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Playlist of List of Polish composers

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  • Gorecki Symphony of Sorrowful Songs

    56:14

    Henryk Gorecki
    Symphony No.3, Op.36
    (Symphony of Sorrowful Songs)

    Zofia Kilanowicz, soprano
    Polish National Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Antoni Wit

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  • Frederic Chopin Nocturnes: Chopin piano | Classical Music for relaxation and concentration

    1:12:15

    Chopin Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 (00:04) and Ballade No. 4 in F minor, Op. 52 (30:25 ) are performed by Vadim Chaimovich (YT: FB:

    Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2 is available for personal listening on iTunes, Google Play and Amazon:







    Best Chopin piano songs. Classical music for relaxation, studying and concentration.
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    Frederic Francois Chopin (22 February or 1 March 1810 -- 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer, virtuoso pianist, and music teacher of French--Polish parentage. He was one of the great masters of Romantic music and has been called the poet of the piano. Chopin was born in Zelazowa Wola, a village in the Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his musical education there. Following the Russian suppression of the Polish November 1830 Uprising, he settled in Paris as part of the Polish Great Emigration. He supported himself as a composer and piano teacher, giving few public performances. From 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French woman writer George Sand. For most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health; he died in Paris in 1849 at the age of 39. The vast majority of Chopin's works are exclusively for solo piano, the most notable exceptions being his two piano concertos. His compositions are technically demanding but emphasize nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the musical form known as the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, etude, impromptu, scherzo, and prelude.

    Frederic Chopin playlist:


    Nocturnes complete:


    W. A. Mozart playlist:


    Nocturne Oubliée in C sharp minor by Markus Staab

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  • Discovering WEIRD and Wonderful POLISH Music

    12:51

    POLAND We’re coming! See you on the 21st of Dec

    More coming soon...

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    List of pieces:
    Ignacy Jan Paderewski (1860-1941)
    Minuet in G


    Grażyna Bacewicz (1909- 1969)
    Sonata no. 2 for violin solo


    Witold Lutosławski(1913-1994)
    Lutoslawski Variations on a theme by Paganini


    Andrzej Panufnik (1914-1991)
    Kolysanka


    Wojciech Kilar (1932 – 2013)
    Orawa


    Henryk Górecki (1933-2010)
    Symphony no. 3


    Krzysztof Penderecki (1933 – )
    Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima




    Tadeusz Wielecki (1954 – )
    ŁAGODNE KOŁYSANIE


    Agata Zubel (1978 – )
    Cascando

  • Penderecki: Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima

    8:39

    -National Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra.

    Antoni Wit, Conductor.

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  • Grażyna Bacewicz, Concerto for String Orchestra

    13:18

    Grażyna Bacewicz, Concerto for String Orchestra (1948)

    1. Allegro
    2. Andante
    3. Vivo

    Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of the Polish Radio
    Agnieszka Duczmal, conductor

    Grażyna Bacewicz (5 February 1909 – 17 January 1969) was a Polish composer and violinist.
    Bacewicz was born in Łódź. Like Fryderyk Chopin, she came from a bi-national family and, with a Lithuanian father and a Polish mother, she could choose her national identity. She chose to be Polish, but her brother Witold moved back to Vilnius with her father, and ended up in the U.S. as a leading, though little understood, Lithuanian emigré composer.
    Bacewicz had received hear earliest musical training from her father; she started learning violin, piano and theory when she was five years old. Her other older brother, Kiejstut, became a pianist and frequently accompanied her in performances.
    After enrolling at the Warsaw Conservatory of Music to study violin and piano, in 1928 Bacewicz began studies of philosophy at the University of Warsaw (she completed a year and a half). She continued her music training at the Conservatory, studying composition with Kazimierz Sikorski, violin with Józef Jarzębski and piano with Jan Turczyński; she graduated summa cum laude in 1932.
    She studied composition with Boulanger, and violin with André Touret and Carl Flesch. At that time she adopted the neoclassical style for her compositional language and became the first Polish woman composer to achieve national and international stature.
    In the 1930s she was the principal violinist for the Polish Radio Orchestra, organized by the famous conductor, Grzegorz Fitelberg. During the war, she lived in Warsaw, continuing to compose and giving underground concerts (e.g. premiering her Suite for Two Violins). She also dedicated some time to family life: married in 1936, she gave birth to her only daughter, Alina Biernacka (now a famous painter), in 1942.
    After the war, she returned to work as a professor in the State Conservatory of Music in Łódź. During the Stalinist period from 1945 to 1955, Bacewicz, like all other composers, was subject to an increasing ideological control of the new, socialist government.
    She died of a heart attack in 1969 in Warsaw.


    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Smetana ~ Moldau

    13:14

    The World Rose:

    From Smetana's Ma Vlast

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  • Zygmunt Noskowski, Symphony No 1 in A Major

    44:27

    Zygmunt Noskowski, Symphony No. 1 in A Major

    1. Allegro molto
    2. Adagio cantabile
    3. Vivace
    4. Finale: Allegro con fuoco

    Polish National Symphony Orchestra
    Sławek Wróblewski, conductor

    Zygmunt Noskowski (2 May 1846 – 23 July 1909) was a Polish composer, conductor and teacher.
    Noskowski was born in Warsaw and was originally trained at the Warsaw Conservatory studying violin and composition with Stanisław Moniuszko, graduated with distinction in 1867. A scholarship enabled him to travel to Berlin where between 1872 and 1875, he studied with Friedrich Kiel, one of Europe’s leading teachers of composition. After holding several positions - kapellmeister and conductor of the Bodan Choral Society in Konstanz, Noskowski returned to Warsaw in 1880 where he remained for the rest of his life, professor of composition at the Warsaw Conservatory and conductor of Warsaw Society of Friends and the Warsaw Philharmonic (1905-1908).

    He worked not only as a composer, but also became a famous teacher, a prominent conductor and a journalist. He was one of the leading figures in Polish music during the late 19th century and the first decade of the 20th. He taught virtually all of the important Polish composers of the next generation, including Karol Szymanowski and Grzegorz Fitelberg. He served as head of the Warsaw Music Society from 1880 to 1902 and was considered Poland’s leading composer during the last decade of his life. He died in Warsaw.

    While Noskowski is best known for his orchestral compositions, he composed opera, chamber music, instrumental sonatas and vocal works of importance. Discussing Nowkowski's chamber music, the famous critic and scholar Wilhelm Altmann wrote that it was very effective and deserving of public attention and performance. Judging from the piano quartet written in 1879, one can hear that Noskowski had assimilated the recent musical developments taking place in Central Europe but the music, other than structurally, shows little or no influence of any of the major composers of the time, such as Brahms, Liszt, or Wagner, who were then dominating the scene.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Polish Song of Jemenite Jews

    4:20

    Composers: Henoch Kohn, Moshe Wileński, Hebrew lyrics: Natan Alterman
    Vocal: Olga Mieleszczuk, Lira: Boaz Galili, Saz: Ittai Binnun, video: Marcin Koźlinski
    arrangement: Olga Mieleszczuk

    Two combined songs a la orientale,one was sung by Hanka Ordonówna in Warsaw in 30-thies and second by Soshana Damari in late 40-thies in Tel Aviv. Both written by Polish composers, inspired by Jemen Jews folklore. Great example of orientalism.
    Composer of the first one Henoch Kohn came from Lodz and was part of artistic group Yung Yidish. He composed music to the famous movie The Dybbuk based on the celebrated play of the same name by S. Ansky.
    Second was written by Moshe Wileński, who left Warsaw already in 30-thies and immigrated to Palestine. Together with Natan Alterman - also from Warsaw - they created first Hebrew cabaret Li-La-Lo (For me, for her, for you), which was inspired by cabarets from Warsaw.

  • The Best of Chopin

    1:43:18

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    THE BEST OF CHOPIN

    Douze Etudes Op. 25: No. 1 Aeolian Harp
    Nocturne in B-flat minor Op. 9 No. 1
    Nocturne in F# major Op. 15 No. 2
    Nocturne in B-flat minor Op. 9 No. 1
    Nocturne in B major Op. 32 No. 1
    Nocturne in C minor Op. 48 No. 1
    Nocturne Op. posth. No. 20 in C sharp Minor
    Nocturne in D-flat major Op. 27 No. 2
    Nocturne in E-flat major Op. 9 No. 2
    Nocturne in E minor Op. 72 No. 1
    Nocturne in F# minor Op. 15 No. 2
    Nocturne in F# minor Op. 48 No. 2
    Nocturne in G minor Op. 15 No. 3
    Prelude in E minor Op. 28 No. 4
    Prelude in D-flat major Op. 28 No. 15 Raindrop
    Prelude in A major Op. 28 No. 7
    Polonaise in A-flat major, Op. 53 Heroic Polonaise
    Polonaise in C sharp minor Op. 26 No. 1
    Prelude in E-flat minor Op. 28 No. 14
    Prelude in A-flat major Op. 28 No. 17
    Prelude in F minor Op. 28 No 18
    Prelude in G major Op. 28 No. 3
    Prelude in B minor Op. 28 No. 6
    Prelude in F# minor Op. 28 No. 8
    Scherzo No. 2 Op. 31
    Waltz in F minor Op. 70 No. 2
    Waltz in A minor Op. 34 No. 2
    Waltz in D-flat major Op. 64 No. 1 “Minute Waltz”
    Grande Valse Brillante Op. 18
    Waltz in A Flat major, Op. 69 No. 1

    Frédéric François Chopin (1810 – 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation.

    All of Chopin's compositions include the piano. Most are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces, and some 19 songs set to Polish lyrics. His piano writing was technically demanding and expanded the limits of the instrument: his own performances were noted for their nuance and sensitivity. Chopin invented the concept of the instrumental ballade. His major piano works also include mazurkas, waltzes, nocturnes, polonaises, études, impromptus, scherzos, preludes and sonatas, some published only posthumously. Among the influences on his style of composition were Polish folk music, the classical tradition of J. S. Bach, Mozart, and Schubert, and the atmosphere of the Paris salons of which he was a frequent guest. His innovations in style, harmony, and musical form, and his association of music with nationalism, were influential throughout and after the late Romantic period.

