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Playlist of List of Dutch composers

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  • The Great Composers Pt. 1 : The Dutch Composers 1

    13:45

    It's based on the list of Dutch composers from Wikipedia.

    Some composers aren't included because I can't find any music of them.

    Dedicated to my subscribers

    Dutch composers born in other countries are also included.

    And PLEASE give me your favorites from this part! (It's for the recap.)

    * Konrad Boehmer passed away in October 4, 2014.

  • The Great Composers Pt. 3 : The Dutch Composers 3

    19:07

    Dedicated to my subscribers.

    Please give me the composers and the pieces I missed from parts 1, 2, and 3 plus your favorites for the recap!

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  • The Best Organ Music from the Dutch Golden Age

    1:15:41

    Tracklist below.

    Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play):
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    Composers: Cornelis Schuyt, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck
    Artist: Matthias Havinga

    This attractive collection brings together organ music from the Dutch Golden Age; a period of great prosperity and power for the Republic of the Netherlands. During this era culture blossomed, with art, particularly painting and music, reaching a hitherto unknown level of refinement as exemplified in the works of Rembrandt and Sweelinck, among others.

    Cities of the Republic were centers of power, and the position of city organist was one of great prestige, as he was essentially responsible for coordinating local musical culture. His musical adaptability led him to compose in all manner of forms, as can be heard on this release – which effectively offers a postcard from the Dutch Golden Age through its variety of compositions: psalm arrangements, fantasias, dances and secular songs. As arguably the greatest Dutch composer of all time, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck’s music is a particularly prominent feature of the disc. Of his contrasting variation sets, many were based on secular songs (whose subjects range widely): More Palatino is a bawdy drinking song and Mein junges Leben hat ein End a melancholic melody in the ‘vanitas’ style, linking closely to popular themes in paintings of the time. Of the musical psalm settings for the organ, which were used to accompany the singing of a massed congregation and also performed during public “concerts” while people wandered through the church in great numbers, Anthoni van Noordt’s setting of Psalm 24 is particularly notable, beginning soberly, featuring an adventurous, expressive second variation, and ending grandly with the melody in the pedal. The Faber/Blank organ of the Jacobuskerk,

    Zeerijp, is well suited to the repertoire; dating from 1651, it was reconstructed to its original condition in 1979. In the hands of Matthias Havinga, who has won prizes at various international organ competitions and performed extensively in many European countries and in the USA, it is essential in recreating the sound world of the music as closely as possible.

    This beautiful programme, recorded in 2014, brings us back to the Golden Age of the Netherlands, the 16th and 17th century, in which cultural life blossomed thanks to the economical prosperity brought by the overseas trade. Wealthy merchants commissioned works by artists like Rembrandt, Vermeer, Ruischdael and others. Also musical life flourished, and musicians from all over Europe came to hear and study with Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck. Organist Matthias Havinga selected a beautiful bouquet of works by Dutch composers: Sweelinck, Van Noordt, Schuyt, Havingha (an ancient ancestor of the artist..?) and others.

    00:00:00 Fantasia chromatica in D Minor à 4 SwWV 258
    00:08:37 Almande Gratie [More Palatino] SwWV 318 [4 variations]
    00:13:02 6 Variations on “Mein junges Leben hat ein End” in A Minor, SwWV 324
    00:20:13 XLIX. Wilhelmus – XIV. Almande prynce
    00:22:15 Psalm 118 “Dancket den Heer seer hoogh’ ghepresen”
    00:25:00 Tabulatuur-boeck van psalmen en fantasyen: Psalm XXIV. Verse 1 à 4, pedaliter
    00:27:24 Tabulatuur-boeck van psalmen en fantasyen: Psalm XXIV. Verse 2 à 4
    00:29:47 Tabulatuur-boeck van psalmen en fantasyen: Psalm XXIV. Verse 3 à 4, in de Bas
    00:32:49 Ballo del Granduca in G Major, SwWV 319
    00:37:52 LVI. Daphne [3 verses]
    00:43:47 Psalm 36 SwWV 311 “Des boosdoenders wille seer quaet”: Variatio
    00:46:41 Psalm 36 SwWV 311 “Des boosdoenders wille seer quaet”: Secunda Variatio
    00:49:51 Psalm 36 SwWV 311 “Des boosdoenders wille seer quaet”: Tertia Variatio
    00:53:31 IV. De frans galliard
    00:54:22 XXXVI. Serbande
    00:56:08 XIII. Almande Brun Smeedelyn
    00:57:33 Malle Sijmen in D Major, SwWV 323
    00:59:12 12 Pavans and Galliards, and 2 Canzonas: Padovana
    01:03:34 12 Pavans and Galliards, and 2 Canzonas: Gagliarda
    01:05:21 Ouverture Octava: Vivace
    01:09:56 Fantasia in G Minor à 3 SwWV 271

  • Baroque Music from The Netherlands

    1:11:41

    Baroque Music from The Netherlands

    1. Johann Christian Schickhardt Concerto for flute, 2 oboes, strings in G minor 0:00
    2. Anton Wilhelm Solnitz Sinfonia in A major, Op 3/4 16:29
    3. Johannes Albertus Groneman Flute Concerto in G major 28:28
    4. Willem de Fesch Concerto for 2 violins,in B flat major, Op 10/2 36:26
    5. Johannes Albertus Groneman Flute Concerto in Gmajor 45:44
    6. Conrad Friedrich Hurlebusch Concerto in A minor for 2 oboes 1:00:04

    Musica ad Rhenum

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  • Minimal Piano Collection Vol. IV - VI by Jeroen van Veen

    3:30:58

    Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play):
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    This unusual collection is dedicated to a very popular style: minimal music. Over the years this has evolved from austere, almost strict repetition with tiny ‘movements’ to a more varied and free approach to material and technique.

