiej Pękiel
    Mikołaj Zieleński
    Marcin Mielczewski
    Adam Jarzębski
    Grzegorz Gerwazy Gorczycki
    Sylwester Szarzyński
    Andrzej Rohaczewski

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders' Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)

  • The most famous composers. 37: Chopin

    4:56

    Frédéric François Chopin (1 March or 22 February 1810 -- 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist. He is widely considered one of the greatest Romantic composers. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola, a village in the then Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his music education there; he composed many mature works in Warsaw before leaving Poland in 1830 at age 20, shortly before the November 1830 Uprising.
    Following the Russian suppression of the Uprising, he settled in Paris as part of Poland's Great Emigration. During the remaining 19 years of his life, Chopin gave only some 30 public performances, preferring the more intimate atmosphere of the salon; he supported himself by sales of his compositions and as a piano teacher. After some romantic dalliances with Polish women, including an abortive engagement, from 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French writer Amantine Dupin. For most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health; he died in Paris in 1849 at age 39.
    The vast majority of Chopin's works are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces and some songs to Polish texts. His piano works are often technically demanding, with an emphasis on nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, étude, impromptu, scherzo and prélude.

    Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin (Szopen) (en francés, Frédéric François Chopin, Żelazowa Wola, Polonia, 22 de febrero o 1 de marzo de 1810 — París, 17 de octubre de 1849) fue un compositor y virtuoso pianista polaco considerado como uno de los más importantes de la historia. Su perfecta técnica, su refinamiento estilístico y su elaboración armónica han sido comparadas históricamente con las de Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Liszt y Ludwig van Beethoven por su perdurable influencia en la música de tiempos posteriores. La obra de Chopin representa el Romanticismo musical en su estado más puro

  • Old Polish tango: Tadeusz Faliszewski - Zawsze , 1932

    3:35

    Tadeusz Faliszewski & Ork. Syrena Rekord – Zawsze (Będę Kochał Cię Nad Życie) [Always / I’ll Love You More Than Life] Tango z rewii teatru Morskie Oko „Wesoła podróż” (from Morskie Oko revue „A Jolly Ride”) Muz. F.Melodyst, tekst: A.Włast, Syrena-Electro 1932 (Polish)

    NOTE: Composer of this old tango is Fred (Alfred) Melodyst (also spelled: Melodysta) - a Polish composer and bandleader, who was born in Warsaw in 1894 to the famous multi-generational klezmer family, Melodyst. (Among his cis cousins was internationally famous composer and bandleader Jerzy Petersburski and Artur and Henryk Gold: both of who were also the successful composers and bandleaders in prewar Warsaw). Relatively less popular then his cousins, Fred Melodyst – who was a multi instrumentalist (banjo, viola and the steel saw) – played during the 1920s in several popular dance orchestras in Warsaw (Zygmunt Karasiński and later Artur Gold’s dance orchestras) until in 1927 he formed his own dance-jazz band, billed as “Fred Melodyst & His Jazz”. His orchestra, which promoted mainly the dance hits from USA and Western Europe – became immensely popular in prewar Warsaw. He performed in the most snobbish dance venues “Oaza” and Hotel Bristol in Warsaw as well as, during a ski season, in “Jaszczurówka” in Zakopane. In 1936 he became manager of his own dance-bar Arizona, which became a frequented dance venue in Warsaw and in 1939, briefly before the onset of tWW2, he also founded the restaurant with dancing “Casanova” in city of Łódź. In September 1939 he fought in the ranks of the Polish Army against the German invasion on Poland, and after collapse of the Polish state, he fled to Lwów, where he got under the Soviet occupation. In Soviet Russia, he played as member of the theatre orchestra. In 1942 he managed to get through the USSR to Kazakhstan, to join the Polish army in exile which, due to Sikorski-Stalin agreement of 1942, was formed there by Polish general Władysław Anders. In the Army, Fred Melodyst joined his cousins and friends, who survived the German and Soviet attack on Poland: Jerzy Petersburski, Henryk Wars, Henryk Gold, to name only a few. They all performed in the Army theatre, along the whole combat route of the Polish Army in exile during the 2nd WW: from USSR, via Persia, Middle East, Italy, to France. After the war, Fred Melodyst at first stayed for some time in France, to finally settle in Israel, where he performed in the Dolphin Bar in Tel Aviw, until his sudden death from a heart attack, in 1960.

    This tango is a sentimental story about two lovers, who have their affair in Cracow. The first lines of the lyrics refer to the most characteristic elements of the Cracovian landscape: the Old Town Market and the belfry of St. Mary’s Church - where each day at 12 at noon, the Cracow’s 700 years-old bugle call is played on a trumpet. Therefore, the contains some views of prewar Cracow – one of the most beautiful mediaeval cities in Europe, which, fortunately, during the 2nd WW was one of only a few Polish cities, NOT destroyed by the Germans.

  • Szymon Laks, Polish Suite for orchestra

    19:49

    Szymon Laks, Polish Suite for orchestra (1936)

    1. Molto moderato
    2. Andante
    3. Allegro molto

    Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Guillaume Tourniaire, conductor

    Simon (Szymon) Laks (1 November 1901 – 11 December 1983) was a Polish composer and violinist, who became head of the prisoners' orchestra at Birkenau-Auschwitz
    Simon Laks was born in Warsaw on 1 November 1901. He was born a Russian citizen. He studied mathematics in Vilnius and Warsaw. In 1921, he entered the Conservatoire of Warsaw, the capital of the newly independent Poland. He became a Polish citizen. In 1924, the Warsaw Philharmonic played one of his works in public for the first time. It was the symphonic poem, Farys (now lost). He left Poland for Vienna in 1926. He worked providing piano accompaniment for silent films.

    He then returned to Paris where he continued his musical studies until 1929 at the Conservatoire National. At that time, he spoke Polish, Russian, French, German, and English. He became one of the founder members of the Association for Young Polish Musicians in Paris, founded at the end of 1926 with his help. Many of Laks' works were written for Parisian concerts at this time: his quintet for wind instruments (lost), his second string quartet (lost) and his sonata for cello and piano. In Paris, Simon Laks met Tadeusz Makowski. In the 1930s, he formed a fruitful artistic collaboration with the singer Tola Korian. He wrote songs for her in Polish and French, as well as many songs she had written herself. Simon Laks composed neo-classical music.

    In 1941, Simon Laks, a Jew, was arrested by the German authorities and interned in the camp at Pithiviers, close to Orléans. He was deported to Auschwitz in July 1942. As a musician, he was treated better than most deportees, and survived for more than two years where he was the head of the orchestra at the concentration camp. After the war, he recounted his experience in the book Mélodies d'Auschwitz. He also reflected on the role music had in the extermination. When he arrived in the camp, he noted: …music stand, music stands! (…) Where there are music stands, there must be musicians. You can't have one without the other. Who plays music here? The executioner, or his victims? What type of music do they play? Danses macabres? Funeral songs? Hitlerian chants?

    He said that at Auschwitz, the orchestra played twice a day, at the start, and at the end. The accompanied the Kommandos when they entered and exited the camp gates. He stated that far from being a medium of resistance, music was a supplementary torture instrument, an instrument of total domination. Music aggravated the detainees, physically and morally. It incited the detainees to work, without reflection. On 28 October 1944, he was transferred to the Dachau concentration camp. On 29 April 1945, the camp was liberated by the American army. On 18 May, he was returned to Paris and became a French citizen.