    Thank you so much for watching this video by Halidon Music channel, we hope you enjoyed it! Don't forget to share it and subscribe to our channel

    All the best classical music ever on Halidon Music Youtube Channel: The Best Classical Music Playlist Mix, The Best Classical Music For Studying, Classical Music For Reading, Classical Music For Concentration, Classical Music for Sleeping and Relaxation, Instrumental Music, Background Music, Opera Music, Piano, Violin & Orchestral Masterpieces by the greatest composers of all time.

    The very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Ravel, Dvorák…

    #classicalmusic #classical #piano #chopin

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  • The BEST of CHOPIN ???? Classical Piano Music for Studying ???? Chopin Study Music Playlist Mix

    5:4:53

    This 5-hour Classical Music arrangement playlist features some of the best piano pieces by Frédéric Chopin, the famous Polish composer and pianist of the Romantic era.

    Thank you so much for watching this video. I hope you enjoy it and don't forget to share it!

    Music:
    Ballade no.4 op.52, Mazurka op. 63 no. 3, Nocturne op. 9 no. 2, Waltz op. 34, no. 2 are performed by Vadim Chaimovich (

    - Pictures purchased at Shutterstock and used under a Royalty-Free Subscription License Agreement (
    Source:

    User ID: 166132752
    Order ID: SSTK-0C4T1-7A22


    #chopin #piano #classicalmusic

  • Frédéric Chopin - Prelude in E-Minor

    2:45

    Frédéric Chopin-Prelude in E-Minor (op.28 no. 4)

    Played by: Aldona Dvarionaite

    Fryderyk Chopin (Polish: Fryderyk [Franciszek] Chopin, sometimes Szopen; French: Frédéric [François] Chopin;March 1, 1810 -- October 17, 1849) was a Polish virtuoso pianist and piano composer of the Romantic period. He is widely regarded as the greatest Polish composer, and one of the most influential composers for piano in the 19th century.

    Chopin was a genius of universal appeal. His music conquers the most diverse audiences. When the first notes of Chopin sound through the concert hall there is a happy sigh of recognition. All over the world men and women know his music. They love it. They are moved by it. Yet it is not Romantic music in the Byronic sense. It does not tell stories or paint pictures. It is expressive and personal, but still a pure art. Even in this abstract atomic age, where emotion is not fashionable, Chopin endures. His music is the universal language of human communication. When I play Chopin I know I speak directly to the hearts of people!

    Chopin's music for the piano combined a unique rhythmic sense (particularly his use of rubato), frequent use of chromaticism, and counterpoint. This mixture produces a particularly fragile sound in the melody and the harmony, which are nonetheless underpinned by solid and interesting harmonic techniques. He took the new salon genre of the nocturne, invented by Irish composer John Field, to a deeper level of sophistication. Three of his twenty-one nocturnes were only published after his death in 1849, contrary to his wishes.He also endowed popular dance forms, such as the Polish mazurka and the waltz, Viennese Waltz, with a greater range of melody and expression. Chopin was the first to write ballades and scherzi as individual pieces. Chopin also took the example of Bach's preludes and fugues, transforming the genre in his own preludes.

    Chopin was born in the village of Żelazowa Wola, in the Duchy of Warsaw, to a Polish mother and French-expatriate father and came to be regarded as a child-prodigy pianist. In November 1830, at the age of twenty, Chopin went abroad. After the suppression of the Polish 1830--31 Uprising, he became one of the many expatriates of the Polish Great Emigration. In Paris he made a comfortable living as composer and piano teacher, while giving few public performances. A great Polish patriot, in France he used the French version of his given name and, to avoid having to rely on Imperial Russian documents, eventually became a French citizen.After some ill-fated romantic involvements with Polish ladies, from 1837 to 1847 he conducted a turbulent relationship with the French writer George Sand (Aurore Dudevant). Always in frail health, at 39 in Paris he succumbed to pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Chopin's extant compositions all include the piano, predominantly alone or as a solo instrument among others. Though his music is technically demanding, its style emphasizes nuance and expressive depth rather than technical virtuosity. Chopin invented new musical forms such as the ballade,and made major innovations to existing forms such as the piano sonata, waltz, nocturne, étude, impromptu, and prelude. His works are mainstays of Romanticism in 19th-century classical music. His mazurkas and polonaises remain the cornerstone of Polish national classical music.
    [from Wikipedia]

  • Milosz Magin - 6 Miniatures polonaises

    6:39

    Milosz Magin (6 July 1929 – 4 March 1999) was a Polish composer and pianist.

    Born in Lódz, Poland, Milosz Magin showed considerable musical abilities from early childhood. He was a student of piano with Margerita Trombini-Kazuro and composition with both Kazimierz Sikorski and Jan Maklakiewicz; the latter he considered his spiritual father. Magin also studied violin, cello and ballet. In 1957, he completed his piano, compositional and conducting studies, graduating the Warsaw Higher School of Music with distinction. Milosz Magin won prizes in several top international competitions: the International Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, the Marguerite Long-Jacques Thibaud Competition in Paris and the Vianna da Motta Competition in Lisbon. He left his native country together with his wife Idalia Magin and stayed in Portugal, Germany, and England until finally settling in Paris in 1960.

    Magin's career as an international soloist was suddenly interrupted in 1963 after his left wrist was broken in a car accident. However, with a remarkable courage he eventually regained his playing abilities, and in 1968 started recording the complete works of Chopin for Decca, which is now regarded as a reference recording (complete reissue on CD was made by Universal in 2000). During his years of recovery Magin went back to composition, which became one of his main priorities for the rest of his life. Prodigious piano virtuoso, he regularly gave concerts in different countries around the world, mainly performing works by Chopin, his favorite composer, but also works by Mozart and various Polish, French and Russian composers, as well as his own music. In parallel to his career as a pianist and composer, Milosz Magin became a popular teacher with students who came to him from all over the world, including such famous performers as Jean-Marc Luisada. According to his students, Magin was an exceptional master, not only sharing his knowledge but having the gift to inspire and tactfully advise while demanding high standards of his students.

    He left a considerable body of music: piano works, including four sonatas and collections for young pianists, several concertos (four for piano, two for violin, one of each for cello and clarinet), two symphonies, and a ballet, as well as vocal and orchestral works. Not attached to any particular musical style, Milosz Magin’s music is notable for its balance between melody, harmony and rhythmic play. He was often inspired by the rhythms of his native Poland. Appreciated by the public, his works are now recorded and published as well as featured in the repertory of great performers.

    With the help of his wife Idalia, also a pianist, in 1985 Magin founded the Milosz Magin International Piano Competition in Paris. Devoted to the discovery of young international talents and to the promotion of Polish music, this competition takes place every two years with increasing popularity.

    Magin died on 4 March 1999 of a heart attack while touring with concerts in Tahiti. He was buried next to Chopin’s tomb at the Père-Lachaise cemetery in Paris, France.

    (Wikipedia)

    Please take note that the audio AND sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to a minimum fo 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio: naxosmusiclibrary.com
    (Performance by: Masako Ezaki)
    Original sheet music:

  • 4 PRODUCERS FLIP THE SAME SAMPLE feat. Virtual Riot, Bad Snacks, Sarah the Illstrumentalist

    17:24

    I'm calling this one the woo episode ????
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  • 14 Beautiful Female Classical Pianists

    7:46

    Links to the videos I used:
    14. Lola Astanova:
    13. Khatia Buniatishvili:
    12. Dora Deliyska:
    11. Hélène Grimaud:
    10. Anastasia Huppmann:
    9. Olga Jegunova:
    8. Eloïse Bella Kohn:
    7. Irina Lankova:
    6. Valentina Lisitsa:
    5. Olga Scheps:
    4. Primavera Shima:
    3. Belle Suwanpotipra:
    2. Katharina Treutler:
    1. Yuja Wang:

    **No copyright infringement intended**
    **This video is purely for entertainment purpose**
    **I don't monetize my videos**

  • Chopin: Polonaises

    1:17:01

    The Polonaise was a peasant dance from Poland that gained popularity in the early 18th century among composers and high society. Bach and Handel both wrote movements marked ‘Polonaise’, and in the early 19th century examples can be found in the finales of Beethoven’s Triple Concerto, and Field’s Third Piano Concerto. Chopin grew up with polonaise and other forms of traditional Polish music. His teacher, Elsner was a Polonaise composer, and the business of writing and publishing sets of polonaises was a lucrative one.

    There was another reason why such a traditional was so popular in Poland at this time; the country had once again been robbed of its independence, and the nationalistic pulling power of such music helped keep the national identity and spirit alive. Chopin’s genius took the simple tunes of the Polonaise and allowed him to create large-scale complex and dramatic works with myriad emotions. In many ways they captured the Polish spirit which remained defiantly unbroken.

    Folke Nauta was born in 1973 and has won many prizes in key competitions around Europe.

    Composer: Frédéric Chopin
    Artist: Folke Nauta (piano)

    Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play):
    More Information:
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    00:00:00 Polonaises: Andante spianato et Grande Polonaise brillante Op.22 in E flat
    00:14:15 Polonaises: Polonaise Op.26 No.1 in C sharp Minor
    00:22:45 Polonaises: Polonaise Op.26 No.2 in E flat Minor
    00:31:57 Polonaises: Polonaise Op.40 No.1 in A ‘Military’
    00:37:31 Polonaises: Polonaise Op.40 No.2 in C Minor
    00:46:01 Polonaises: Polonaise Op.44 in F sharp Minor
    00:56:55 Polonaises: Polonaise Op.53 in A flat ‘Heroic’
    01:03:55 Polonaises: Polonaise-Fantaisie Op.61 in A flat

    #chopin #classicalmusic #Classical #chopinpolonaises

  • 20 Names of classical composers with correct pronunciation

    1:48

    I am not native nor expert on any of the languages of this video, so don´t take this video as infallible. But I think it should be more accurate than those videos about some random guy trying to teach us how to pronounce these names.