    This set includes works for piano solo by most of the famous ‘minimal’ composers. Starting with initiator, if you will, Cage, and followed by the first generation entirely devoting itself to this style: Riley and Glass (Steve Reich did not write anything for solo piano). The next generation is represented by John Adams and Michael Nyman (his music for the film The Piano).

    Dutch pianist Jeroen van Veen is fascinated by minimal music. He was one of the initiators and participants of the highly successful complete recordings on 11 CD’s of Simeon ten Holt’s, a Dutch ‘minimalist’, complete works for multiple piano’s. On this solo album van Veen demonstrates his affinity with minimalism with great flair.

    The repertoire included here also comprises compositions by Satie, Friedrich Nietzsche and Arvo Pärt. There are two CD’s with music by the pianist himself and several recordings of minimal pieces by other present-day French, Belgian and Dutch composers.

    00:00:00 China Gates
    00:05:42 Für Alina
    00:08:33 Variationen Zur Gesundung Von Arinuschka
    00:13:06 In A Landscape
    00:22:00 Solodevilsdance IV
    00:56:58 Das ‘‘Fragment an Sich’’
    01:06:44 Vexations
    01:14:27 Avatâr
    01:19:46 Comptine d’Un Autre Été; L’après-midi
    01:22:08 Le Moulin
    01:25:22 La Dispute
    01:27:34 Sur Le Fil
    01:32:01 La Valse D’amélie
    01:34:44 Comptine d’Été No. 1
    01:37:41 Comptine d’Été No. 2
    01:40:23 Comptine d’Été No. 3

    01:43:10 Le Vieux En Veut Encore
    01:44:51 Toujours Là
    01:46:05 La Pièce Vide
    01:47:58 Big My Secret
    01:51:51 Lost And Found
    01:54:52 The Mood That Passes Through You
    01:57:55 Deep Sleep Playing
    02:00:03 Silver-Fingered Fling
    02:03:41 The Attraction Of The Pedalling Ankle
    02:10:27 The Heart Asks Pleasure First
    02:13:40 Time Lapse
    02:16:57 Fly Drive
    02:18:02 If
    02:22:25 Love
    02:25:58 Digital Tragedy
    02:28:57 Sheep ‘‘n Tides
    02:31:37 Lost And Found
    02:34:37 The Heart Asks Pleasure First

    02:38:00 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 1 In C
    02:43:41 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 2 In A Minor
    02:47:42 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 3 In G
    02:52:20 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 4 In E Minor
    02:56:43 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 5 In D
    03:00:08 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 6 In B Minor
    03:03:56 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 7 In A
    03:05:00 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 8 In F# Minor
    03:07:41 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 9 In E
    03:12:42 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 10 In C# Minor
    03:20:01 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 11 In B
    03:25:54 Minimal Préludes, Book I : Prélude Nr. 12 In G# Minor

  • Louis Andriessen - The nine symphonies of Beethoven for orchestra and ice cream bell

    9:16

    Louis Andriessen (1939)

    De negen symfonieën van Beethoven voor promenade-orkest en ijscobel (1970)


    Louis Andriessen is a Dutch composer, son of Hendrik Andriessen. After a few youthful works influenced by neo-classicism and serialism in the manner of Boulez he moved steadily away from the postwar European avant garde and towards American minimalism, jazz and Stravinsky. Out of these elements he has developed a musical language marked by extremes of ritual and masquerade, of monumentality and intimacy, of formal rigour and intuitive empiricism. The epitome of the Hague School, he is regarded as the most influential Dutch composer of his generation.
    Andriessen was born the youngest son of a musical family. His father and his elder brother Jurriaan, who passed on to him his musical experiences of Stravinskian neo-classicism and jazz, were his earliest mentors. Between 1957 and 1962 he studied composition at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague with Van Baaren. After receiving the composition prize there, he continued his studies with Berio in Berlin and Milan (1962--1965).
    Back in the Netherlands he played an active role in the increasing politicization of the arts put into practice during the Holland Festival in 1969 with the collective work Reconstructie, a music-theatre morality based on the character of Che Guevara; the composers involved were Schat, van Vlijmen, Reinbert de Leeuw and Misha Mengelberg, all former students of Van Baaren. Later the same year Andriessen was involved in the Notenkrakersactie, the disruption of a concert by the Concertgebouw Orchestra, whose artistic policy the protesters regarded as reactionary. This controversial act has since come to be seen as a turning-point in postwar Dutch musical life. For Andriessen it led to a permanent abandonment of the medium of the symphony orchestra. Convinced that musical renewal cannot be separated from the renewal of performance practice, he set up in 1972 De Volharding ('Perseverance') to perform his composition of the same name, and similarly in 1977, Hoketus, the result of a project at the Royal Conservatory; both ensembles have gone on to stimulate extensive new repertories. Andriessen began to teach composition and instrumentation at the Royal Conservatory in 1973, and in the mid-1980s started to be in great demand as a guest lecturer, particularly in the USA.