    Simon Laks worked in the baroque and classical genres, the traditional principals and formal construction of instruments combining for tonal harmony. He possessed a sense of proportions, a mastry of polyphonic technique, a rhythmic purity, and a simple and pure style. The many songs of Simon Laks cover many influences: the vocal lyrical romantic tradition of Polish lieds and the French interwar style.
    From 1972, Simon Laks dedicated his writing to translation. He had a passion for linguistic problems, but also for social and political problems. He is the author of a number of books. He died, aged 82, in Paris.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • ♥ POLAND♥ MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI 1702-1770: MAGNIFICAT II & FRA ANGELICO. Wrocław Baroque Orchestra

    9:42

    Premiera na YouTube! ~ Jedno z najpiękniejszych arcydzieł muzyki sakralnej Europy (!).
    To Magnificat (CAŁY!) Marcina Józefa Żebrowskiego, z niezapomnianą, przejmującą i przepiękną w swej melodyce Arią Suscépit Ísrael ~ oraz towarzyszący temu dziełu, wielki Fra Angelico.
    CZĘŚĆ II.
    ***
    Wyk. Iwona Leśniowska-Lubowicz, Jana Reiner, Marzena Michałowska, Aleksandra Lewandowska -- soprany; Markéta Cukrová, Piotr Olech -- alty; Karol Kozłowski,Virgil Hartinger -- tenory; Hugo Oliveira, Tomáš Král-- basy. Wrocław Vocal Consort i Wrocławska Orkiestra Barokowa pod dyrekcją Jarosław Thiela. (Koncert live -- Warszawa, 17.12. 2013)
    ===========================
    * 💓 Suscépit Ísrael púerum suum: recordátus misericórdiae suae. 💓 ~ 0:00

    /-- Ujął się za swoim sługą, Izraelem,
    Pomny na swe miłosierdzie./
    -----------------
    ** Sicut locútus est ad patres nostros: Ábraham, et sémini eius in saecula. ~ 3:30

    /-- Jak przyobiecał naszym ojcom,
    Abrahamowi i jego potomstwu na wieki./
    ---------------------
    *** Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto,
    Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.~ 6:49
    =====================
    ~ The Beauty of Polish Renaissance / Baroque / Classicism (Art & Music) --
    ===========================
    ~ POLSKA MUZYKA / POLISH MUSIC/ XIII - XXI w. (zbiory i opracowania czarmuzyki) --
    ===============================
    ~ MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI -- -- belongs among those 18th century Polish composers whose work is only now being discovered. Żebrowski was a member of the musical establishment of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa, in which he was active during 1748-65 and around 1780 as composer, violinist, bass vocalist and teacher.

    The work of the composer which has come down to us represents a richer output, of which the greatest part is kept in the archives of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa: thirty entries under twenty one catalogue numbers. Moreover, fragments of Żebrowski's work are to be found in the collections of the following chapel music establishments: the parish musical establishment in Szalowa and the musical establishment of the Dominican Fathers in Gidle.


    In respect of the volume of preserved works Żebrowski belongs thus among the foremost l8th century Polish composers known today. This applies not only to vocal-instrumental, but also to purely instrumental music: his Sonatae pro processione are an exceptionally valuable part of the heritage of Polish instrumental music of the pre-classical period.
    Among the vocal-instrumental works, which form the main current of Żebrowski's output, his Mass compositions deserve particular attention. At present there are five known manuscripts containing his Masses, out of which four, kept at Jasna Góra, are complete, and one - belonging to the collection of the parish musical establishment in Szalowa - incomplete. All the Jasna Góra manuscripts have been preserved in very good condition. These are: Missa ex D, Missa Pastoralis, Missa Pastoritia, Missa in B. These compositions were still part of the repertoire of the Kapelle in 1819. Comparing Żebrowski's work with the preserved output of other contemporary composers we can see that he is superior to them in his mastery of compository technique, and above all in inventiveness and creativity in shaping the melodic line.

    ===============================

  • ♥ POLAND♥ MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI 1702-1770: MAGNIFICAT /p.1/ FRA ANGELICO. Wrocław Baroque Orchestra

    18:48

    One of the most beautiful pieces of sacred music: MAGNIFICAT by Marcin Józef ŻEBROWSKI (1702-1770) -- and My fav: FRA ANGELICO! Part I:

    MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI:
    Rorate coeli
    MAGNIFICAT:
    ~ Chorus: Magnificat anima mea
    ~ Aria: Quia respexit (A)
    ~ Aria: Quia fecit mihi magna (S)
    ~ Chorus: Et misericordia
    ~ Aria: Fecit potentiam (B)
    ~ Duo: Deposuit potentes (S&A)
    `~ Chorus: Esurientes implevit bonis
    *
    [~ To be continued (part II) ].
    ------------------------------
    Wyk. Iwona Leśniowska-Lubowicz, Jana Reiner, Marzena Michałowska, Aleksandra Lewandowska -- soprany; Markéta Cukrová, Piotr Olech -- alty; Karol Kozłowski, Virgil Hartinger -- tenory; Hugo Oliveira, Tomáš Král -- basy. Wrocław Vocal Consort i Wrocławska Orkiestra Barokowa pod dyrekcją Jarosław Thiela.
    **************************

     MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI (1702-1770) playlista u czarmuzyki, welcome! --
    -----------------------------------
    The Beauty of Polish Renaissance / Baroque (Art & Music) --
    ======================
    MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI -- -- belongs among those 18th century Polish composers whose work is only now being discovered. Żebrowski was a member of the musical establishment of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa, in which he was active during 1748-65 and around 1780 as composer, violinist, bass vocalist and teacher.
    The work of the composer which has come down to us represents a richer output, of which the greatest part is kept in the archives of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa: thirty entries under twenty one catalogue numbers. Moreover, fragments of Żebrowski's work are to be found in the collections of the following chapel music establishments: the parish musical establishment in Szalowa and the musical establishment of the Dominican Fathers in Gidle.
    In respect of the volume of preserved works Żebrowski belongs thus among the foremost l8th century Polish composers known today. This applies not only to vocal-instrumental, but also to purely instrumental music: his Sonatae pro processione are an exceptionally valuable part of the heritage of Polish instrumental music of the pre-classical period.
    Among the vocal-instrumental works, which form the main current of Żebrowski's output, his Mass compositions deserve particular attention. At present there are five known manuscripts containing his Masses, out of which four, kept at Jasna Góra, are complete, and one - belonging to the collection of the parish musical establishment in Szalowa - incomplete. All the Jasna Góra manuscripts have been preserved in very good condition. These are: Missa ex D, Missa Pastoralis, Missa Pastoritia, Missa in B. These compositions were still part of the repertoire of the Kapelle in 1819. Comparing Żebrowski's work with the preserved output of other contemporary composers we can see that he is superior to them in his mastery of compository technique, and above all in inventiveness and creativity in shaping the melodic line.
    ========================

  • Old Polish-Venetian Valse Caton - sung by Janusz Popławski, 1930

    3:11

    Walc Katon (Valse Caton) from Polish opera „Casanova (Composed by Ludomir Różycki) -- sung by Janusz POPŁAWSKI (tenor) acc. by Warsaw Symphony Orchestra dir. Ludomir Różycki, Columbia 1930 (Polish)