    And also, sorry for the bad quality on some of the audios, specially on russian names: it is the raw archive from google translator so blame google instead of me -_-

  • Gorécki - Symphonie No.3 - 2nd Movement

    9:23

    Henryk Gorécki (1933) is a polish composer of contemporary classical music. Górecki's most popular piece is his Third Symphony, also known as the Symphony of Sorrowful Songs. The work is slow and contemplative, and each of the three movements are composed for orchestra and solo soprano. The libretto for the first movement is taken from a 15th century lament, while second movement uses the words of a teenage girl, Helena Błażusiak, which she wrote on the wall of a Gestapo prison cell in Zakopane to invoke the protection of the Virgin Mary. The third uses the text of a Silesian folk song which describes the pain of a mother searching for a son killed in the Silesian uprisings. The dominant themes of the symphony are motherhood and separation through war. While the first and third movements are written from the perspective of a parent who has lost a child, the second movement is from that of a child separated from a parent.

    The first paintings are from El Greco (1541-1614) - a painter, sculptor, and architect of the Spanish Renaissance. El Greco's dramatic and expressionistic style was met with puzzlement by his contemporaries but found appreciation in the 20th century. El Greco is regarded as a precursor of both Expressionism and Cubism, while his personality and works were a source of inspiration for poets and writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke and Nikos Kazantzakis. El Greco has been characterized by modern scholars as an artist so individual that he belongs to no conventional school. He is best known for tortuously elongated figures and often fantastic or phantasmagorical pigmentation, marrying Byzantine traditions with those of Western painting.

    The second paintings are from the austrian painter Egon Schiele (1890-1918). A protégé of Gustav Klimt, Schiele was a major figurative painter of the early 20th century. Schiele's work is noted for its intensity, and the many self-portraits the artist produced. The twisted body shapes and the expressive line that characterize Schiele's paintings and drawings mark the artist as an early exponent of Expressionism, although still strongly associated with the art nouveau movement (Jugendstil).

  • UCF Performs - Music of Great Polish Composers

    39:27

    The UCF Symphony Orchestra presents the music of Great Polish Composers including Ayako Yonetani and Laurent Boukobza. (2006) Part 1

  • Maria Szymanowska

    6:16

    NIFC w cyklu „Portrety Kompozytorów Polskich” przedstawia życie i twórczość wybitnych artystów XIX wieku.

    Maria Szymanowska (1789–1831)

    Pierwsza europejska pianistka zawodowa. Przebojowa, piękna, niezależna. Wielbiona za życia, po śmierci nagle popada w zapomnienie.

    Opowiada Lesław Żurek.
    W roli Marii Szymanowskiej znakomita polska pianistka Maria Gabryś-Heyke.

    reżyseria – Marta Minorowicz
    scenariusz – Marta Bacewicz
    zdjęcia – Bartosz Świniarski
    dźwięk – Marcin Popławski
    montaż – Tomasz Chłopek

    producent wykonawczy: Urszula Bielicka
    producent: Artur Szklener
    produkcja: NARODOWY INSTYTUT FRYDERYKA CHOPINA

    Materiał zrealizowano w Domu Pracy Twórczej w Radziejowicach.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NIFC presents “Portraits of Polish Composers” a series about the life and work of outstanding polish artists.

    Maria Szymanowska (1789–1831)

    The first professional female pianist in Europe – beautiful, feisty and independent. Admired while alive, after her death, she all of a sudden fell into oblivion.

    Narrator – Lesław Żurek.
    In the role of Maria Szymanowska – excellent polish pianist Maria Gabryś-Heyke.

    director – Marta Minorowicz
    screenplay – Marta Bacewicz
    DOP – Bartosz Świniarski
    sound – Marcin Popławski
    editing – Tomasz Chłopek

    executive producer: Urszula Bielicka
    produced by: Artur Szklener
    production: THE FRYDERYK CHOPIN INSTITIUTE

    The series has been filmed at the Centre for Creative Work in Radziejowice.

  • Ignacy Jan Paderewski

    5:11

    NIFC w cyklu „Portrety Kompozytorów Polskich” przedstawia życie i twórczość wybitnych artystów XIX wieku.

    Ignacy Jan Paderewski (1860–1941)

    Pianista i kompozytor. Międzynarodowa gwiazda swojego pokolenia. Premier i filantrop. Bezgranicznie oddany swojej ojczyźnie. Człowiek, który kilkukrotnie zmienił bieg polskiej historii.

    Opowiada Lesław Żurek.
    W roli Ignacego Jana Paderewskiego – znakomity polski pianista Marek Bracha.

    reżyseria – Marta Minorowicz
    scenariusz – Marta Bacewicz
    zdjęcia – Bartosz Świniarski
    dźwięk – Marcin Popławski
    montaż – Tomasz Chłopek

    producent wykonawczy: Urszula Bielicka
    producent: Artur Szklener
    produkcja: NARODOWY INSTYTUT FRYDERYKA CHOPINA

    Materiał zrealizowano w Domu Pracy Twórczej w Radziejowicach.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    NIFC presents “Portraits of Polish Composers a series about the life and work of outstanding polish artists.

    Ignacy Jan Paderewski (1860–1941)

    He was a pianist and composer; an international star of his generation. He was a Prime Minister and philanthropist; he was deeply dedicated to his homeland; several times Paderewski changed the course of Polish history.

    Narrator – Lesław Żurek.
    In the role of Ignacy Jan Paderewski – excellent polish pianist Marek Bracha.

    director – Marta Minorowicz
    screenplay – Marta Bacewicz
    DOP – Bartosz Świniarski
    sound – Marcin Popławski
    editing – Tomasz Chłopek

    executive producer: Urszula Bielicka
    produced by: Artur Szklener
    production: THE FRYDERYK CHOPIN INSTITUTE

    The series has been filmed at the Centre for Creative Work in Radziejowice.

  • x
  • 13 GREAT COMPOSERS AND HOW IT FEELS PLAYING THEIR MUSIC

    4:46

    Orchestral Life. Feels Good.

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  • UCF Performs - Music of Great Polish Composers

    47:10

    The UCF Symphony Orchestra presents the music of Great Polish Composers including Ayako Yonetani and Laurent Boukobza. (2006) Part 2

  • Mieczyslaw Weinberg, Symphony No 1 in G Minor, Op 10

    39:37

    Mieczyslaw Weinberg, Symphony No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 10
    Dedicated to the Red Army

    1. Allegro moderato - Doppio piu lento - Larghetto - Doppio movimento (Tempo I) - Larghetto - Tempo I
    2. Lento
    3. Vivace - Allegretto grazioso - Tempo I
    4. Allegro con fuoco

    Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra
    Thord Svedlund, conductor

    Mieczysław Weinberg (also Moisey or Moishe Vainberg, Moisey Samuilovich Vaynberg; Russian: Моисей Самуилович Вайнберг; Polish: Mojsze [Mieczysław] Wajnberg; 8 December 1919 – 26 February 1996) was a Polish composer of Polish-Jewish origin. From 1939 he lived in the Soviet Union and Russia and lost most of his family in the Holocaust.

    He left a large body of work that included twenty-two symphonies and seventeen string quartets.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Zygmunt Mycielski, Symphony 1, Polish

    29:07

    Zygmunt Mycielski, Symphony 1, Polish (1951)

    1. Ballada
    2. Scherzo
    3. Elegia
    4. Rondo – Finale

    Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Robert Hollingworth, conductor

    Zygmunt Mycielski was composer, writer, music activist. Born 17 August 1907 in Przeworsk, died 5 August 1987 in Warsaw.
    He completed his Secondary School studies in Kraków and that is also where he was taught music by Father Bernardino Rizzi, an Italian composer, organist and choirmaster. Since 1928, following Karol Szymanowski’s advice, he continued his musical education in the École Normale de Musique in Paris with Paul Dukas and Nadia Boulanger. He was active in the Association of Young Polish Musicians in Paris, and between 1934-36, he was President of this Association. He returned to Poland in 1936 and became involved in composing, publishing in music journals and working as a music critic.

    Mycielski took part in the Second World War, at first during the September Campaign and then in 1940 fighting in France. As a soldier of the Polish Army, he became a prisoner-of-war. Later he was sent as forced labour to a German farm. He returned to Poland after the end of the war.

    Between 1946-48 and 1957-59, he was the co-editor of the Ruch Muzyczny (Music Motion) Journal, in 1960-68 – he was the chief editor of this magazine. He was co-editor of Res Facta, Rocznik Chopinowski (Chopin Yearly) and Chopin Studies. In 1955 he wrote an article in the Przegląd Kulturalny (Culture Review), criticising the isolation of Polish culture from the work of composers around the world. Following the intervention of the Warsaw Pact armies in Czechoslovakia, he published in the Paris Kultura An Open Letter to Czech and Slovak musicians, for which he was persecuted by the communist authorities of the Polish People’s Republic: he was removed from the post of chief editor of Ruch Muzyczny and was subject to strict personal censorship as well as forbidden to leave the country. In 1974, he signed the letter of the 15 intellectuals and artists to the communist authorities of the Polish People’s Republic demanding that Poles living in the USSR be granted access to Polish culture and their own independent education. In 1975, he signed a memorial letter by 59 intellectuals to the authorities regarding the plans for amending the constitution. In 1978, he participated in founding the illegal Academic Education Society – active in student circles.

    Between 1947-48 and 1952-54, Zygmunt Mycielski was Vice-President, and between 1948-49 – he was President of the Main Board of the Polish Composers’ Union, between 1985-87 – member of the presidium, and in the years 1954-57 and 1960-83, he was one of the members of its Qualifications Committee. As from 1983, he was an honorary member of the Polish Composers’ Union.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Old Polish Tango 1931: M. Fogg: Youre Not The First

    3:12

    Mieczysław Fogg & Ork. A. Golda i J. Petersburskiego – Ty nie jesteś pierwsza [You’re Not The First] Tango z filmu „Jej ekscelencja Miłość” [from he Film Her Majesty Love] (Jurmann – Jerry), Odeon 1931 (Polish)

    NOTE: This song is a Polish version of a popular German tango “Du bist nicht die Erste” [You’re Not The First] which was sung in the highly popular German music comedy from 1931 “Ihre Majestät die Liebe” (Her Majesty Love). It was performed in a film by German actor Francis Lederer; in this recording we can hear a popular Polish crooner Mieczysław Fogg accompanied by orchestra directed by two most popular Polish composers and bandleades: violinist Artur Gold & pianist Jerzy Petersburski. The recording was made at Odeon by Mieczysław Fogg who is singing solo – although in that time he was still a member of immensely popular Polish revelers Chór Dana. However, he was also preparing his own vocal career, the group leader Władysław Dan accepted it and in a couple of years Mieczysław Fogg became one of the brightest stars in history of Polish song. Unfortunately, those early Fogg’s recordings at Odeon do not impress us with quality of the sound: they lack dynamics and localisation of the microphones leaves much to be desired. It is possible that at the end of Chór Dana’s session, when Fogg was about to begin his own recording, the microphones were still set appropriately for a group, not a solo singer. Even so, the Fogg's interpretation is as always delightful.