    The 9 Symphonies of Beethoven is not so much a comment on Beethoven himself as it is on the institution of the symphony. The twentieth century saw the breakdown of the large orchestra as the favoured compositional tool. Composers tended to use smaller ensembles with unconventional instrumental combinations in order to avoid any association with the bloated German Romanticism of the late 19th century.
    The piece is essentially a highlights reel of all nine symphonies with brief interpolations of other instantly recognisable music. In many ways, the 9 Symphonies was conceived in the spirit of the postmodern mashup that has become popular in recent years. The question is, does removing the context and presenting only the most popular bits make the piece more or less poignant? Is the experience enhanced by listening to 15 minutes of buildup or is it better just to listen to the best bits on their own?
    The symphonies are presented in order, generally speaking, with Für Elise, the Moonlight Sonata, and Rossini's Barber of Seville Overture making cameo appearances. Andriessen uses stylistic as well as melodic quotation and incorporates Europop, boogie-woogie and lounge music. The final joke is the interminable number of V-I cadences at the end of the piece. In this case, the jab is directed at Beethoven, who had an affinity for signalling the end of his symphonies more emphatically than was perhaps strictly necessary. The conclusion of his fifth symphony is a particularly fitting example.
    9 Symphonies is an early work of Andriessen's and was the only time he wrote anything for orchestra. His 1976 work De Staat (The Republic) brought him into the international spotlight and remains his most famous work.

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  • The Dutch Composer - Vincent Voois - - C64 chiptune

    4:38

    WHAT IS: UNEPIC STONED HIGH SID LIST

    List 2:
    Aiming to be the most complete playlist of tunes by *all* the musicians in the High Voltage Sid Collection that you never hear about.
    Links:



    For love of the SID chip and her composers, for love of the C64 and all her sceners.

  • Julius Röntgen - Symphony No. 3

    32:48

    Julius Röntgen (1855-1932)

    Symphony No. 3 in C minor (1910)

    1. Allegro molto e passionato - 00:00
    2. Andante, un poco sostenuto - 09:12
    3. Presto feroce - 16:23
    4. Largamente-Allegro-Largamente - 21:38

    Orchestra: Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz
    Conductor: David Porcelijn


    Julius Röntgen was a Dutch composer, conductor and pianist, son of Engelbert Röntgen. The most celebrated member of the family, he studied composition with Friedrich Lachner, harmony and counterpoint with Hauptmann and E.F. Richter and the piano with Louis Plaidy and Carl Reinecke. He began composing at the age of nine, and in 1869 he made his début as a composer at the Niederrheinisches Musikfest in Düsseldorf with a duo for two violins, performed by his father and Joseph Joachim. After giving concerts in Düsseldorf, Hamburg and Baden-Baden he settled in Cannstatt (1873-1874) as accompanist to the baritone Julius Stockhausen. He visited Liszt in Weimar in 1870.
    From 1877 to 1925 Röntgen lived in Amsterdam, where he became a piano teacher at the music school in 1878 (the school acquired conservatory status in 1884). From 1912 to 1924 he was director of the Amsterdam Conservatory, succeeding Frans Coenen and Daniël de Lange, and he remained there as a piano teacher until 1926. He succeeded G.A. Heinze as conductor of the choral society Excelsior (1884-1886) and Johannes Verhulst as conductor of the Amsterdam Toonkunstkoor (1886-1898); he also directed the Felix Meritis concerts for some time. As a pianist, he gave many recitals, was accompanist to the Dutch baritone Johannes Messchaert and Pablo Casals and, with his sons Julius Röntgen and Engelbert Röntgen, formed the Röntgen Trio before World War I. During his stay in Amsterdam he became friendly with Brahms, who visited the Netherlands in 1884 and 1885; he was also friendly with Grieg, who dedicated his Lyrische Stücke op.54 to him (1891). In 1925 he retired to a villa in Bilthoven to spend the remaining years of his life composing and writing; after World War II the Gaudeamus Foundation was established in his house.
    A prolific composer, Röntgen belongs to the late Romantic school. His early works show the influence of Schumann (in the Serenade for Wind op.14) and Brahms (in the Toskanische Rispetti op.9); in other works a Scandinavian influence can be detected, even in some written before his acquaintance with Grieg. He was also attracted by the folk music of many countries, especially evident in his Boerenliedjes en contradansen. In later years the influence of Reger is apparent in his polyphonic works, and the bitonal Symphony of 1930 looks back to Debussy.

  • Wolfgang Wijdeveld - Zondagsminiatuur

    4:43

    Wolfgang Wijdeveld (1910-1985)

    Zondagsminiatuur : voor harmonium, trompet en bekkens

    Wolfgang Wijdeveld, harmonium
    Nelly Boeree, trumpet
    Cees See, cymbals


    Wolfgang Wijdeveld was a Dutch composer. His father was the famous architect H.Th. Wijdeveld, his mother was the cellist Ellen Kohn and his grandmother the Polish pianist Ruscha Schönfeld, a pupil of Brahms. Wolfgang studied piano with Cornelius Berkhout and harmony with Willem van Warmelo. At the Amsterdam Conservatory of Music he studied piano with Willem Andriessen, theory with Sem Dresden and Anton Tierie and violin with Cor Kint. He also had singing lessons from Saar van Alphen and he studied composition for two years with Willem Pijper. At first Wijdeveld worked as a pianist and composer with the Yvonne Georgi ballet, Estelle Reed, and the Ballet of the Low Countries. He toured the Unites States in 1939 with the Yvonne Georgi Ballet. From 1940 till 1946 he was managing director of the Music School in Zwolle. From 1946 to 1976 he taught piano and (from 1962) methodology at the Utrecht Conservatory of Music and from 1966 to 1970 also at the Conservatory of Arnhem. He was a music critic at the daily Het Vrije Volk from 1956 till 1968. In 1962 and 1963 he gave concerts and seminars (together with his father) at 15 universities throughout North America. For many years he was chairman of the Amsterdam branch of the Royal Dutch Composers' Association. Wolfgang Wijdeveld wrote ballet music for one or two pianos with orchestra. Important works are: 'Symphonische Ouverture' for orchestra, songs, sonatas for piano, for violin and compositions for accordion and guitar.