    NOTE: Ludomir RÓŻYCKI (b.1883 in Warsaw, Poland d. 1953 in Katowice, Poland). Polish composer and conductor who belonged to a new-romantic movement in Polish composition school of the turn of 19th/20th centuries. In 1904 he completed studies in Warsaw Conservatory in the class of maestro Aleksander Michałowski (piano) and Zygmunt Noskowski (composition). As a distinctive graduate, he was selected for continuing studies in Berlin Koenigliche Meisterschule under the guidance of Prof. Engelbert Humperdinck. In 1905, Różycki established in Warsaw - together with his famous Polish colleague composer Karol Szymanowski and the violin virtuose Grzegorz Fitelberg, The Cooperative of Young Composers, that promoted worldwide the younger Polish musical talents. In years 1907-11 Różycki directed the orchestra of Opera in Lwów and after several seasons in Berlin and in Paris, he returned to Warsaw where in 1930 he took chair at the Warsaw Music College. He survived the 2nd World War in Poland and after 1945 he settled in Katowice (region of Upper Silesia, Poland) where he held chair in Dept. Of Composition and Conducting of the Higher Music School. From many works he left behind him (several operas and musical poems, many piano preludes, nocturnes, impromptus inspired by the romantic music of Chopin, Tschaikowski or Brahms) only his opera Casanova -- or, to be accurate, one arietta from it called Valse Caton - as well as the ballet version of the symphonic poem Pan Twardowski still belong to a core repertoire of many opera singers and dance theatres in Poland.

    In this version, Valse Caton -- a charming valse brillante with an intertesting, restless and very rich melody line - is sung by Janusz Popławski, the Warsaw tenor who in the 1930s belonged to a group of Polish opera singers being also very successful in operetta theatres or cabarets (e.g. Stanisław Gruszczyński, Stefan Witas, Tola Mankiewiczówna). The recording was made to celebrate new Warsaw premiere of Ludomir Różycki's opera Casanova in 1930, and it was honored by composer's personal conducting of the Warsaw Symphony.

  • Ludomir Rozycki, Anhelli, symphonic Poem

    23:18

    Ludomir Rozycki, Anhelli, symphonic Poem (1909)

    Polish Radio National Symphony Orchestra
    Jan Krenz, conductor

    Ludomir Różycki (18 September 1883 Warsaw – 1 January 1953 Katowice) was a Polish composer and conductor. He was, with Mieczysław Karłowicz, Karol Szymanowski and Grzegorz Fitelberg, a member of the group of composers known as Young Poland, the intention of which was to invigorate the musical culture of their generation in their mother country.

    He was a son of a professor at the Warsaw Conservatory, where he studied piano and composition. He completed his studies with distinction, and then continued his studies in Berlin at the Academy of Music under Engelbert Humperdinck. He began his musical career as a conductor of opera and professor of piano in Lwów in 1907. It was while in Lwów that he began to compose. Subsequently, he moved to Warsaw where he composed many more works in a number of different genres.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Witold Lutosławski, Symphony No 1

    24:46

    Witold Lutosławski, Symphony No. 1

    1. Allegro giusto
    2. Poco adagio
    3. Allegretto
    4. Allegro vivace

    Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Hannu Lintu, conductor

    Witold Roman Lutosławski (25 January 1913 – 7 February 1994) was a Polish composer and orchestral conductor. He was one of the major European composers of the 20th century, and one of the preeminent Polish musicians during his last three decades. He earned many international awards and prizes. His compositions (of which he was a notable conductor) include four symphonies, a Concerto for Orchestra, a string quartet, instrumental works, concertos, and orchestral song cycles.

    During his youth, Lutosławski studied piano and composition in Warsaw. His early works were influenced by Polish folk music. His style demonstrates a wide range of rich atmospheric textures. He began developing his own characteristic composition techniques in the late 1950s. His music from this period onwards incorporates his own methods of building harmonies from small groups of musical intervals. It also uses aleatoric processes, in which the rhythmic coordination of parts is subject to an element of chance.

    During World War II, after escaping German capture, Lutosławski made a living by playing the piano in Warsaw bars. After the war, Stalinist authorities banned his First Symphony for being formalist—allegedly accessible only to an elite. Lutosławski believed such anti-formalism was an unjustified retrograde step, and he resolutely strove to maintain his artistic integrity. In the 1980s, Lutosławski gave artistic support to the Solidarity movement. Near the end of his life, he was awarded the Order of the White Eagle, Poland's highest honour.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • The BEST of CHOPIN - Classical Piano Music for Studying | Chopin Study Music Playlist Mix

    5:4:53

    The Best of Chopin - 5 Hours Piano Playlist Mix.

    This 5-hour Classical Music arrangement features some of the best piano pieces by Frédéric Chopin, the famous Polish composer and pianist of the Romantic era.

    Thank you so much for watching this video. I hope you enjoy it and don't forget to share it!

    Music:
    Ballade no.4 op.52, Mazurka op. 63 no. 3, Nocturne op. 9 no. 2, Waltz op. 34, no. 2 are performed by Vadim Chaimovich (

    - Pictures purchased at Shutterstock and used under a Royalty-Free Subscription License Agreement (
    Source:
    ID Number: 153260503

  • Old Polish Tango: Ork. Henryka Golda - Pocałunek kochanki, 1927

    2:51

    Orkiestra Henryka Golda - Pocałunek kochanki (The Kiss of a Lover) tango z rewii “Tik Tak” w teatrze “Morskie Oko (from the Morskie Oko revue Tic Tac) Muz. Jakub Kagan, Syrena 1927 (Polish; accoustic recording)

    NOTE: Jakub Kagan (1896 – 1942) Polish/Jewish composer, pianist and dance bandleader of the 1920/30s. Born in Nowogródek (now in Belarus), Kagan graduated from the Warsaw Conservatory in 1918 and became member of the Polish Composers Union. In 1919-20 he fought in the Polish–Soviet War, defending Warsaw from the Bolshevic invasion during the victorious Battle of Radzymin of 15th Aug, 1920. In 1922, he formed the Kagan's Jazz Band in Warsaw, performing in hotels (Hotel Bristol), cabarets and theatres (Mirage, Nowości). He began composing at that particular time. In 1927 his tango “Pocałunek kochanki” (The Kiss of a Lover) was a great hit, sung in 1927 by the famous actor Eugeniusz Bodo on stage of theatre Morskie Oko in Warsaw. Two years later, another tango “Złota pantera” (The Golden Panther) which his band performed in a popular mountain spa Żegiestów, became widely popular in Poland, especially when Andrzej Włast wrote the lyrics to the tune and included it in the revue “1000 pięknych dziewcząt” (A Thousand Beautiful Girls) in his theatre Morskie Oko. The song opened all the doors for Jakub Kagan’s career, followed by international tours and concerts in Germany, Austria, and Hungary. His greatest hits were performed by such headliners as Hanka Ordonówna or Adam Aston. After the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany in September 1939, Jakub Kagan was deported to the Warsaw Ghetto where he played piano at the Splendid Café and the Melody Palace to survive. He was killed in 1942 possibly during the murderous Grossaktion Warsaw.
    Dramatic, passionate melody of this tango gives even better feeling when you know the words of this song. They are about a singer, who was well known in the city’s pothouses and taverns, when by the guitar she sung for the guests every night. Then, on the morning after she walked to the circrus, to greet her l“young and beautiful torero”, who had his corrida fights there. Their welcoming kiss was “hot, like the hell’s bottom”. Yet everything in life has its end, and one terrible day, the torero was killed on the arena. And the last kiss, he received on this day was given to him not by his lover, but by the death…