  • Wojciech Kilar, Requiem pour le Père Kolbe

    14:17

    Wojciech Kilar, Requiem pour le Père Kolbe

    Orchestre Philharmonique National de Pologne
    Kazimierz Kord, conductor

    Wojciech Kilar, Polish composer (born July 17, 1932, Lwow, Pol. [now Lviv, Ukr.]—died Dec. 29, 2013, Katowice, Pol.), wrote the music for more than 130 motion pictures, most notably the haunting, atmospheric scores that enhanced Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula (1992), Jane Campion’s The Portrait of a Lady (1996), and three films directed by Roman Polanski—Death and the Maiden (1994), The Ninth Gate (1999), and The Pianist (2002).

    Kilar’s score for the latter film was nominated for best music by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts award and won the César Award in France. He also worked with such Polish directors as Krzysztof Kieslowski, Andrzej Wajda, and Krzysztof Zanussi.

    Kilar graduated from the State Music Academy in Katowice in 1955, the same year that he composed his first orchestral work, Symphony No. 1 for Strings. He received a grant to study (1959–60) with Nadia Boulanger in Paris but returned to Poland. Throughout his career Kilar moved easily between composing for the cinema and for the concert hall; his work in both genres reflects his interest in Roman Catholicism and traditional Polish folk tunes, as well as the influence of such composers as Maurice Ravel and Arnold Schoenberg.

    Kilar’s best-known classical piece, the symphonic poem Krzesany (1974), was inspired by the people and music of the Tatra Mountains along the Poland-Slovakia border. Kilar received many international awards, and in 2012 he was presented with the Order of the White Eagle (Poland’s highest honour) for his contributions to Polish culture.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Polish Swing 1938: Henryk Wars Orch. & Mieczysław Fogg - Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen

    2:43

    Mieczysław Fogg & Orkiestra Henryka Warsa – Czy wiesz, mała Miss? (Do You Know, Little Miss?) [org.. title: Bei Mir bist Du Schoen] Fokstrot (Secunda – Friedwald), Syrena-Electro 1938 (Polish)

    NOTE: This record, quite seriously scratched during the first 15’’ (I did my best to revive the beginning and make it audible) is however a valuable and rare example of recording of Polish swing in the late 1930s. Henryk Wars – the excellent pianist & mogul of prewar Polish composers of the film- and revue music - leads the orchestra which makes on this side a really successful swing-version of the world-hit “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen”. In prewar Poland, the traditional tastes of the most of the record buyers made the producers rely rather on the tangos and sentimental cabaret ballads than the hot Anglo-Saxon rhythms. Younger generation of the jazz musicians in Poland – such as later world-famous trumpeter Adolf Rosner, Franciszek Związek, Łopatowski Brothers and the whole bunch of others complained in their memoirs, that prewar studios of the most influential record companies (Syrena Records, Odeon) were virtually closed before them. The powerful trio in the record market in Poland, that is: Henryk Wars, Henryk Gold and Jerzy Gert (the third being the music director in Polish branch of Odeon) would not allow the new trends in dance music prevail over the “Polish tango” monopoly. Interestingly: being formally against the jazz-influences in record industry during the 1930s, privately all of them were jazz fans, who in the 1920s led the first jazz/dance bands in Poland. Well, the pass of time changes our tastes, indeed.

  • Witold Lutosławski, Symphony No 1

    24:46

    Witold Lutosławski, Symphony No. 1

    1. Allegro giusto
    2. Poco adagio
    3. Allegretto
    4. Allegro vivace

    Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Hannu Lintu, conductor

    Witold Roman Lutosławski (25 January 1913 – 7 February 1994) was a Polish composer and orchestral conductor. He was one of the major European composers of the 20th century, and one of the preeminent Polish musicians during his last three decades. He earned many international awards and prizes. His compositions (of which he was a notable conductor) include four symphonies, a Concerto for Orchestra, a string quartet, instrumental works, concertos, and orchestral song cycles.

    During his youth, Lutosławski studied piano and composition in Warsaw. His early works were influenced by Polish folk music. His style demonstrates a wide range of rich atmospheric textures. He began developing his own characteristic composition techniques in the late 1950s. His music from this period onwards incorporates his own methods of building harmonies from small groups of musical intervals. It also uses aleatoric processes, in which the rhythmic coordination of parts is subject to an element of chance.

    During World War II, after escaping German capture, Lutosławski made a living by playing the piano in Warsaw bars. After the war, Stalinist authorities banned his First Symphony for being formalist—allegedly accessible only to an elite. Lutosławski believed such anti-formalism was an unjustified retrograde step, and he resolutely strove to maintain his artistic integrity. In the 1980s, Lutosławski gave artistic support to the Solidarity movement. Near the end of his life, he was awarded the Order of the White Eagle, Poland's highest honour.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Polska muzyka barokowa Jarzębski Chromatica Polish baroque music dawna Warszawa Canaletto

    3:57

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (playlista) (Early Polish Music)

    Dawna Warszawa na obrazach Canaletta
    (Paintings of early Warsaw by Canaletto (Bernardo Bellotto)):
    1-3 Widok Warszawy z tarasu Zamku Królewskiego
    4-6 Ulica Senatorska z kościołem Reformatów
    7-9 - Wilanów

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders' Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)


    Polska muzyka renesansowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Mikołaj Gomółka
    Wacław z Szamotuł
    Mikołaj z Krakowa
    Marcin Leopolita
    Wojciech Długoraj
    Jakub Polak

    Polska muzyka barokowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Bartłomiej Pękiel
    Mikołaj Zieleński
    Marcin Mielczewski
    Adam Jarzębski
    Grzegorz Gerwazy Gorczycki
    Sylwester Szarzyński
    Andrzej Rohaczewski

  • Renaissance Lute Music in Poland Diomedes Cato Favorito Muzyka renesansowa w polsce

    2:39

    Zdjęcie (Photo):
    Wawel , Sala pod Zodiakiem (Cracow, Royal Castle)
    Lutnista i kompozytor. Urodził się ok. 1560 prawdopodobnie w Serravalle koło Treviso, zmarł po 1607 lub po 1618.
    Jego ojciec - Constantino z Mediolanu był ok. 1562 nauczycielem w Serravalle. Ok. 1565, szykanowany i podejrzewany o herezję przez wenecką inkwizycję, uciekł z Włoch i schronił się w Krakowie. W niedługim czasie przybyła tu również jego żona z trojgiem dzieci (najmłodszym był Diomedes), stąd kompozytor od dzieciństwa wychowywał się w Polsce. W latach 1588-93 oraz w 1603 był nadwornym lutnistą Zygmunta III Wazy, a w lecie 1593 towarzyszył królowi w podróży przez Gdańsk do Szwecji. Związek Cato z dworem Stanisława Kostki, podskarbiego ziem pruskich jest wątpliwy. Dalsze jego losy nie są znane. (culture.pl)

    Diomedes Cato (1560 to 1565 – after 1618) was an Italian-born composer and lute player, who lived and worked entirely in Poland. He is known mainly for his instrumental music. He mixed the style of the late Renaissance with the emerging Baroque, and also Italian idioms with Polish folk material; and in addition he was one of the first native-born Italian composers to visit Sweden.
    He was born near Treviso between 1560 and 1565, possibly at Serravale where his father is documented as being a teacher. Around 1565 his family, who were Protestants, fled Italy to escape the Inquisition, and settled in Poland. Cato, who had left Italy before the age of five, received all of his musical education in Kraków, where the family settled. The first record of his employment dates from 1588, when he was hired as a lutenist by the court of King Sigismund III Vasa, a position he kept until 1593. In 1591 he wrote music for the wedding of Jan Kostka at Świecie castle; the Kostka family may have been patrons of his, since Stanisław Kostka[disambiguation needed] left him a considerable legacy in 1602.

    In 1593 and 1594 he went with King Sigismund to Sweden, where his fame as a lutenist and composer was evidently large; as late as 1600 he was still the most famous composer of Italian origin known in Sweden. Some of his music, including a few Polish dances, survives from sources only in Sweden. The last tentative record of his life is from 1619, when there is a single unconfirmed reference to him playing the lute during that year.
    Cato wrote both vocal and instrumental music, and both sacred and secular: however he was most famous for his works for lute. The lute works include dozens of pieces in many forms and styles, including choreae polonicae, fantasias, galliards, transcriptions of Italian madrigals, passamezzos, and preludes, all of which he probably played himself. (wikipedia)

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders’ Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)

  • Mieczysław Weinberg, Flute Concerto in D minor, op 75

    14:04

    Mieczysław Weinberg, Flute Concerto in D minor, op. 75

    1. Allegro
    2. Largo – Allegro comodo

    Alexander Korneyev, flute
    Moscow Chamber Orchestra
    Rudolf Barshai, conductor

    Mieczysław Weinberg (also Moisey or Moishe Vainberg, Moisey Samuilovich Vaynberg; Russian: Моисей Самуилович Вайнберг; Polish: Mojsze [Mieczysław] Wajnberg; 8 December 1919 – 26 February 1996) was a Polish composer of Polish-Jewish origin. From 1939 he lived in the Soviet Union and Russia and lost most of his family in the Holocaust.

    He left a large body of work that included twenty-two symphonies and seventeen string quartets.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Zygmunt Stojowski, Symphony in D minor, Op 21

    37:58

    Zygmunt Stojowski, Symphony in D-minor, Op.21 (1897)

    1. Andante mesto - Allegro moderato
    2. Andante
    3. Scherzo: Molto vivace
    4. Finale, Allegro con fuoco ma non vivace

    Polish Radio Orchestra
    Łukasz Borowicz, conductor

    Zygmunt Denis Antoni Jordan de Stojowski (May 4, 1870 – November 5, 1946) was a Polish pianist and composer.
    He was born on May 4, 1870 near the city of Kielce. Stojowski began his musical training with his mother, and with Polish composer Władysław Żeleński. In Kraków, as a seventeen-year-old student, he made his debut as a concert pianist performing Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 3 with the local orchestra.