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  • Jan Ingenhoven - Sonata for violin and piano No. 1

    8:27

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Sonate : voor viool en piano Nr. 1 (1919-1920)

    1. Prelude: Moderato - 00:00
    2. Andante con moto - 03:06
    3. Allegretto - 05:13
    4. Finale: Tempo di Prelude - 06:15

    Ilona Then-Bergh, violin
    Michael Schäfer, piano


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Jan van Gilse - Variations on a Saint Nicolas Song

    21:37

    Jan van Gilse (1881-1944)

    Variaties over een St. Nicolaasliedje : for orchestra (1909)

    Orchestra: Netherlands Symphony Orchestra
    Conductor: David Porcelijn


    Jan van Gilse was a Dutch composer. He studied composition and conducting with Franz Wüllner at Cologne University (1897--1902). In 1902 he was awarded a prize for his First Symphony by the Beethoven Haus in Bonn. After studying with Humperdinck at the Akademische Meisterschule in Berlin, he worked as a conductor at the Bremen Opera, then at the Noord-Nederlandsche Opera in Amsterdam. In 1909 his Third Symphony was awarded the Michael Beer prize, which enabled him to work and study in Italy for two years. Afterwards he settled in Munich. During World War I van Gilse and his family returned to the Netherlands, and in 1917 he was appointed conductor of the Utrecht SO, with whom he gave many performances of works by contemporary French and Dutch composers. A conflict with the young Dutch composer Willem Pijper led to his resignation in 1922. After a short stay in Switzerland van Gilse settled in Berlin, where he started work on his autobiography (MS, NL-DHgm). He returned to the Netherlands, where he was appointed principal of the Utrecht Conservatory. In 1937 he resigned his position in order to devote himself to composition. In 1940 he completed his opera Thijl, based on the story of Tijl Uilenspiegel. After the Germans invaded the Netherlands in May 1940, van Gilse publicly opposed the banning of Jews from concert halls. After organizing a petition in protest against the Nazification of Dutch artistic life, he was accused of high treason and went into hiding. During this period his two sons, also active in the resistance movement, were killed by the Nazis. Van Gilse could not cope with his grief and died after a short illness.
    In addition to his work as a composer, van Gilse played a role in founding institutions designed to promote the interests of Dutch composers: the Genootschap van Nederlandsche Componisten (1911), the Bureau voor Muziek Auteursrecht (BUMA, the composers' performing rights society, 1913). In 1935 van Gilse founded the Stichtung Nederlandsche Muziekbelangen to promote the performance of Dutch music. The foundation's archive containing microfilms of Dutch music manuscripts became, after van Gilse's death, the basis of the publishing house Donemus (founded in 1947).
    Van Gilse took a relatively long time to develop a personal style as a composer. His German training, and the music of Mahler especially, left its mark on his early works up to 1916. Those written during and shortly after his years in Utrecht (1917--1922) testify to his intensive study of the works of French composers such as Debussy, Ravel and Roussel, particularly in their use of short motifs, augmented chords, parallel harmonies and their striving after colourful, transparent orchestration. From these German and French influences, a synthesis gradually developed, culminating in the cantata Der Kreis des Lebens (1928--1929), the opera Thijl (1938--1940) and the unfinished declamation Rotterdam (1942). In these three works van Gilse achieved an individual style, which rejects the anti-Romanticism of the French-style works. In Rotterdam and Thijl he makes use of elements from folk music.

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Sonata for cello and piano No. 1

    8:53

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Sonate : voor cello en piano Nr. 1 (1919)

    Doris Hochscheid, cello
    Frans van Ruth, piano

    The CD and more information on Dutch Cello Sonatas are available at:


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Cornelis Dopper: Alt-Niederländische Suite

    13:05

    Composer: Cornelis Dopper

    Composition: Alt-Niederländische Suite (composed 1915)
    Old Netherlands Dance Suite for orchestra

    Orchestra: Stockerau Symphony Orchestra
    conducted by Ernest Frimmel

    Cornelis 'Kees' Dopper (7 February 1870, Stadskanaal – 19 September 1939, Amsterdam) was a Dutch composer, conductor and teacher.
    Born in the northern Dutch town of Stadskanaal, he came to study at the Leipzig conservatory with, among others, Carl Reinecke. After his studies he settled in Groningen, not far from his place of birth. His first opera, De blinde van Castel Cuillé (The Blind Girl of Castel Cuillé) was premiered in Amsterdam by De Nederlandse Opera under the baton of Cornelis van der Linden with some acclaim in 1894, and in that same year he entered the service of that company; here he worked as a violinist, chorus master and conductor.
    Dopper composed well over a hundred works. Because of his great love for Dutch folk song, culture and landscape, he was sometimes referred to as the 'most Dutch composer of all Dutch composers'. The titles of his symphonies attest to that sentiment: the 'Rembrandt' Symphony (No. 3, first performed on the tercentenary of Rembrandt's birth in 1906) , the 'Amsterdam' Symphony (No. 6), the 'Zuiderzee' Symphony (No. 7). Beside seven symphonies, Dopper wrote many other works for orchestra. Of these, his Ciaconna Gotica is the most famous, and is often considered to be Dopper's masterpiece. Many of his works were performed in great concert halls by famous conductors (e.g., Richard Strauss, Willem Mengelberg, Pierre Monteux and Otto Klemperer). (Ref: Wikipedia)