  • Chopin: Piano Concertos 1 & 2

    1:12:08

    Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play):
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    Composer: Frédéric Chopin
    Artists: Ewa Kupiec (piano), Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra, Stanislaw Skrowaczeski (conductor)

    Stanisław Skrowaczewski, world-renowned conductor, is incensed that Chopin’s Piano Concertos are compared so unfavourably to those by other composers, and on this recording he does a masterful job of setting the reputation of these works to rights. The First Concerto dances along with vivacity and outstanding joie de vivre, containing as it does elements of a variety of Polish dances. In the Second Concerto, the composer’s deep understanding of the piano and its colours comes to the fore: his use of harmony is remarkably innovative for its time, pointing far ahead into the future. Chopin shows himself to be the supreme composer for piano, with the soloist well supported by some sublime orchestral writing. Because of Chopin’s penchant for writing the accompaniment on the second piano score, the music has been carefully reconstructed by Chopin scholars, to glorious effect. Polish pianist Ewa Kupiec, compatriot of Stanisław Skrowaczewski, is regularly invited to perform at the world’s leading classical music festivals, with the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung praising her ‘faultless technique’ and ‘ability to shape music with transparency and … impressive richness of colours’. She feels a deep connection to Chopin and other Polish composers, and gave three different Chopin recitals in honour of the 200th anniversary of the composer’s birth. Here she is accompanied by the magnificent Saarbrücken Radio Symphony Orchestra, which was founded in 1937 and is regularly heard throughout Europe thanks to its involvement in the Deutsch-Französische Konzerte radio series.

    The Polish element in Chopin’s concertos is best evident in their third movements: characteristics of the Polish national dances Mazurka and Polonaise abound in these brilliant finales. Both concertos enjoy universal and wide popularity, and count among the most frequently played concertos of the entire repertoire.

    00:00:00 Piano Concerto No. 1 in E Minor, Op. 11: I. Allegro maestoso
    00:19:49 Piano Concerto No. 1 in E Minor, Op. 11: II. Larghetto
    00:29:19 Piano Concerto No. 1 in E Minor, Op. 11: III. Rondo. Vivace
    00:39:24 Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, Op. 21: I. Maestoso
    00:54:05 Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, Op. 21: II. Larghetto
    01:03:34 Piano Concerto No. 2 in F Minor, Op. 21: III. Allegro vivace

  • Polish Foxtrot 1934: Andriusha - Chór Juranda & Ork. Arkadi Flato

    2:44

    Chór Juranda (The Jurand’s Revelers) & Ork. dir. by Arcadi Flato – Andrjusza (Andrusha) Foxtrot (Białostocki – Starski), Odeon 1934 (Polish)

    NOTE: This popular prewar Polish dance tune is entitled “Andrjusha” which is diminutive from the Russian masculine name “Andrei” (Andrew). The “Foxtrot” as it’s written on the label - should be than called the “Russian foxtrot”instead - for it contains evident Russian dance motives. During 1930s in Poland quite a few such “Russian foxtrots” were released by Polish composers and many of them became nationwide hits or even international hits, such as Fanny Gordon’s “Pod samowarem” (By The Samovar) also Fanny Gordon’s “Siemieczki” (The Sunflower Seeds) or Białostocki’s “Katiusza” The popularity of such Russian-inspired songs derived from the public still vivid memory of the not long ago Soviet Revolution in Tzarist Russia in Autumn 1917 followed by the large “White” Russians immigration into Poland. Many of those exiles did stop in Warsaw on their way Westwards and created during the 1920s quite a large Russian minority in Poland (one of them was Fanny Gordon, the composer of several such Polish “Russian foxtrots”). The orchestra is led by Arkadi (or: Arcadi) Flato, the Violinist and bandleader, who fled to Poland in 1933 from Germany, after the seizure of power by NSDAP. The refrain is sung by the second most popular, after famous Chór Dana, Polish revelers’ group: Chór Juranda.

    ATTENTION: This upload is my farewell with this channel for two weeks. Today, I must say “so long” to You, My Dear Friends, for tomorrow night I am flying to my well-deserved holidays in a nice sunny place located by the emerald sea. I will miss you, and my longing to be soon with you again, will accompany my during each day of my stay abroad. Be well and happy,and soon I will see all of you in a very good shape and well relaxed after this really hot and tiring summer. Cheerioo!

  • Unknown composers. Manolusz Prztokowski. REQUIEM

    59:14

    Manolusz Prztokowski (September 26, 1748, Zatory - February 6, 1812, Warszaw) was a polish composer,conductor and pedagogue.

    Wrote a number of operas, liturgical and instrumental compositions, but unfortunately only few works have survived. The list of works includes 2 operas: Liredonda in Corinto (only fragments) and The Legend of Martin Liadowski (fragments), 1 Requiem, 1 Stabat Mater, 1 Te Deum, 8 masses, 10 Shymphonies, 5 cello concertos, 3 violin concertos, 2 flute concertos, 6 quartets, and piano compositions (20 polonaises and piano miniatures).

  • Polish Song of Jemenite Jews

    4:20

    Composers: Henoch Kohn, Moshe Wileński, Hebrew lyrics: Natan Alterman
    Vocal: Olga Mieleszczuk, Lira: Boaz Galili, Saz: Ittai Binnun, video: Marcin Koźlinski
    arrangement: Olga Mieleszczuk

    Two combined songs a la orientale,one was sung by Hanka Ordonówna in Warsaw in 30-thies and second by Soshana Damari in late 40-thies in Tel Aviv. Both written by Polish composers, inspired by Jemen Jews folklore. Great example of orientalism.
    Composer of the first one Henoch Kohn came from Lodz and was part of artistic group Yung Yidish. He composed music to the famous movie The Dybbuk based on the celebrated play of the same name by S. Ansky.
    Second was written by Moshe Wileński, who left Warsaw already in 30-thies and immigrated to Palestine. Together with Natan Alterman - also from Warsaw - they created first Hebrew cabaret Li-La-Lo (For me, for her, for you), which was inspired by cabarets from Warsaw.

  • Unsung Composers: Michał Jelski, Violin Concerto No.2, Lev Gorelik

    9:50

    Michał Jelski (Alexander‏ Karlavič Elski?) (1831-1904) - Violin concerto no 2, Lev Gorelik (Belarusian violinist), Symphony Orchestra of the Belarusian Radio and Television, Anatoly Lapunov (conductor)
    „Michał Jelski (b. Dudzicze, near Minsk, 8 Oct 1831; d. Rusinowicze, near Vilnius, Jan 1904) was a violinist, composer and writer on music. He studied with W. Bańkiewicz in Vilnius and in the 1850s he played in Kiev and Minsk. Then he has decided to improve his performance skills and musical education abroad. From 1860 studied the violin with Lipiński in Dresden, composition with well-known German composer and conductor Franz Lachner in Munich, and violin with the famous Belgian virtuoso Henri Vieuxtemps in Paris, with which it is bound by sincere friendship. From 1861 to 1879 he has given concerts in Kraków, Wrocław, Paris, Frankfurt am Main, Munich, Berlin. The repertoire consisted of the most famous works of the violin music at the time, of Bach, Viotti, Paganini, Vieuxtemps, Ernst, Lipiński, de Bériot, Spohr.
    In 1884 he appeared in the Warsaw Music Society, and then he made a new tour of Germany. In 1902 a big concert in Dudzicze said half-century of his concerts activity.
    He was the author of over 100 musical works, among them - two violin concertos, fantasies on original themes, fantasy themes of Polish folk music, the Sonata-Fantasia, Fantasia Spring concert, mazurkas, polonaises a large number of variations and miniatures. His music is showing a vivid imagination, virtuosity, and sublime melodic richness. Composer paid also a great attention to the Belarusian folklore, collected and recorded examples of instrumental folklore of the Minsk oblast.” (Compilation of approximate translations, made with Google Translator, of short texts from Polish and Belarusian)

    My note: I read and I find out he was a Polish composer, but the concert is on the album Belarusian Music in the 19th Century. I did not go into geographic and historical details, so please anyone who has more information about this composer and teacher to give us. Thank you!