    At the age of eighteen he moved to Paris and studied piano with Louis Diémer and composition with Léo Delibes. Two years later at the Paris Conservatoire, he would win first prizes in piano performance, counterpoint and fugue. According to Stojowski, however, in a December 1901 interview that appeared in a Warsaw magazine, the teachers who had the most profound influence on him as a musician were the Polish violinist-composer Wladyslaw Gorski and pianist-composer Ignacy Jan Paderewski.

    Stojowski's music was found worthy enough to be included in the first concert of the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra, on 5 November 1901. His Symphony in D minor, Op. 21, which was featured in that first concert conducted by Emil Młynarski, had won first prize (1000 rubles) in a Paderewski Music Competition in Leipzig on 9 July 1898. Besides having his symphony performed at that first prestigious concert, Stojowski appeared as a recitalist in December and again as the soloist in Saint-Saëns' Piano Concerto No. 4 in January 1902.

    In October 1905, Stojowski sailed on the SS Moltke to the USA on the invitation of Frank Damrosch, founder and director of the newly formed Institute of Musical Art, to head the institute's piano department; he was recommended for the position by pianist Harold Bauer and cellist Pablo Casals. New York became his home for the rest of his life.

    The institute would later merge in 1924 with the Juilliard Graduate School to form the Juilliard School, where Stojowski would also teach during the summers of 1932 and 1940-46. In New York, he was acclaimed as a great composer, pianist and pedagogue, and had the distinction of being the first Polish composer to have an entire concert devoted to his music performed by the New York Philharmonic.

    After six years of teaching at the Institute of Musical Art, Stojowski then headed the piano department at the Von Ende School of Music until 1917. Finally, due to the large number of students who wished to work with him, he opened his own 'Stojowski Studios' at his four-story brownstone home at 150 West 76th Street in Manhattan. Among Stojowski's pupils were Mischa Levitzki, Alfred Newman, Antonia Brico, Arthur Loesser, and Oscar Levant.

    Here, together with his Peruvian-born wife, Luisa Morales-Macedo, the pianist/composer not only taught until the end of the 1930s, but also raised what he called his three best compositions: his sons, Alfred (1919), Henry (1921) and Ignace (1923–1984).
    He died on November 5, 1946 in New York City.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • The Best of Chopin

    2:8:18

    A beautiful collection of 20 piano works by Polish composer Frédéric Chopin. Chopin was a piano virtuoso of the Romantic era. He is considered as the biggest composer born in Poland and is worldwide renown as one of the greatest composers from music history. All of Chopin’s compositions include the piano, amongst are his beautiful nocturnes and etudes.

    Spotify link:

    If you enjoyed this playlist and would love to see more then remember to like this video. Also subscribe and tell us in the comments what you thought of this collection and what kind of playlist you’d like to hear next.

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    Spotify Playlists:
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    Peaceful and Relaxing Piano Music:
    The Best of Rachmaninoff:
    The Best of Liszt:

    Track list:
    00:00:00 Mazurkas, Op. 59: II. Allegretto in A-Flat Major played by Georgijs Osokins
    00:02:40 Waltz, Op. 34: I. Vivace in A-Flat Major played by Sergio Fiorentino
    00:07:20 Bolero in A Minor, Op. 19 played by Frank van de Laar
    00:15:25 Études, Op. 10: XII. Etude in C Minor “Revolutionary”. Allegro con fuoco played by Zlata Chochieva
    00:18:00 Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 23 played by Hubert Rutkowski
    00:27:06 Polonaise in B-Flat Minor, B. 13, KKIVa played by Sergio Fiorentino
    00:31:15 Nocturnes, Op. 9: II. Andante in E-Flat Major played by Yuan Sheng
    00:35:50 Berceuse in D-Flat Major, Op. 57 played by Georgijs Osokins
    00:40:20 Waltz in A-Flat Major, Op. 42 played by Sergio Fiorentino
    00:44:07 Piano Sonata No. 2 in B-Flat Minor, Op. 35: III. Marche funèbre. Lento played by Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy
    00:53:31 Nocturnes, Op. 9: I. Larghetto in B-Flat Minor played by Yuan Sheng
    00:59:00 Waltz, Op. 64: II. Waltz in C-Sharp Minor played by Sergio Fiorentino
    01:02:06 Grande valse brillante in E-Flat Major, Op. 18 played by Alessandro Deljavan
    01:08:30 Preludes, Op. 28: I. Prelude in D-Flat Major “Raindrop”. Sostenuto played by Wolfram Schmitt-Leonardy
    01:14:14 Polonaise in A-Flat Major, Op. 53 “Heroic” played by Sergio Fiorentino
    01:21:01 Études, Op. 10: III.Etude in E Major “Tristesse. Lento ma non troppo played by Zlata Chochieva
    01:24:57 Polonaise in F-Sharp Minor, Op. 44 played by Sergio Fiorentino
    01:35:09 Fantaisie in F Minor, Op. 49 played by Alwin Bär
    01:48:19 Barcarolle in F-Sharp Major, Op. 60 played by Georgijs Osokins
    01:58:10 Scherzo No. 4 in E Major, Op. 54 played by Sergio Fiorentino

    #Piano #Classical #Music #Best #Chopin

  • Romuald Twardowski, Piano Concerto No 1

    19:57

    Romuald Twardowski, Piano Concerto No. 1 (1956)

    1. Maestoso. Allegro marcato
    2. Andante
    3. Allegro marcato
    4. Andante
    5. Allegro marcato
    6. Maestoso. Vivace

    Joanna Lawrynowicz. Piano
    The Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic Orchestra in Byalistok
    Wojciech Rajski, conductor

    Romuald Twardowski (born 17 June 1930 in Wilno (Vilnius) is a Polish composer.
    During years of occupation or World War II, he studied violin playing and after the war piano and organ. In the years 1946-1950, he used to be organist in Vilnius churches. In 1952-1957, he studied composition in the conservatory of Vilnius. Later moves to Warsaw and continuous studies at Warsaw Academy of Music in years 1957-60 in Bolesław Woytowicz class. In the years 1963 and 1966 he studied Gregorian chant and medieval polyphony in Nadia Boulanger class in Paris. Since 1971 Romuald Twardowski has been the Professor of Fryderyk Chopin University of Music.

    The 1960s and 1970s were for the composer the most fruitful period.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Maria Szymanowska Prelude in E major Regina Smendzianka Polish Romantic Piano Music

    1:40

    Score (4 Preludes, page 156):

    Szymanowska Lessel Ogiński Smendzianka (playlist):

    Maria Szymanowska (1789-1831) - polish pianist and composer

    Regina Smendzianka - piano

    Nagr. Rec. 1966

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders' Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)

  • Mieczyslaw Karlowicz, Symphony in E minor, Op 7 Rebirth Symphony

    42:19

    Mieczyslaw Karlowicz, Symphony in E-minor, Op. 7 Rebirth Symphony (1902)

    1. Andante - Allegro - Meno mosso - Tempo I
    2. Andante Non troppo
    3. Vivace - Molto meno mosso - Tempo I
    4.Allegro maestoso - Allegro ben moderato - Allegro vivo

    Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Lukasz Borowicz, conductor

    Mieczyslaw Karlowicz, Symphony in E-minor, Op. 7 Rebirth Symphony (1902)

    1. Andante - Allegro - Meno mosso - Tempo I
    2. Andante Non troppo
    3. Vivace - Molto meno mosso - Tempo I
    4.Allegro maestoso - Allegro ben moderato - Allegro vivo

    Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Lukasz Borowicz, conductor

    Mieczysław Karłowicz (11 December 1876 – 8 February 1909) was a Polish composer and conductor.
    Mieczysław Karłowicz was born in Vishneva (now in Belarus) into a noble family belonging to Clan Ostoja. His father Jan was a Polish linguist, lexicographer, and musician. As a child, Karłowicz studied violin, for which he later composed his only concerto.

    Karłowicz studied in Warsaw with Zygmunt Noskowski, Stanisław Barcewicz, Piotr Maszyński, and Gustaw Roguski. He later studied in Berlin with Heinrich Urban, to whom he dedicated his Serenade for Strings, which he composed and performed while Urban's student. From 1906 to 1907 he studied conducting with Arthur Nikisch.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Alexandre Tansman, Divertimento for Chamber Orchestra

    12:28

    Alexandre Tansman, Divertimento for Chamber Orchestra

    1. Allegro con spirit
    2. Adagio
    3. Vivace

    Virtuoso di Praga
    Israel Yinon, conductor

    Alexandre Tansman (Polish: Aleksander Tansman; 12 June 1897 – 15 November 1986) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of Jewish origin. He spent his early years in his native Poland, but lived in France for most of his life, being granted French citizenship in 1938. His Polish identity influenced several orchestral and chamber works, such as Rapsodie polonaise and Quatre Danses polonaises, and some guitar works, such as Hommage à Lech Walesa and Hommage à Chopin. His music is often said to be primarily neoclassical, drawing on his Polish Jewish heritage as well as his French musical influences.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • The most famous composers. 39: Chopin

    9:12

    Frédéric François Chopin (1 March or 22 February 1810 -- 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist. He is widely considered one of the greatest Romantic composers. Chopin was born in Żelazowa Wola, a village in the then Duchy of Warsaw. A renowned child-prodigy pianist and composer, he grew up in Warsaw and completed his music education there; he composed many mature works in Warsaw before leaving Poland in 1830 at age 20, shortly before the November 1830 Uprising.
    Following the Russian suppression of the Uprising, he settled in Paris as part of Poland's Great Emigration. During the remaining 19 years of his life, Chopin gave only some 30 public performances, preferring the more intimate atmosphere of the salon; he supported himself by sales of his compositions and as a piano teacher. After some romantic dalliances with Polish women, including an abortive engagement, from 1837 to 1847 he carried on a relationship with the French writer Amantine Dupin. For most of his life, Chopin suffered from poor health; he died in Paris in 1849 at age 39.
    The vast majority of Chopin's works are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces and some songs to Polish texts. His piano works are often technically demanding, with an emphasis on nuance and expressive depth. Chopin invented the instrumental ballade and made major innovations to the piano sonata, mazurka, waltz, nocturne, polonaise, étude, impromptu, scherzo and prélude.

    Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin (Szopen) (en francés, Frédéric François Chopin, Żelazowa Wola, Polonia, 22 de febrero o 1 de marzo de 1810 — París, 17 de octubre de 1849) fue un compositor y virtuoso pianista polaco considerado como uno de los más importantes de la historia. Su perfecta técnica, su refinamiento estilístico y su elaboración armónica han sido comparadas históricamente con las de Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Liszt y Ludwig van Beethoven por su perdurable influencia en la música de tiempos posteriores. La obra de Chopin representa el Romanticismo musical en su estado más puro

  • BBC Proms 2013 -- Witold Lutosławski, Variations on a Theme by Paganini.

    8:13

    -- First Night of the Proms 2013 -- POLISH MUSIC! Pierwszy wieczór: ŚWIĘTOWANIE POLSKIEJ MUZYKI!: Witold Lutosławski i JEGO doskonałe (szczególnie: 4:37!) Wariacje na temat Paganiniego. BBC Proms 2013 / 12 VII / --
    Stephen Hough (piano) Sakari Oramo (c.) & BBC Symphony Orchestra
    -- Royal Albert Hall.
    ----------
    WITOLD LUTOSŁAWSKI (25 I 1913 - 7 II 1994) was a Polish composer and orchestral conductor. He was one of the major European composers of the 20th century, and one of the preeminent Polish musicians during his last three decades. Lutoslawski's compositions include classics of 20th-century music, alongside works of Bela Bartok, Sergei Prokofiev, Olivier Messiaen and the century's major composers. Musicologists divide his work into periods. Early work of his neo-classical period include Symphonic Variations (1938), Symphony No. 1 (1947) and Overture for strings (1949). Little Suite (1950) and Concert for Orchestra (1954) show Lutoslawski's interest in Polish folklore. His dodecaphonic period using the serial technique began with Five Songs, settings Kazimiera Illakowiczowna's texts (1957), and includes Musique Funebre (1958). Venetian Games (1961) began Lutoslawski's next period, with controlled aleatorism introducing chance elements into a compostion's rhythmical structure while strict organisation of dynamic levels is maintained. The Symphony No. 2 (1967) and Livre pour Orchestre (1968) summarise developments in this two-phase formal model in which the introductory part is followed by development of the composition's main idea. In Mi-Parti (1976) added a structural concept typical for Lutoslawski, with interlocking themes creating a chain structure, a formal principle evident in three numbered compositions titled Łańcuch / Chain.

    Lutosławski remains that rare composer with a distinctly defined, individual style in his works, despite differences in his various periods and constant development of his musical language. He found his path among aesthetic crossroads of the 20th century's second half, and pursued it with determination and a refined, evolving artistic sensibility. His music balances form and content, intellect and emotion. He belonged to no school of composition, did not succumb to trends and fashions. While not upholding traditions or joining avantgarde revolutions, he was both avantgarde and traditional and holds an enduring place among the 20th century's great composers.

    He began his conducting career with the pre-premiere in 1963 of Three Poems of Henri Michaux for choir and orchestra (1961-63), then traveled widely as a conductor, visiting France (1964), Czechoslovakia (1965), Holland (1969), Norway and Austria (1969). He conducted actively for the rest of his life, including engagements with the BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Sinfonietta, Orchestre de Paris, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and the WOSPRiT, currently known as the NOSPR. (CDN!).

  • Relaxing Chopin Compilation Mazurka Op Complete Classical Piano Music

    58:55

    Believe it or not random companies falsely try to say that they own the copyright for this music. We have gotten so many false copyright claims we are now going to list them so you can see how many ridiculous claims have been filed claiming that they own these works:

    False copyright complaint one:
    Copyright owners
    NaxosofAmerica
    On behalf of: CD Accord



    Youtube allows copyright trolls to go on unchallenged.

    Relax to the beautiful sounds of Chopin's exquisite music.

    Songs:
    Mazurka Op. 7 no. 3 in F minor
    Mazurka Op. 7 no. 4 in A flat major
    Mazurka Op. 17 no. 3 in A flat major
    Mazurka Op. 17 no. 4 in A minor
    Mazurka Op. 24 no. 2 in C major
    Mazurka Op. 24 no. 3 in A flat major
    Mazurka Op. 24 no. 4 in B flat minor
    Mazurka Op. 50 no. 1 in G major
    Mazurka Op. 50 no. 2 in A flat major
    Mazurka Op. 50 no. 3 in C sharp minor
    Mazurka Op. 56 no. 1 in B major
    Mazurka Op. 56 no. 2 in C major
    Mazurka Op. 56 no. 3 in C minor
    Mazurka Op. 59 no. 1 in A minor
    Mazurka Op. 59 no. 2 in A flat major
    Mazurka Op. 59 no. 3 in F sharp minor

    Composer: Frédéric Chopin

    Chopin started composing his mazurkas in 1825, and continued composing them until 1849, the year of his death. , Frédéric Chopin wrote at least 59 mazurkas for piano. Chopin based his mazurkas on the traditional Polish folk dance, also called the mazurka (or mazur in Polish). However, while he used the traditional mazurka as his model, he was able to transform his mazurkas into an entirely new genre, one that became known as a Chopin genre

    Born Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin, was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for the solo piano. He gained and has maintained renown worldwide as a leading musician of his era, whose poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation.

    Over 230 works of Chopin survive; some compositions from early childhood have been lost. All his known works involve the piano, and only a few range beyond solo piano music, as either piano concertos, songs or chamber music.
    Chopin was educated in the tradition of Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart and Clementi; he used Clementi's piano method with his own students. He was also influenced by Hummel's development of virtuoso, yet Mozartian, piano technique. He cited Bach and Mozart as the two most important composers in shaping his musical outlook. He is known as one of the greats in classical music. So relax away with chopin and his stunningly beautiful sonata. Many people say that his music helps them sleep.

    Links:
    Wikipedia:


    The Chopin Foundation:


    Biography:


    Chopin Sheet Music:

  • Henryk Górecki, Concerto for piano and string orchestra, Op 40

    8:21

    Henryk Górecki, Concerto for piano and string orchestra, Op. 40

    1. Alegro molto
    2. Vivace marcatissimo

    Tamara-Anna Cislowska, piano
    Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra
    Johannes Fritzsch, conductor

    Henryk Górecki, in full Henryk Mikołaj Górecki, (born Dec. 6, 1933, Czernica, near Rybnik, Pol.—died Nov. 12, 2010, Katowice), Polish composer in the Western classical tradition whose sombre Symphony No. 3 (1976) enjoyed extraordinary international popularity in the late 20th century.

    Górecki studied at the Music Academy of Katowice, Pol. The works of Anton Webern, Olivier Messiaen, and Karlheinz Stockhausen informed Górecki’s often atonal and violent early compositions. A change in his compositional style came in 1963 when, challenged to write simple tunes, he created Three Pieces in Old Style for orchestra. Folk songs, medieval music, and references to his Roman Catholic faith characterized his subsequent work, which frequently was based on tragic themes and cast in very slow tempi. “I want to express great sorrow,” Górecki said, as he contemplated various conflicts and hardships across the globe. “This sorrow, it burns inside me.”

    Górecki was elected provost of his alma mater, the Music Academy in Katowice, in 1975, but he resigned in protest four years later when the government refused to let Pope John Paul II visit the city. He then traveled to Kraków to conduct his choral work Beatus Vir for the pope and composed new pieces for subsequent papal visits to Poland. Górecki’s Miserere, also a choral composition, was written in 1981 to honour a Solidarity (Polish labour union) leader beaten by the militia; however, because of turbulent political circumstances, it was not until 1987 that the piece was performed.

    Until 1991 only one of Górecki’s works, Monologhi (1960), was available in the United States. By the end of 1993, however, some half dozen other compositions by Górecki had been recorded and distributed on a major international label. In part, the widespread interest in Górecki’s music may have been related to Poland’s emergence in 1989 from nearly five decades of communist rule. (Several of Górecki’s early works were indeed described as symbolic anticommunist protests.) In large measure, however, the composer’s rise in prominence was the result of the tremendously successful recording in 1992 of his Symphony No. 3: Symphony of Sorrowful Songs performed by soprano Dawn Upshaw and the London Sinfonietta, conducted by David Zinman. The album sold more than half a million copies worldwide at a time when the average classical album typically sold about 15,000 copies. Suddenly Górecki, who had seldom ventured beyond Katowice, became an international celebrity, traveling to London, Brussels, and New York City, holding press conferences, and appearing as the subject of a British television special.

    Symphony No. 3 consists of three movements in slow lento and largo tempi and is played at low dynamic levels throughout. It is based on a modal canon that gradually builds upward from low strings to the soprano voice, which enters with pastoral melody, suggesting an element of light amid otherwise dark shadows. The texts are Polish lamentations: a 15th-century monastic song, a folk song, and a prayer scratched in a cell wall by a girl imprisoned by the Gestapo. The repeated orchestral lines recall, to some listeners, minimalist techniques (a compositional style employing extreme simplicity of form). Upshaw’s performance in particular was highly acclaimed by critics, although praise for the Symphony No. 3 was not universal. Some critics dismissed it as simplistic.