  • Pieter Hellendaal - Concerto Grosso Op. 3, No. 2

    11:10

    Pieter Hellendaal (1 April 1721 – 19 April 1799) was an Anglo-Dutch composer, organist and violinist. He was sometimes distinguished with the suffix The Elder, after the maturity of his musician son, Pieter Hellendaal the Younger.

    At age 30, he migrated to England where he lived for the last 48 of his 78 years. He was one of the most famous composers of Dutch origin in the 18th century.

    Grand Concerto Op. 3, No. 2

    Combattimento Amsterdam conducted by Jan Willem de Vriend

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Sonata for clarinet and piano

    6:17

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Sonate : voor A-klarinet en piano (1916-1917)

    Frans van Ruth, piano
    Frank van den Brink, clarinet


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Julius Röntgen, Suite Old Netherlands

    17:57

    Julius Röntgen, Suite Old Netherlands

    1. Janne moeie, al clear, al clear (4:15)
    2. Niet dan druk en lijden und is in't herte mijn (3:31)
    3. Contredans (3:54)
    4. Heer Halewijn zong een Liedekijn (6:17)

    Deutsche Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz
    David Porcelijn, conductor

    Julius Engelbert Röntgen (9 May 1855 – 13 September 1932) was a German-Dutch composer of classical music.
    Julius Röntgen was born in Leipzig, Germany, to a family of musicians. His father, the Dutch born Engelbert Röntgen, was first violinist in the Gewandhaus orchestra in Leipzig; his mother, Pauline Klengel, was a pianist, an aunt of the renowned cellist Julius Klengel, born in 1859.
    His first piano teacher was Carl Reinecke, the director of the Gewandhaus orchestra, while his early compositions were influenced by Reinecke, but also by Robert Schumann, Franz Liszt and Johannes Brahms.
    In 1870, at the age of 14, Julius Röntgen visited Franz Liszt in Weimar; after playing piano for him he was invited to a soiree at Liszt's house.

    In Leipzig, he and his parents were part of the musical circle around Heinrich von Herzogenberg, and it was at their house that he first met Brahms. Later Röntgen moved to Munich, where he studied piano under Franz Lachner, a friend of Franz Schubert. At the age of 18 he became a professional pianist. During a concert tour through southern Germany he became acquainted with the singer Julius Stockhausen; at this time he also met a Swedish music student Amanda Maier, whom he would marry in 1880.
    In 1877 Röntgen had to make a decision whether to go to Vienna or Amsterdam. He chose Amsterdam, and became a piano teacher in the music school there.
    Between 1878 and 1885 Brahms was a frequent visitor in Amsterdam. In 1887 Röntgen performed Brahms's second piano concerto, conducted by the composer himself.

    Röntgen also played an important part in establishing institutions for classical music in Amsterdam. In 1883, in association with composers Frans Coenen and Daniel de Lange, Röntgen founded the Amsterdam Conservatory. In 1884 Röntgen was heavily involved in the foundation of the Concertgebouw. He applied for the position of the director; however, to his great disappointment, the choice fell instead on the German Hans von Bülow, as the committee seemed to doubt Röntgen's abilities as a conductor. Nevertheless, Bülow was not able to accept the appointment, and the position went in the end to the violinist Willem Kes.

    For some years, Röntgen and his sons performed together as a piano trio. After the death of his wife Amanda in 1894, Röntgen married the gifted piano teacher Abrahamina des Amorie van der Hoeven. The children of the second marriage also became professional musicians. Röntgen's son Joachim, a violinist, founded the Röntgen String Quartet.

    At the end of the First World War, in 1919, Röntgen became a naturalized Dutch citizen.
    In the years from 1920 on Röntgen experimented with atonal music; he wrote e.g. a bi-tonal symphony in 1930.

    In 1924 Röntgen retired from public life. He moved to Bilthoven, a small village near Utrecht. His son Frants, who followed a career in architecture, designed for him the country house Gaudeamus. The unusual round music room in that house was constructed in such a way that its floor did not touch the ground, but hung from the ceiling. During the last eight years of his life Röntgen wrote about 100 compositions, mostly chamber music and songs. Gaudeamus became a meeting place for many important composers and musicians; among the visitors in that house were Pablo Casals and Percy Grainger. At that time, Röntgen studied musical analysis and was interested in the work of Hindemith, Stravinsky, Schönberg, and Willem Pijper.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Jurriaan Andriessen, Berkshire Symphonies Symphony No 1

    30:44

    Jurriaan Andriessen, Berkshire Symphonies (Symphony No. 1) (1949)

    1. Poco adagio - Allegro giusto
    2. In Memoriam Of Alban Berg (6 Variations And Coda)
    3. Vivace - Trio
    4. Allegro ritmico alla breve

    Netherlands Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Alexander Vedernikov, conductor

    Dedicated to Serge Koussevitzky

    Jurriaan Hendrik Andriessen (15 November 1925, Haarlem – 19 August 1996, The Hague) was a Dutch composer, whose father, Hendrik, brother Louis, and uncle Willem have also been notable composers. Andriessen studied composition with his father at the Utrecht Conservatory before moving to Paris where he studied with Olivier Messiaen.