  • Baby, ach te baby - foxtrot from Poland, 1933

    3:08

    Baby (Ach, te baby!) [Women (Oh, These Women!)] Fokstrot z filmu Zabawka (Foxtrott from the film A Toy) (Muz. Roman Palester, Tekst: J. Nel) Orkiestra Cristal-Electro dyr. Jerzy Lederman, Refren śpiewa Duet Corda, Cristal-Electro 1933 (Polish product)

    NOTES: Theres no question, foxtrott Baby, Ach te baby! belongs to Top Ten hits in the history of Polish song. Even a child in Poland is able to murmur the famous beginning of that Eugeniusz Bodo's song from 1933 film Zabawka: Baby, ach te baby!.... But beware! Polish word Baby has nothing to do with English a Baby , meaning a sweetheart, a honey or anything of the sort. Polish baby is the plural of the word baba, which is an abbreviation of Russian babushka - a big strong woman-like type with heavy fists and, sometimes, surprisingly loving heart. A crone? A hag? In Russia, it refers to a type of a peasant woman, most commonly present in the market places. In Poland, however, baba has acquired much softer and even a cuddlesome tint. In a jocular way it is used as a kind of a soft epithet for the whole female gender. Baby, ach te baby meaning, in a very imperfect translation, women, oh these women. Unfortunately, enormous variety of the nouns in the slavonic languages make the subtlity of the meaning of baba or its plural:baby, completely untranslateable into any of Western European languages.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    The song was composed by Roman PALESTER (born 1907 in Śniatyn, died 1989 in Paris) - one of great names in the history of Polish XXth century music. He was a composer and a vice-president (until 1939) of Polish Composers Society, his symphony music won prizes in international music festivals (1930 Ist Prize on Festival of International Contemporary Music Society in London; in 1937- Gold Medal at the World Expo in Paris). Composing popular music, mostly for films e.g. Zabawka (A Toy) with Eugeniusz Bodo or Dziewczęta z Nowolipek (Girls From Nowolipki Street) was merely his hobby. World War 2 meant for him the loss of most of his compositions during the total annihilation of the capital city after the Warsaw Uprising in 1944. From 1945-47 he was nominated for vice-president of Warsaw Conservatory, but due to his openly anti-communist attitude he could not continue his career. After composing music to a couple of films, like the world-famous war dramas Ostatni etap (The Last Etappe) about prisoners of Auschwitz and Ulica Graniczna (Graniczna Street) about the tragedy of the Warsaw Ghetto during the German occupation of Poland, also - the first post-war music melodrama Zakazane piosenki (Forbidden Songs), about love & music in nazi-occupied Warsaw - he emigrated to Munich, where he took directorship of the Cultural Section of Radio Free Europe. Later, he moved to Paris. His works were strictly forbidden in the communist Poland. He is buried at the Montmorency Cemetery.

  • Incantation web

    10:40

    Incantation by Paul Safar
    Kimberlee Uwate - viola, Eric Alterman - Cello, Asya Gulua - piano

    In writing this piece in celebration of modern Poland’s centennial, I decided to model my composition after pieces by two famous Polish composers, Chopin and Gorecki. As I child, I heard my father play the E minor Nocturne quite often and was enveloped in its warm harmonies and omnipresent triplets. As a young adult, I heard the well known recording of Gorecki’s “Symphony of Sorrowful Songs” and was similarly swept up by its simplicity and expansiveness. More recently, I fell upon and fell in love with the Czelaw Milosz poem “Incantation”. I decided to use the poem as direct inspiration for the melodic material in the center of the composition that the viola and cello play. In other words, there is a hidden “song” using the poem in its entirety: one could sing along with the string parts if one wanted. But I like it to be more or less hidden. It’s somehow more magical: like the word incantation. To me, the poem is so uplifiting in its unabashed hope and faith that humanity ultimately always rises above despair and horror. It helps put things in perspective especially knowing all that Milosz went through in his lifetime. The idea of the viola and cello serving as a joined voice was influenced by the composer Lou Harrison and is meant as a metaphor for unity in all forms. Lastly, I snuck in a small allusion to a Beatles song. It seemed appropriate as both the poem and song were written during the same time period and deal with similar sentiments. I am very thankful for the Polish Festival of Portland for this commission and also members of the Delgani String Quartet for its premiere on November 10th, 2018.

    Presented by Cascadia Composers and Polish Festival at the Poland - 100 Years - Free Again Celebration, Nov. 11, 2018, Polish Hall, Portland, Oregon

  • Noskowski - Piano Quartet in D minor, Op.8

    34:11

    Composer: Zygmunt Noskowski (2 May 1846 – 23 July 1909)
    Work Title: Piano Quartet in D minor, Op.8
    Performers: Polish Piano Quartet (piano quartet)

    0:00 - I. Allegro con brio
    8:11 - II. Molto andante cantabile
    17:34 - III. Moderato assai energico
    23:06 - IV. Finale. Adagio quasi recitative - Molto allegro con anima

    Zygmunt Noskowski was a Polish composer, conductor and teacher. He was born in Warsaw and was originally trained at the Warsaw Conservatory studying violin and composition. A scholarship enabled him to travel to Berlin where between 1864 and 1867, he studied with Friedrich Kiel, one of Europe’s leading teachers of composition. After holding several positions abroad, Noskowski returned to Warsaw in 1880 where he remained for the rest of his life.

    He worked not only as a composer, but also became a famous teacher, a prominent conductor and a journalist. He was one of the most important figures in Polish music during the late 19th century and the first decade of the 20th. He taught virtually of all the important Polish composers of the next generation, and is considered today to be the first Polish symphonic composer. He served as head of the Warsaw Music Society from 1880 to 1902 and was considered Poland’s leading composer during the last decade of his life.

    Noskowski’s piano quartet dates from 1879 and clearly shows that he had assimilated all of the recent developments of Central European music. Beyond clearly sounding that it was written during the romantic period by a Central European composer, the Piano Quartet owes nothing, by way of influence, to any of the major composers , such as Brahms or Liszt, who were then dominating the scene. As such, it brings a special freshness despite the familiar tonal territory it covers.

    The opening Allegro con brio begins with a powerful, full-blooded theme that conveys a mood of struggle. The second movement, Molto andante cantabile, has for its main theme an extraordinarily beautiful song-like melody. The very striking third movement, Moderato assai energico, begins with a straight forward, thrusting main theme and then gives way to a sparkling and quicker middle section of great originality and freshness. The finale, Adagio quasi recitativo--Allegro, as the movement's marking indicates, begins with a lengthy, dramatic and moody recitative section played by the violin and piano. But the main part of the movement, Allegro, features a joyous and rambunctious first subject followed by a lyrical and yearning.