    In the decade straddling the turn of the 21st century, Górecki composed or revised roughly 15 works, consisting mainly of vocal compositions and pieces for small ensemble. Górecki’s final work—The Song of Rodziny Katynskie, Opus 81, for unaccompanied chorus—was completed in 2004 and premiered by the Polish Radio Choir in Kraków in 2005.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Polska muzyka barokowa Mielczewski Canzona secunda a due Polish baroque music dawna Warszawa

    5:13

    Mielczewski:
    Canzona prima:
    Missa cerviensiana Kyrie i Gloria:
    Missa triumphalis Kyrie:
    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)


    Dawna Warszawa i jej okolice na obrazach Canaletta
    (Paintings of Warsaw by Canaletto (Bernardo Bellotto)):
    Wilanów
    Widok łąk wilanowskich
    Widok Ujazdowa i Łazienek
    Widok Warszawy od strony Pragi

    Polska muzyka renesansowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Mikołaj Gomółka
    Wacław z Szamotuł
    Mikołaj z Krakowa
    Marcin Leopolita
    Wojciech Długoraj
    Jakub Polak

    Polska muzyka barokowa (wybrani kompozytorzy):

    Bartłomiej Pękiel
    Mikołaj Zieleński
    Marcin Mielczewski
    Adam Jarzębski
    Grzegorz Gerwazy Gorczycki
    Sylwester Szarzyński
    Andrzej Rohaczewski

    NA MOIM KANALE (ON MY CHANNEL):
    (playlisty z przesłanych filmów, sent films in playlists)
    Polska muzyka ludowa (Polish Folk Music)
    Tradycyjna muzyka góralska (Polish Highlanders' Music)

    Polski folk

    Góry polskie zdjęcia

    Pan Wołodyjowski Potop muzyka

    Polska muzyka renesansowa i barokowa (Early Polish Music)

    Polska muzyka XVIII i XIX wieku (Polish Music 18 and 19 century)

    Chopin

    Norweska i szwedzka muzyka ludowa (Norwegian and Swedish Folk Music)

    Ukraińska muzyka ludowa (Ukrainian Folk Music)

    Beskid Niski

    Tatry w muzyce i malarstwie

    Polska muzyka filmowa (Polish Film Music)

    Polskie organy Leżajsk Oliwa Kamień Pomorski (Polish Organs)

  • Baby, ach te baby - foxtrot from Poland, 1933

    3:08

    Baby (Ach, te baby!) [Women (Oh, These Women!)] Fokstrot z filmu Zabawka (Foxtrott from the film A Toy) (Muz. Roman Palester, Tekst: J. Nel) Orkiestra Cristal-Electro dyr. Jerzy Lederman, Refren śpiewa Duet Corda, Cristal-Electro 1933 (Polish product)

    NOTES: Theres no question, foxtrott Baby, Ach te baby! belongs to Top Ten hits in the history of Polish song. Even a child in Poland is able to murmur the famous beginning of that Eugeniusz Bodo's song from 1933 film Zabawka: Baby, ach te baby!.... But beware! Polish word Baby has nothing to do with English a Baby , meaning a sweetheart, a honey or anything of the sort. Polish baby is the plural of the word baba, which is an abbreviation of Russian babushka - a big strong woman-like type with heavy fists and, sometimes, surprisingly loving heart. A crone? A hag? In Russia, it refers to a type of a peasant woman, most commonly present in the market places. In Poland, however, baba has acquired much softer and even a cuddlesome tint. In a jocular way it is used as a kind of a soft epithet for the whole female gender. Baby, ach te baby meaning, in a very imperfect translation, women, oh these women. Unfortunately, enormous variety of the nouns in the slavonic languages make the subtlity of the meaning of baba or its plural:baby, completely untranslateable into any of Western European languages.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    The song was composed by Roman PALESTER (born 1907 in Śniatyn, died 1989 in Paris) - one of great names in the history of Polish XXth century music. He was a composer and a vice-president (until 1939) of Polish Composers Society, his symphony music won prizes in international music festivals (1930 Ist Prize on Festival of International Contemporary Music Society in London; in 1937- Gold Medal at the World Expo in Paris). Composing popular music, mostly for films e.g. Zabawka (A Toy) with Eugeniusz Bodo or Dziewczęta z Nowolipek (Girls From Nowolipki Street) was merely his hobby. World War 2 meant for him the loss of most of his compositions during the total annihilation of the capital city after the Warsaw Uprising in 1944. From 1945-47 he was nominated for vice-president of Warsaw Conservatory, but due to his openly anti-communist attitude he could not continue his career. After composing music to a couple of films, like the world-famous war dramas Ostatni etap (The Last Etappe) about prisoners of Auschwitz and Ulica Graniczna (Graniczna Street) about the tragedy of the Warsaw Ghetto during the German occupation of Poland, also - the first post-war music melodrama Zakazane piosenki (Forbidden Songs), about love & music in nazi-occupied Warsaw - he emigrated to Munich, where he took directorship of the Cultural Section of Radio Free Europe. Later, he moved to Paris. His works were strictly forbidden in the communist Poland. He is buried at the Montmorency Cemetery.

  • Modern Classical Music 2020 | AIRAT ICHMOURATOV | classic composer, conductor, klezmer clarinetist

    3:57

    Airat Ichmouratov is Russian/Canadian classic composer, conductor, klezmer clarinetist.
    follow Airat on Instagram:
    and Facebook:

    His music has been performed by a wide range of ensembles and musicians in countries around the world, including Maxim Vengerov, Chamber Orchestra Moscow Virtuosi, Israeli Soloists Chamber Orchestra, Quebec Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Orchestra of India, Orchestre Métropolitain, Sinfonia Toronto, Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, Taipei Symphony Orchestra, Agnieszka Duczmal & Amadeus Chamber Orchestra of Polish Radio, Evgeny Bushkov & The State Chamber Orchestra of the Republic of Belarus, chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy, Longueuil Symphony Orchestra, New Orford String Quartet, Yuli Turovsky & I Musici de Montreal, Tatarstan National Symphony Orchestra just to name a few.

    also, check playlists:
    Orchestra music:
    Music for Chamber (String) Orchestra:
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    Airat Ichmouratov is a Russian / Canadian classic composer, conductor and klezmer clarinetist. (Modern Classical Music in 2020)
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  • Grazyna Bacewicz, Piano Concerto

    22:04

    Grazyna Bacewicz, Piano Concerto (1949)

    1. Allegro moderato
    2. Andante
    3. Molto allegro

    Magdalena Grzelak, piano
    Mieczysław Nowakowski, conductor


    Grażyna Bacewicz (5 February 1909 – 17 January 1969) was a Polish composer and violinist.
    Bacewicz was born in Łódź. Like Fryderyk Chopin, she came from a bi-national family and, with a Lithuanian father and a Polish mother, she could choose her national identity. She chose to be Polish, but her brother Witold moved back to Vilnius with her father, and ended up in the U.S. as a leading, though little understood, Lithuanian emigré composer.
    Bacewicz had received hear earliest musical training from her father; she started learning violin, piano and theory when she was five years old. Her other older brother, Kiejstut, became a pianist and frequently accompanied her in performances.
    After enrolling at the Warsaw Conservatory of Music to study violin and piano, in 1928 Bacewicz began studies of philosophy at the University of Warsaw (she completed a year and a half). She continued her music training at the Conservatory, studying composition with Kazimierz Sikorski, violin with Józef Jarzębski and piano with Jan Turczyński; she graduated summa cum laude in 1932.
    She studied composition with Boulanger, and violin with André Touret and Carl Flesch. At that time she adopted the neoclassical style for her compositional language and became the first Polish woman composer to achieve national and international stature.
    In the 1930s she was the principal violinist for the Polish Radio Orchestra, organized by the famous conductor, Grzegorz Fitelberg. During the war, she lived in Warsaw, continuing to compose and giving underground concerts (e.g. premiering her Suite for Two Violins). She also dedicated some time to family life: married in 1936, she gave birth to her only daughter, Alina Biernacka (now a famous painter), in 1942.
    After the war, she returned to work as a professor in the State Conservatory of Music in Łódź. During the Stalinist period from 1945 to 1955, Bacewicz, like all other composers, was subject to an increasing ideological control of the new, socialist government.
    She died of a heart attack in 1969 in Warsaw.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Romuald Twardowski, Concerto for violin

    18:07

    Romuald Twardowski, Concerto for violin

    1. Grave. Andante
    2. Allegro deciso

    Andrzej Gebski, violon and conductor
    The Zenon Brzewski Warsaw String Orchestra

    Romuald Twardowski (born 17 June 1930 in Wilno (Vilnius) is a Polish composer.
    During years of occupation or World War II, he studied violin playing and after the war piano and organ. In the years 1946-1950, he used to be organist in Vilnius churches. In 1952-1957, he studied composition in the conservatory of Vilnius. Later moves to Warsaw and continuous studies at Warsaw Academy of Music in years 1957-60 in Bolesław Woytowicz class. In the years 1963 and 1966 he studied Gregorian chant and medieval polyphony in Nadia Boulanger class in Paris. Since 1971 Romuald Twardowski has been the Professor of Fryderyk Chopin University of Music.

    The 1960s and 1970s were for the composer the most fruitful period.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Claudio Arrau - Nocturne N.º 1 in B Flat Minor, Op 9, No 1

    5:52

    F. Chopin by Claudio Arrau - Nocturne in B Flat Minor, Op 9, No 1
    _____The Nocturnes, Op. 9 are a set of three nocturnes written by Frédéric Chopin between 1830 and 1832, published that year, and dedicated to Madame Marie Pleyel. The second nocturne of the work is regarded as Chopin's most famous piece.
    This nocturne has a rhythmic freedom that came to characterise Chopin's later work. The left hand has an unbroken sequence of eighth notes in simple arpeggios throughout the entire piece, while the right hand moves with freedom in patterns of seven, eleven, twenty, and twenty-two notes.
    The opening section moves into a contrasting middle section, which flows back to the opening material in a transitional passage where the melody floats above seventeen consecutive bars of D-flat major chords. The reprise of the first section grows out of this, followed by a Picardy third ending.
    _____Frédéric François Chopin (1 March 1810 – 17 October 1849) was a Polish composer and virtuoso pianist of the Romantic era who wrote primarily for solo piano. He has maintained worldwide renown as a leading musician of his era, one whose poetic genius was based on a professional technique that was without equal in his generation.