    The bulk of Andriessen's output is for the stage; his study in Paris was primarily in writing film music. He had a variety of musical influences which he drew upon, including American film music, Aaron Copland's ballets, folk music of various cultures, neoclassicism, and serialism; this eclecticism combined with his compositional skill made his writing well-suited to scoring dramatic works. His first stage composition was incidental music for The Miraculous Hour, a play premiered at the celebration of the 50th year of Queen Wilhelmina's reign, in 1948. In 1954 the Haagse Comedie (now the Nationaal Toneel, or National Theatre) appointed him resident composer, where he wrote scores for Eugene O'Neill's Mourning Becomes Electra and Tom Stoppard's Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead, among numerous others.

    His stay in the United States on a Rockefeller Foundation fellowship from 1949 to 1951 was a fruitful one for his orchestral writing, another notable area of his work; during this time he composed the Tanglewood Overture for Serge Koussevitsky, and the Berkshire Symphonies, later used as ballet music by George Balanchine. His compositions were commissioned for state celebrations, including the wedding and the coronation of Queen Beatrix and the silver jubilee of Queen Juliana.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Wolfgang Wijdeveld - Violin Sonata

    14:41

    Wolfgang Wijdeveld (1910-1985)

    Sonate : voor viool en piano (1948)

    1. Allegro precipitoso - 00:00
    2. Larghetto - 07:42
    3. Presto scherzando - 11:52

    Junko Naito, violin
    Ton Hartsuiker, piano

    dedicated to Thomas Magyar


    Wolfgang Wijdeveld was a Dutch composer. His father was the famous architect H.Th. Wijdeveld, his mother was the cellist Ellen Kohn and his grandmother the Polish pianist Ruscha Schönfeld, a pupil of Brahms. Wolfgang studied piano with Cornelius Berkhout and harmony with Willem van Warmelo. At the Amsterdam Conservatory of Music he studied piano with Willem Andriessen, theory with Sem Dresden and Anton Tierie and violin with Cor Kint. He also had singing lessons from Saar van Alphen and he studied composition for two years with Willem Pijper. At first Wijdeveld worked as a pianist and composer with the Yvonne Georgi ballet, Estelle Reed, and the Ballet of the Low Countries. He toured the Unites States in 1939 with the Yvonne Georgi Ballet. From 1940 till 1946 he was managing director of the Music School in Zwolle. From 1946 to 1976 he taught piano and (from 1962) methodology at the Utrecht Conservatory of Music and from 1966 to 1970 also at the Conservatory of Arnhem. He was a music critic at the daily Het Vrije Volk from 1956 till 1968. In 1962 and 1963 he gave concerts and seminars (together with his father) at 15 universities throughout North America. For many years he was chairman of the Amsterdam branch of the Royal Dutch Composers' Association. Wolfgang Wijdeveld wrote ballet music for one or two pianos with orchestra. Important works are: 'Symphonische Ouverture' for orchestra, songs, sonatas for piano, for violin and compositions for accordion and guitar.

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Sonata for cello and piano No. 2 Quasi una fantasia

    6:29

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Sonate 'Quasi una fantasia' : voor cello en piano Nr. 2 (1922)

    Doris Hochscheid, cello
    Frans van Ruth, piano

    The CD and more information on Dutch Cello Sonatas are available at:


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Pieter Hellendaal - Concerto Grosso Op. 3, No. 5

    17:16

    Pieter Hellendaal (1 April 1721 – 19 April 1799) was an Anglo-Dutch composer, organist and violinist. He was sometimes distinguished with the suffix The Elder, after the maturity of his musician son, Pieter Hellendaal the Younger.

    At age 30, he migrated to England where he lived for the last 48 of his 78 years. He was one of the most famous composers of Dutch origin in the 18th century.

    Grand Concerto Op. 3, No. 5

    Combattimento Amsterdam conducted by Jan Willem de Vriend

  • x
  • Jan van Gilse, Concert overture in C minor for orchestra 1900

    9:44

    Jan van Gilse, Concert overture in C minor for orchestra (1900)

    Netherlands Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Jac van Steen, conductor

    Jan Pieter Hendrik van Gilse (Rotterdam, 11 May 1881 – Oegstgeest, 8 September 1944) was a Dutch composer and conductor. Among his works are five symphonies and the Dutch-language opera Thijl.
    Coming from a family of theologians, Jan van Gilse showed an early aptitude for piano playing and composing. From 1897 onwards, he studied at the Cologne conservatory. After his teacher, Franz Wüllner, died in 1902, he continued his studies with Engelbert Humperdinck in Berlin. From 1909 to 1911, he studied in Italy. In 1901, van Gilse received the Beethoven-Haus Prize in Bonn for his (First) Symphony in F major; In 1906, the Michael Beer Prize was awarded to him for his Third Symphony, 'Erhebung' ('Elevation'; for soprano solo and orchestra).

    In addition to composing, van Gilse soon developed an interest in conducting. He started out with the Bremen Opera, a post which was followed by appointments in Munich and Amsterdam. After the outbreak of the First World War made travel difficult, he moved back to the Netherlands. From 1917 until 1922 he was the conductor of the Utrecht Municipal Orchestra (Utrechtsch Stedelijk Orkest).