    This work is of the first rank and unquestionably belongs in the concert-hall repertoire and yet, it is in no way beyond the ability of competent amateurs whom we feel will derive immense enjoyment from it.

    Sources:



    Source videos:
    1st movement:
    2nd & 3rd movements:
    4th movement:

  • ♥ POLAND♥ MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI 1702-1770: MAGNIFICAT /p.1/ & Herman Han. Wrocław Baroque Orchestra

    18:44

    Premiere on YouTube! One of the most beautiful pieces of sacred music: 💓 MAGNIFICAT (FULL!) by Marcin Józef ŻEBROWSKI (1702-1770) -- PART I (VERSION 2❗) .
    *
    Malarstwo (paint): Koronacja NMP, obraz pędzla Hermana Hana z 1623-1624 roku w Bazylice katedralnej Wniebowzięcia Najświętszej Maryi Panny w Pelplinie
    *
    MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI:
    Rorate coeli.
    MAGNIFICAT:
    ~ Chorus: Magnificat anima mea ) ~ 0:00
    ~ ❤ 💓Aria: Quia respexit (A) 💓 ❤ ~ 1:44
    ~ Aria: Quia fecit mihi magna (S) ~ 5:22
    ~ Chorus: Et misericordia ~ 7:18
    ~ Aria: Fecit potentiam (B) ~ 8:31
    ~ Duo: Deposuit potentes (S&A) ~ 11:32
    ~ Chorus: Esurientes implevit bonis.~ 15:59.

    PART II: Suscépit Ísrael púerum suum; Sicut locútus est; Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto --
    .------------------------------
    Wyk. Iwona Leśniowska-Lubowicz, Jana Reiner, Marzena Michałowska, Aleksandra Lewandowska -- soprany; Markéta Cukrová, Piotr Olech -- alty; Karol Kozłowski, Virgil Hartinger -- tenory; Hugo Oliveira, Tomáš Král -- basy. Wrocław Vocal Consort i Wrocławska Orkiestra Barokowa pod dyrekcją Jarosław Thiela.
    -------------------------
    MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI (1702-1770) playlista u czarmuzyki, welcome! --
    -----------------------------------
    The Beauty of Polish Renaissance / Baroque / Classicism (Art & Music) --
    ======================
    POLSKA MUZYKA / POLISH MUSIC/ XIII - XXI w. (zbiory i opracowania czarmuzyki) --
    ====================================
    MARCIN JÓZEF ŻEBROWSKI -- -- belongs among those 18th century Polish composers whose work is only now being discovered. Żebrowski was a member of the musical establishment of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa, in which he was active during 1748-65 and around 1780 as composer, violinist, bass vocalist and teacher.
    The work of the composer which has come down to us represents a richer output, of which the greatest part is kept in the archives of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa: thirty entries under twenty one catalogue numbers. Moreover, fragments of Żebrowski's work are to be found in the collections of the following chapel music establishments: the parish musical establishment in Szalowa and the musical establishment of the Dominican Fathers in Gidle.
    In respect of the volume of preserved works Żebrowski belongs thus among the foremost l8th century Polish composers known today. This applies not only to vocal-instrumental, but also to purely instrumental music: his Sonatae pro processione are an exceptionally valuable part of the heritage of Polish instrumental music of the pre-classical period.
    Among the vocal-instrumental works, which form the main current of Żebrowski's output, his Mass compositions deserve particular attention. At present there are five known manuscripts containing his Masses, out of which four, kept at Jasna Góra, are complete, and one - belonging to the collection of the parish musical establishment in Szalowa - incomplete. All the Jasna Góra manuscripts have been preserved in very good condition. These are: Missa ex D, Missa Pastoralis, Missa Pastoritia, Missa in B. These compositions were still part of the repertoire of the Kapelle in 1819. Comparing Żebrowski's work with the preserved output of other contemporary composers we can see that he is superior to them in his mastery of compository technique, and above all in inventiveness and creativity in shaping the melodic line.
    ========================

  • ♥POLAND♥ ~ Marcin Żebrowski & van Eyck

    3:50

    POLISH BAROQUE (late baroque, pre-classical time in Poland: ) -- Marcin Józef Żebrowski, Magnificat: Suscepit Israel. Elżbieta Towarnicka -- soprano (-- excellent !!!), Marek Stefański -- organ.
    Art: Jan van Eyck, Ghent Altarpiece -- details.
    -----------------
    Marcin Józef Żebrowski belongs among those 18th century Polish composers whose work is only now being discovered. Żebrowski was a member of the musical establishment of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa, in which he was active during 1748-65 and around 1780 as composer, violinist, bass vocalist and teacher.
    The work of the composer which has come down to us represents a richer output, of which the greatest part is kept in the archives of the Paulite Fathers at Jasna Góra in Częstochowa: thirty entries under twenty one catalogue numbers. Moreover, fragments of Żebrowski's work are to be found in the collections of the following chapel music establishments: the parish musical establishment in Szalowa and the musical establishment of the Dominican Fathers in Gidle.
    In respect of the volume of preserved works Żebrowski belongs thus among the foremost l8th century Polish composers known today. This applies not only to vocal-instrumental, but also to purely instrumental music: his Sonatae pro processione are an exceptionally valuable part of the heritage of Polish instrumental music of the pre-classical period.
    Among the vocal-instrumental works, which form the main current of Żebrowski's output, his Mass compositions deserve particular attention. At present there are five known manuscripts containing his Masses, out of which four, kept at Jasna Góra, are complete, and one - belonging to the collection of the parish musical establishment in Szalowa - incomplete. All the Jasna Góra manuscripts have been preserved in very good condition. These are: Missa ex D, Missa Pastoralis, Missa Pastoritia, Missa in B . -- These compositions were still part of the repertoire of the Kapelle in 1819. Comparing Żebrowski's work with the preserved output of other contemporary composers we can see that he is superior to them in his mastery of compository technique, and above all in inventiveness and creativity in shaping the melodic line.
    .......................
    Marcin Józef Żebrowski (ur. 1702 w Magnuszewie, zm. 29 czerwca 1792? w Wieluniu -- polski skrzypek i kompozytor. W latach 1748-1765 był członkiem Kapeli Jasnogórskiej w klasztorze Paulinów w Częstochowie, jako kompozytor, skrzypek, śpiewak i pedagog. Tworzył kompozycje instrumentalne (sonaty pro processione) i wokalno-instrumentalne (msze, m.in. Pastoritia, Pastoralis, Magnificat, Arie, Duet, ww. Rorate coeli, Mittit ad Virginem, Nieszpory).
    Jego twórczość zalicza się do nurtu wczesnego klasycyzmu z elementami baroku. Częste są w niej nawiązania do polskiego folkloru muzycznego. Jego utwory zachowały się w Częstochowie, w Staniątkach i w krakowskiej bibliotece dominikanów. W zbiorach Biblioteki Jasnogórskiej przechowywanych jest 31 jego utworów.
    ----------------
    Magnificat jest mozaiką tekstów ze Starego Testamentu, zwłaszcza z hymnu Anny (1 Sm 2, 1-10)[1]. Kantyk śpiewany w czasie nieszporów. Nazwa pochodzi od pierwszych jego łacińskich słów: „Magnificat anima mea Dominum („Wielbi dusza moja Pana). Jest to radosna pieśń dziękczynna, oparta na tekstach ze Starego Testamentu, którą według Ewangelii św. Łukasza (1, 46-55) wypowiedziała (lub zaśpiewała) Maryja podczas spotkania ze świętą Elżbietą, krótko po Zwiastowaniu.
    ----------------------
    Magnificat anima mea Dominum,
    et exsultavit spiritus meus in Deo salutári meo,

    quia respexit humilitatem ancillae suae.
    Ecce enim ex hoc beatam me dicent omnes generationes,
    quia fecit mihi magna,

    qui potens est,
    et sanctum nomen eius,
    et misericordia eius in progenies et progenies
    timentibus eum.
    Fecit potentiam in brachio suo,
    dispersit superbos mente cordis sui;
    deposuit potentes de sede
    et exaltavit humiles;
    esurientes implevit bonis
    et divites dimisit inanes.
    -----------------*---------------------