    All of Chopin's compositions include the piano. Most are for solo piano, though he also wrote two piano concertos, a few chamber pieces, and some 19 songs set to Polish lyrics. His piano writing was technically demanding and expanded the limits of the instrument: his own performances were noted for their nuance and sensitivity. Chopin invented the concept of the instrumental ballade. His major piano works also include mazurkas, waltzes, nocturnes, polonaises, études, impromptus, scherzos, preludes and sonatas, some published only posthumously. Among the influences on his style of composition were Polish folk music, the classical tradition of J.S. Bach, Mozart, and Schubert, and the atmosphere of the Paris salons of which he was a frequent guest. His innovations in style, harmony, and musical form, and his association of music with nationalism, were influential throughout and after the late Romantic period.
    Chopin's music, his status as one of music's earliest superstars, his (indirect) association with political insurrection, his high-profile love-life, and his early death have made him a leading symbol of the Romantic era. His works remain popular, and he has been the subject of numerous films and biographies of varying historical fidelity.
    _____Claudio Arrau León (February 6, 1903 – June 9, 1991) was a Chilean pianist known for his interpretations of a vast repertoire spanning the baroque to 20th-century composers, especially Bach, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt and Brahms. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century.[1] Arrau was a pupil of Martin Krause, who was a student of Franz Liszt.
    Arrau recorded a considerable part of the piano music of Schumann, Chopin and Liszt. He edited the complete Beethoven piano sonatas for the Peters Urtext edition and recorded all of them on the Philips label in 1962–1966. He recorded almost all of them once again in 1984-1990 along with Mozart's complete piano sonatas. He is also famous for his recordings of Schubert, Brahms and Debussy.

  • Józef Wieniawski - Ballade Op. 31

    11:22

    Excuse me, Glenn. But may I have a request (:3)? Have you heard of Józef Wieniawski's (brother of the violinist Henryk Wieniawski) compositions? If you are interested, I hope and wish that you could upload some of his works so that I hope people would know more about his works; such as his Ballade and his second Concert Waltz, for example. (Matthew Adrien)

    Józef Wieniawski (23 May 1837 – 11 November 1912) was a Polish pianist, composer, conductor and teacher. He was born in Lublin, the younger brother of the famous violinist Henryk Wieniawski. After Franz Liszt, he was the first pianist to publicly perform all the études by Chopin. He appeared with Liszt in recitals in Paris, London, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Brussels, Leipzig and Amsterdam. Although now neglected, Józef Wieniawski enjoyed a reputation as one of Europe's finest musicians. At the very end of his life a young journalist asked him how long he intended to serve music. He replied: As long as I remain young!

    Józef Wieniawski studied at the Conservatoire de Paris with Pierre Zimmermann and Antoine François Marmontel in 1847, leaving in 1850. In 1855 he received a scholarship from the Tsar of Russia to study with Franz Liszt in Weimar and from 1856 until 1858 in Berlin with Adolf Bernhard Marx, with whom he studied music theory. After he had performed between 1851 and 1853 as a companion to his brother, he decided to follow a separate career as a piano virtuoso. On concert tours through Europe, he performed not only his own compositions, including the Piano Concerto in G minor, but also the works of composer Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Liszt, Schumann and Weber. According to Liszt, he was the first pianist after him to perform Chopin's études, all in public. After returning to Paris he established friendly relations with Rossini, Gounod, Berlioz and Wagner, also approaching the Imperial Court and becoming a favorite artist of Napoleon III. He then moved to Moscow where he was named to the piano faculty at the Moscow Conservatory, founded in 1866. Contrary to the affirmations of many established sources, he never became a professor at the Royal Conservatory of Brussels but lived again in this city from 1902. He died in Brussels, aged 75.

    Józef Wieniawski also had works by contemporary Polish composers in the repertoire, such as Stanisław Moniuszko, Moritz Moszkowski, Carl Tausig, Władysław Żeleński, Antoni Stolpe and Edouard Wolff. As a chamber musician he frequently performed with the most renowned violinists, cellists and singers of his time, including Pablo de Sarasate, Henri Vieuxtemps, Apolinary Katski, Eugène Ysaÿe, Jenő Hubay, Leopold Auer, Joseph Joachim, Carlo Alfredo Piatti, Ignacy Jan Paderewski, Louis Diémer, Pauline Viardot and Marcella Sembrich.

    In addition to a symphony and a piano concerto, Wieniawski composed among others a piano sonata, 24 études, two concert études, a ballad in E minor, polonaise, mazurka, barcarolles, impromptus, waltzes, and many short piano pieces. His compositions, written to be played at his own concerts, bear superior artistic qualities and technical difficulties of the highest level, giving so a clear idea of their author's performing abilities. He left 11 mechanical recordings of his piano pieces which to date have not come to light.

    (Wikipedia)

    Please take note that the audio AND sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to a minimum of 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio:
    (Performance by: Tomasz Kamieniak)
    Original sheet music: imslp.org

  • Wojciech Kilar, Symphony No 5 Advent for orchestra, chorus and soloists 2007

    40:45

    Wojciech Kilar, Symphony No. 5 Advent for orchestra, chorus and soloists (2007)

    1. Larghetto meditativo
    2. Largo religiosamente
    3. Andante solemnemente
    4. Largo supplichevolemente

    Silesian Philharmonic Orchestra & Chorus
    Miroslaw Jacek Blaszczyk, conductor

    Wojciech Kilar, Polish composer (born July 17, 1932, Lwow, Pol. [now Lviv, Ukr.]—died Dec. 29, 2013, Katowice, Pol.), wrote the music for more than 130 motion pictures, most notably the haunting, atmospheric scores that enhanced Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula (1992), Jane Campion’s The Portrait of a Lady (1996), and three films directed by Roman Polanski—Death and the Maiden (1994), The Ninth Gate (1999), and The Pianist (2002).

    Kilar’s score for the latter film was nominated for best music by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts award and won the César Award in France. He also worked with such Polish directors as Krzysztof Kieslowski, Andrzej Wajda, and Krzysztof Zanussi.

    Kilar graduated from the State Music Academy in Katowice in 1955, the same year that he composed his first orchestral work, Symphony No. 1 for Strings. He received a grant to study (1959–60) with Nadia Boulanger in Paris but returned to Poland. Throughout his career Kilar moved easily between composing for the cinema and for the concert hall; his work in both genres reflects his interest in Roman Catholicism and traditional Polish folk tunes, as well as the influence of such composers as Maurice Ravel and Arnold Schoenberg.

    Kilar’s best-known classical piece, the symphonic poem Krzesany (1974), was inspired by the people and music of the Tatra Mountains along the Poland-Slovakia border. Kilar received many international awards, and in 2012 he was presented with the Order of the White Eagle (Poland’s highest honour) for his contributions to Polish culture.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Juliusz Zarębski - Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 34

    35:17

    - Composer: Juliusz Zarębski (3 March 1854 -- 15 September 1885)
    - Performers: Waldemar Malicki (piano), Amar Corde String Quartet
    - Year of recording: 1997

    Quintet for Piano & Strings in G minor, Op. 34, written in 1885.

    00:00 - I. Allegro
    10:03 - II. Adagio
    20:51 - III. Scherzo
    26:41 - IV. Finale

    In 1935, at the peak of the neoclassical period, the Piano Quintet in G minor Op. 34 by Polish composer-pianist Juliusz Zarębski was published. The Quintet was written at the beginning of 1885, during the period of convalescence of the composer (who suffered from tuberculosis) in his home town of Żytomierz. The Quintet was the last and the most outstanding masterpiece written by Zarębski, who died in September of this same year at the age of 31. Zarębski was a member of the 19th century guild of composers and virtuosos. Extremely talented, he studied piano and composition in Vienna and St. Petersburg. He composed mainly salon and virtuoso music for the needs of his numerous tournées; the most famous collection is called Roses and thorns (Róże i ciernie).

    The great talent of Zarębski is reflected in the opinions of Franz Liszt, who had seen in him not only the great virtuoso (sharing the interest in a two-keyboard piano with the maestro from Weimar), but also a deeply sensitive composer. Liszt insisted that Zarębski should seriously devote himself to composing. It is therefore hardly surprising that the Quintet was dedicated to Liszt [À mon cher maître Fr. Liszt]. There are however clear musical reasons for this dedication. The Quintet emerges from the tradition of the New German School, whose outstanding figures were Liszt and Wagner. The origins of the work manifest itself in the richness of colour and harmony and also in treating the themes as if they were characters in a novel. That is why, instead of a classical motif work, we hear the metamorphosis of the characters, themes return in the subsequent parts, and the finale is the culmination in the synthetic style. It is not the form that captures our attention but the twists and turns of the narration. However, it must be added that the novel plays out in a highly abstract register. Therefore, it appears inappropriate to search for a concrete programme. After all, Liszt and Wagner did not write chamber music for a reason. The originality of this Polish chamber music masterpiece lies in the amicably incompatible combination of classical and Late Romantic traditions. But the beauty of the Quintet lies mostly in the music.

    - Allegro: Against the backdrop of murmuring waves of the piano, the strings sail in a broad unison, the theme in turn rolling but serious, and diatonic and broken in a chromatic prism. The second theme in E flat major balances this initial appassionato with a nocturne section: quite light, fanciful and twinkling. The march rhythms play an important role in this part. They are only a seasoning, they never crystallize into an independent theme. However, they give the piece intransigent, maybe even (especially with the connection with falling chromatic bass) fatal character. The particular feature is a gypsy C sharp. It appears in the theme; it causes an amazing journey into C-sharp minor in the second section of the development (ended with a solo, longing cello recitative); it is on show in the daring coda.
    - The second movement Adagio, begins and ends with bizarre music which suggests some kind of picture or landscape: maybe a starlight shimmering on dark waters? The foundation of Adagio is the lied (art song). The outermost parts have a hymnic character in B flat major; the middle section in G major can be described as idyllic, in accordance with the symbolic tradition of this key and the connotations of a 12/8 meter. However, Zarębski introduces a shadow, especially in the form of chromatics, which in turn gives an edge of surrealism to this idyll.
    - Truly diabolic is the Scherzo. Presto: full of frictions, dissonance, sudden changes, contrary accents and unnatural scales (a comeback of the gypsy Allegro note). Even the diatonic fragments, as a result of freezing the harmonic centre, create an impression of wildness. Quasi-folk melodies appear too (and they seem to be Russian: a 'kamarinskaya' dance).
    - The Finale. Presto begins with an epigraph taken from the previous movement, after which a cleansing calmness prevails. Further on, the music flows colourfully and capriciously, expressed in a rhapsodic sonata form. The first theme again resounds with a bawdy dance note, with a highly stylized (and therefore difficult to identify) character. The themes from the first and second movement return. The piece is crowned by a glorification of the Quintet first part's main theme.

    Fortunately, this piano quintet is now slowly starting to be played at concerts and rightfully so, because this masterpiece deserves a place among the biggest Romantic Piano Quintets.

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