    In 1921, van Gilse resigned the post after a conflict with the orchestra's board of directors. Van Gilse had been attacked for some time by the composer and music critic Willem Pijper in the daily Utrechts Dagblad, attacks that grew in viciousness as time progressed. Van Gilse's request that Pijper be denied access to concerts was stalled for so long that he lost faith and resigned. The board subsequently refused him a farewell concert.

    Eight years later van Gilse put the experiences from his tenure in Utrecht on paper. The autobiography that materialised was sizeable and contained almost 350,000 words. However, because he didn't spare anyone or anything (including himself), van Gilse doubted whether the manuscript would ever see the light of day. It was eventually edited and published in 2003.

    During World War II, van Gilse became actively involved with the resistance movement against the German occupation of the Netherlands. Both his sons, who were also resistance fighters, were killed by the occupiers before van Gilse himself succumbed (probably to pneumonia) in the autumn of 1944. To protect his shelter, he was buried in an unmarked grave outside the village of Oegstgeest.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Sonata for violin and piano No. 2

    7:53

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Sonate : voor viool en piano Nr. 2 (1921)

    1. Allegro moderato - 00:00
    2. Andante con moto - 02:48
    3. Allegro - 05:56

    Ilona Then-Bergh, violin
    Michael Schäfer, piano


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Alphons Diepenbrock, Hymne Novalis

    8:44

    Alphons Diepenbrock, Hymne (Novalis)
    “Wenige wissen das Geheimnis de Liebe”

    Christoph Homberger, teno
    Residentie Orchestra The Hague
    Hans Vonk, conductor

    Alphonsus Johannes Maria Diepenbrock (2 September 1862 in Amsterdam – 5 April 1921) was a Dutch composer, essayist and classicist.
    Diepenbrock was not a musician by training. Brought up in a prosperous Catholic family, although he showed musical ability as a child, the expectation was that he would enter a university rather than a conservatory. And so he studied classics at the University of Amsterdam, gaining his doctorate cum laude in 1888 with a dissertation in Latin on the life of Seneca. The same year he became a teacher, a job which he held until 1894, and his decision to devote himself to music. As a composer, he had been completely self-taught from an early age.

    He created a musical idiom which, in a highly personal manner, combined 16th-century polyphony with Wagnerian chromaticism, to which in later years was added the impressionistic refinement that he encountered in Debussy's music.

    His predominantly vocal output is distinguished by the high quality of the texts used. Apart from the Ancient Greek dramatists and the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church, he was inspired by, among others, Goethe, Novalis, Vondel, Brentano, Hölderlin, Heine, Nietzsche, Baudelaire and Verlaine.

    As a conductor, he performed many contemporary works, including Gustav Mahler's Fourth Symphony (at the Concertgebouw) as well as works by Fauré and Debussy.
    Throughout his life, Diepenbrock continued his interests in the wider cultural sphere, remaining a classics tutor and publishing works on literature, painting, politics, philosophy and religion. Indeed, during his lifetime his musical skills were often overlooked. Nonetheless, Diepenbrock was very much a respected figure within musical circles. He counted amongst his friends Mahler, Richard Strauss and Arnold Schoenberg.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Herman Strategier, Musique pour faire Plaisir

    13:01

    Herman Strategier, Musique pour faire Plaisir

    1. Con spirito
    2. Andante cantabile
    3. Allegro (Fugue)
    4. Rondo – Final

    Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra
    Roelof Krol, conductor

    Herman Strategier is born on August 10, 1912 in Arnhem in the Netherlands. On October 26, 1988, Herman Strategier dies in his sleep after an incurable disease.

    Herman Strategier is a Roman Catholic church musician, composer, conductor, organist and teacher. He composes around 400 works for the most diverse line-ups and genres, mostly commissioned. Just like Jan Mul and Albert de Klerk, he was first and foremost strongly influenced by the monumental style of Hendrik Andriessen, who in the Catholic church music had a strong opposition to the style of neo-Palestinian Caecilianism and late Romantic German in the Netherlands. idiom. In addition, the music of Strategier, Mul and De Klerk shows the influence of Gregorian chant in its melody formation and many modal twists, while thanks to their familiarity with Renaissance and Baroque music, their polyphony techniques are richly provided with polyphonic techniques such as the motet style and canons.
    Finally, they are all strongly inspired by the music of composers such as Gabriel Fauré, Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel. In his compositions, the great admiration of Strategier voor Fauré leads to playful, easily accessible music and a transparent play of lines with a smooth voice, from which a subtle harmonics naturally ensues. It is striking from his chamber music pieces that Strategier is not a composer of the grand gesture, but rather of delicately conceived miniatures.
    For a large number of years, Strategier occupies a prominent position in Dutch music life, as a church musician, as a composer, as a teacher and as a government commissioner in countless music exams. As a teacher, he writes choral exercises and, on behalf of the State Exams Music in which he has been involved for years, dozens of solfèges. Herman Strategier is distinguished twice for his great merits, in 1968 as Knight in the Order of Orange-Nassau and in 1973 as Knight in the Order of Saint Gregory the Great.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Johannes Verhulst, Overture in C Minor, Gijsbrecht van Amstel Op 3

    8:58

    Johannes Verhulst, Overture in C Minor, Gijsbrecht van Amstel Op. 3

    Netherlands Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Jac van Steen, conductor

    Johannes Joseph Hermann Verhulst (March 19, 1816 in The Hague – January 17, 1891 in Bloemendaal) was a Dutch composer and conductor. As a composer mainly of songs and as administrator of Dutch musical life, his influence during his lifetime was considerable.
    As a boy, Verhulst sang in a Catholic choir; here he distinguished himself by his gift for music. In his teens, he succeeded in becoming a first violinist in the court chapel of King William I. In 1836, Felix Mendelssohn, who was on holiday in Scheveningen, was shown an overture written by Verhulst, and took him as a pupil; he began studying with Mendelssohn in 1838.