    Suscepit Israel puerum suum,
    recordatus misericordiae suae,

    *Przyjął do łaski sługę Izraela cnego,
    Wspomniał nań, użyczył mu miłosierdzia Swego.

    -----------------*---------------------
    sicut locutus est ad patres nostros,
    Abraham et semini eius in saecula.
    ---------
    Mal. Ołtarz Gandawski /Jan / Hubert van Eyck -- fragmenty.
    ------
    Sound 1600 kb/s

  • Ignace Paderewski, Fantaisie Polonaise Fantasy on Polish Themes, Op 19

    22:39

    Ignace Paderewski, Fantaisie-Polonaise (Fantasy on Polish Themes), Op. 19

    Felicja Blumental, piano
    Tiroler Symphonie Orchester Innsbruck
    Robert Wagner, conductor

    Ignacy Jan Paderewski, (born Nov. 6, 1860, Kuryłówka, Podolia province in Russian Poland—died June 29, 1941, New York, N.Y., U.S.), Polish pianist, composer, and statesman, who was prime minister of Poland in 1919.

    Paderewski was the son of a steward of a Polish landowner. He studied music from 1872 at the Warsaw Conservatory and from 1878 taught piano there, and in 1880 he married one of his pupils, Antonina Korsak, who died in childbirth the following year. Encouraged and financed by the actress Helena Modrzejewska (Modjeska), he studied in Vienna from 1884 to 1887 under Theodor Leschetizky, who did much to improve a limited technique. During this period he also taught at the Strasbourg Conservatory. Between 1887 and 1891 he made his first public appearances as a pianist, in Vienna, Paris, London, and New York City. His success with the public was overwhelming; his personality on the concert platform, like that of Liszt, his predecessor among piano virtuosos, generated a mystical devotion. Among his colleagues, however, he was more envied than respected. Chopin (whose works he edited), Bach, Beethoven, and Schumann were the chief composers of his repertory. In 1898 he settled at Riond Bosson near Morges in Switzerland, and the following year he married Helena Gorska, Baroness von Rosen. In 1901 his opera Manru, dealing with life in the Tatra Mountains, was given at Dresden. In 1909 his Symphony in B Minor was given at Boston, and in that same year he became director of the Warsaw Conservatory.

    Throughout his life Paderewski was a staunch patriot. In 1910 he presented to the city of Kraków a monument commemorating the 500th anniversary of the victory of the Poles over the Teutonic Order. During World War I he became a member of the Polish National Committee and was appointed its representative to the United States, where he urged Pres. Woodrow Wilson to support the cause of Polish independence. Wilson included Poland’s cause as the 13th of his Fourteen Points of Jan. 8, 1918.

    After the war the provisional head of state, Józef Piłsudski, asked Paderewski to form in Warsaw a government of experts free from party tendencies. This was formed on Jan. 17, 1919. Paderewski reserved the portfolio of foreign affairs for himself, but his premiership was not a success. As a virtuoso, Paderewski was accustomed to flattery, and he resented sharp criticism. On Nov. 27, 1919, he resigned the premiership and returned to Riond Bosson; his ambitions to become the president of the revived Poland had been shattered. He never revisited the country. In 1921 he resumed his musical career, giving concerts in Europe and the United States, mainly for war victims.
    At the beginning of World War II, in October 1939, a Polish government-in-exile, formed in Paris with Gen. Władysław Sikorski as prime minister, offered Paderewski the chairmanship of the Polish National Council. After the French capitulation in 1940, he went to the United States. He died soon after and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Prewar Poland: Tadeusz Faliszewski - Maleńka 1934

    3:55

    Jan Pobóg (Tadeusz Faliszewski) & Orchestra - Maleńka (My Little One) Slowfox/chanson (Muz.: Stanisław Ferszko – Słowa: Krzewiński & Brodziński) Melodja-Electro 1934 (Polish)

    NOTE: This song is one of the most beautiful compositions by Stanisław (Shmuel) FERSZKO – a Polish / Jewish composer belonging to the younger generation of pop-music composers in the interwar Warsaw music scene.

    Born in 1914 in Łuck (now in Belarus) Stanisław Ferszko and his elder brother Michał (Mojżesz) – also a talented musician - traveled to Warsaw after death of their parents in 1920. In Warsaw, Michał started studying piano in the class of prof. Aleksander Michałowski and Stanisław attracted attention of the renowned Polish pianist Zbigniew Drzewiecki, who in spite of Stanislaw’s young age opened for him possibility to attend piano class in the Conservatory. Both brothers soon became very popular musicians in Warsaw, they composed dance tunes inspired by American jazz and played in the most popular Warsaw jazz/dance orchestras (Michał played piano in Artur Gold’s dance band and Stanisław joined the pioneer jazz band led by saxophonist Zygmunt Karasiński & violinist Julian Front). Stanisław became famous after composing several enormously popular hits, which were presented on the stages of Warsaw’s cabarets: one was foxtrot “Jedź do Truskawca!” (Go To Truskawiec! – it is the name of a fashionable prewar Polish spa, now in Western Ukraine) and second was slowfox “Bo to się zwykle tak zaczyna” (That’s How It Usually Begins) which was sung on stage by one of the most popular Warsaw actors, Tadeusz Olsza. (This song is also today very popular in Poland). He also composed the operetta “Polowanie na lamparta” (The Leopard Hunting) which was staged in Warsaw in always crowded operetta & musical theatre “8:30” and became so popular, that soon it was also staged in Vienna. In the 1930s Stanisław performed many more popular foxtrots and tangos in Poland (most of them were kept in tone of the ballade or chanson), he played jazz in the Warsaw night clubs and accompanied Wiera Gran: the rising great star of Polish song in the late 1930s. He used to visit sometimes the Syrena Record studio to accompany on piano the artists he was fond of and it is possibly Ferszko's piano accompaniment we can hear in this beautiful Faliszewski’s performance of Ferszko’s song “Maleńka”.

    In 1938 – one year before the Germans started Holocaust in Europe – Stanisław Ferszko decided to join the Jewish resettlement action and emigrated to Palestine, while his elder brother Michał decided to stay in Warsaw and after German invasion on Poland in Sept 1939 he was murdered in a German annihilation camp of Treblinka. Stanisław Ferszko very quickly got rooted in the music life of the new state of Israel. He was so prolific in composing and performing in the most renowned Jerusalem and Tel Aviv hotels and dance venues, that he was soon called the “Gershwin of Israel”. He also composed many songs based on the Jewish folklore, which now belong to the modern Israeli national songbook. In 1950s he moved to USA, where his success continued in Broadway. He released many songs and music shows and for some time he conducted the New York Symphony Orchestra. Stanisław Ferszko died in Miami in 1990. On the day of the 5th anniversary of his death, the In Memoriam concert was organized for him in New York, frequented by over 30 thousands of his fans.

    The last days of this really tiring and hot summer still make us feel lazy, so as a slideshow to this music I chose a set of sunny posters and holiday photos from pre-war Poland.

  • Wojciech Kilar, Requiem pour le Père Kolbe

    14:17

    Wojciech Kilar, Requiem pour le Père Kolbe

    Orchestre Philharmonique National de Pologne
    Kazimierz Kord, conductor

    Wojciech Kilar, Polish composer (born July 17, 1932, Lwow, Pol. [now Lviv, Ukr.]—died Dec. 29, 2013, Katowice, Pol.), wrote the music for more than 130 motion pictures, most notably the haunting, atmospheric scores that enhanced Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula (1992), Jane Campion’s The Portrait of a Lady (1996), and three films directed by Roman Polanski—Death and the Maiden (1994), The Ninth Gate (1999), and The Pianist (2002).

    Kilar’s score for the latter film was nominated for best music by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts award and won the César Award in France. He also worked with such Polish directors as Krzysztof Kieslowski, Andrzej Wajda, and Krzysztof Zanussi.

    Kilar graduated from the State Music Academy in Katowice in 1955, the same year that he composed his first orchestral work, Symphony No. 1 for Strings. He received a grant to study (1959–60) with Nadia Boulanger in Paris but returned to Poland. Throughout his career Kilar moved easily between composing for the cinema and for the concert hall; his work in both genres reflects his interest in Roman Catholicism and traditional Polish folk tunes, as well as the influence of such composers as Maurice Ravel and Arnold Schoenberg.

    Kilar’s best-known classical piece, the symphonic poem Krzesany (1974), was inspired by the people and music of the Tatra Mountains along the Poland-Slovakia border. Kilar received many international awards, and in 2012 he was presented with the Order of the White Eagle (Poland’s highest honour) for his contributions to Polish culture.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Szymanowska Polonaise on a favourite Melody of Prince Józef Poniatowski Smendzianka Polish Romantic

    3:47

    This favourite melody of Prince Józef Poniatowski is probably that military march known as March of Prince Józef Poniatowski (arranged for orchestra by Noskowski):

    Regina Smendzianka - piano
    Score:
    (Polonaise in C major)
    Paintings:
    Portraits of Prince Józef Poniatowski by
    Józef Grassi (2)
    Franciszek Paderewski
    Józef Grassi
    Antoni Brodowski
    Józef Kosiński

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders’ Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)

  • Romuald Twardowski, Concerto for violin

    18:07

    Romuald Twardowski, Concerto for violin

    1. Grave. Andante
    2. Allegro deciso

    Andrzej Gebski, violon and conductor
    The Zenon Brzewski Warsaw String Orchestra

    Romuald Twardowski (born 17 June 1930 in Wilno (Vilnius) is a Polish composer.
    During years of occupation or World War II, he studied violin playing and after the war piano and organ. In the years 1946-1950, he used to be organist in Vilnius churches. In 1952-1957, he studied composition in the conservatory of Vilnius. Later moves to Warsaw and continuous studies at Warsaw Academy of Music in years 1957-60 in Bolesław Woytowicz class. In the years 1963 and 1966 he studied Gregorian chant and medieval polyphony in Nadia Boulanger class in Paris. Since 1971 Romuald Twardowski has been the Professor of Fryderyk Chopin University of Music.

    The 1960s and 1970s were for the composer the most fruitful period.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Chopin - Nocturnes - Solo Piano

    37:17

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    Frederic Chopin
    Nocturnes
    Piano: Vadim Chaimovich
    01 Nocturne in B-Flat Minor, Op. 9, No. 1 00:00
    02 Nocturne in E-Flat Major, Op. 9, No 2 06:37
    03 Nocturne in C-Sharp Minor, Op posth. 11:21
    04 Nocturne in E Minor, Op. posth., 72, No 1 16:06
    05 Nocturne in F-Sharp Major, Op. 15, No. 2 21:08
    06 Nocturne in F Minor, Op. 55, No.1 25:09
    07 Nocturne in C Minor, Op. 48, No. 1 30:27


    Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation.
    The Chopin nocturnes consist of 21 pieces for solo piano written between 1827 and 1846. They are generally considered among the finest short solo works for the instrument and hold an important place in contemporary concert repertoire. Although Chopin did not invent the nocturne, he popularized and expanded on it, building on the form developed by Irish composer John Field.
    Chopin's nocturnes numbered 1 to 18 were published during his lifetime, in twos or threes, in the order of composition. However, numbers 19 and 20 were actually written first, prior to Chopin's departure from Poland, but published posthumously
    One of the greatest innovations made by Chopin to the nocturne was his use of a more freely flowing rhythm, a technique based on the classical music style. Also, Chopin further developed the structure of the nocturne, taking inspiration from the Italian and French opera arias, as well as the sonata form.

    All the best classical music ever on one channel: Beethoven, Mozart, Bach, Schubert, Chopin, Debussy, Wagner, Strauss, Vivaldi, Brahms and many more! Classical music playlist mix, beautiful piano, violin, flute, orchestral masterpieces, classical music for relaxation and reading, background study music for final exams and study time, instrumental music, the greatest composers of all time: Essential Classic!

  • Old Polish tango: Adam Aston & Henryk Wars Orch. - Nie płacz maleńka, 1933

    3:39

    Adam Aston & Ork. Henryka Warsa - Nie płacz maleńka [Don’t Cry, My Little One] Tango z teatru „Morskie Oko” [from the Morskie Oko revue] (Białostocki /Belski) Syrena-Electro 1933 (Polish)

    NOTE: This lovely tango was first sung in 1933 on stage of theatre Morskie Oko in Warsaw, by the renowned Polish comedy film actor and singer Aleksander Żabczyński. This version has been recorded by Henryk Wars’ Orchestra with the refrain sung by popular Polish crooner, Adam Aston.
    Henryk Wars – the prolific composer of the film music, pianist and dance band leader belonged to a group of 4-5 Polish composers and bandleaders who build up the legend of the interwar Polish entertainment business. Besides him, must be mentioned the names of the Gold brothers (Artur and Henryk), Jerzy Petersburski (composer of the world famous tango “Oh, Donna Clara”), Zygmunt Karasiński, Stanisław Ferszko, Szymon Kataszek or composer of this tango Jerzy Białostocki. Thanks to them and to the music they wrote and played, the lively and elegant style of prewar Warsaw’s clubs, cabarets, restaurants and night life made the city be often called “Paris of the Eastern Europe”. Henryk Wars managed to escape in time from Warsaw in the beginning of the 2nd WW and survived the war still performing for the Polish Army in Exile in the USSR and then, following the combat trail of the allied forces in the Western Europe. After 1945 he did not return to Poland – which, according to the Yalta Pact, had been included by force into the Soviet zone – and emigrated to the US. In Hollyywood, he continued a successful career writing music scores to many American movies (in that number, to the tv hit serial |Flipper”, 1963).

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