    In Leipzig, Verhulst was appointed as conductor of the Euterpe orchestra, for which he wrote his Symphony in E minor. King William II urged him to return to The Hague in 1842, where he dedicated himself to the writing of Dutch songs for some time. Six years later, he became the chief conductor of the Rotterdam Music Society (Maatschappij tot Bevordering der Toonkunst). For the celebration of its fifty-year anniversary in 1854, he succeeded in engaging many prominent musicians, such as Franz Liszt.

    The following years would bring a number of other appointments: 1860 as conductor of concerts at the scientific society Diligentia Society in The Hague, and 1864 at both the orchestral society Caecilia and the Felix Meritis Society in Amsterdam. By accepting these positions, Verhulst had acquired a great amount of power and influence on Dutch music life. However, his conservative taste led to an increasing amount of criticism, particularly his refusal to endorse or execute performances of the music of Berlioz, Franz Liszt, and most of all Wagner. If orchestra directors wished to see works by these composers performed, they had to handle the organisation themselves and engage a guest conductor - and risk the wrath of Verhulst, which could be considerable. This led to a public backlash, and in 1883 Diligentia imposed Richard Hol as a substitute conductor for performances of Wagner. In 1886, Verhulst was appointed an honorary member of Diligentia on the occasion of his seventieth birthday, but the membership was revoked after less than three months. Hereupon he withdrew from his other positions and from public life. He died in the town of Bloemendaal, aged 74.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Chamber music for clarinet and string trio

    4:56

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Kammermusik in fünf Sätzen : voor klarinet en strijktrio (1926)

    Trio Lumaka
    Olivier Patey, clarinet


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • You Raise me Up - André Rieu

    4:41

    André Rieu & His Johann Strauss Orchestra performing 'You Raise Me Up' live at Mainau, Germany. Taken from the DVD 'Roses from the South'.

    For concert dates and tickets visit:

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  • Rudolf Escher, Symphony No 1 1953 1954

    30:21

    Rudolf Escher, Symphony No. 1 (1953-1954)

    1. Allegro assai e cantabile
    2. Adagio poco maestoso, ma sempre con grazia
    3. Presto leggiero e scorrevole

    Netherlands Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Lucas Vis, conductor

    Rudolf Escher, in full Rudolf George Escher, (born January 8, 1912, Amsterdam, Netherlands—died March 17, 1980, Texel), Dutch composer and music theoretician especially noted for his chamber works.

    Escher studied at the Rotterdam Conservatory from 1931 to 1937, but most of his early compositions were lost in the bombing of Rotterdam during World War II.
    During 1945 and 1946 he worked as a music editor for De Groene Amsterdammer. He held a variety of editorial and teaching posts from 1946 to 1964, at which time he began teaching contemporary music at the University of Utrecht. He is noted for his excellent essays on Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel.

    The first composition for which Escher received wide notice was an orchestral piece, Musique pour l’esprit en deuil (1943). Several instrumental and orchestral pieces followed, and in the 1950s and following years he composed a number of interesting vocal works, including Strange Meeting (1952; to words by Wilfred Owen), Le vrai visage de la paix (1953; to words by Paul Éluard), and Songs of Love and Eternity (1955; to words by Emily Dickinson). His chamber piece Le tombeau de Ravel (1952) was very well received. His later works include Univers de Rimbaud (1970), for orchestra and voices; Sinfonia for 10 instruments (1973–76); and 3 Poems (1975; to words by W.H. Auden) for chamber chorus.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Schindlers list - John Williams - NL orchestra

    4:49

    Simone Lamsma (violin) - Davida Scheffers (cor anglais)
    Watch til the end, emotion guaranteed...
    Davida Scheffers has lived her dream in winning a contest and the opportunity to play with the dutch Orchestra. Davida suffers from an extremely painful neuromuscular condition that derailed her career, and she thought she would never get to play in a professional orchestra again... The young blond lady is her daughter and was 18 years old that day.
    - All racist or offensive comments will be reported and deleted.
    - Video from RTL Netherlands show.
    - Special thanks to RTL NL for not blocking this video for copyrighting, masterpiece of human feelings representation through music. It had to be shared...

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Three pieces for flute, clarinet and bassoon

    6:31

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Drei Stücke für drei instrumente : voor fluit, klarinet en fagot (1928)

    Ingrid Geerlings, flute
    Frank van den Brink, clarinet
    Jos Lammerse, bassoon


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Alphons Diepenbrock, Elektra Symphonic Suite

    19:41

    Alphons Diepenbrock, Elektra Symphonic Suite

    1. Andante agitato – Adagio
    2. Presto – Andantino moderato – Presto
    3. Lento – Sostenuto e agitato – Largamente
    4. Allegro agitato – Maestoso

    Residentie Orchestra The Hague
    Hans Vonk, conductor

    Alphonsus Johannes Maria Diepenbrock (2 September 1862 in Amsterdam – 5 April 1921) was a Dutch composer, essayist and classicist.
    Diepenbrock was not a musician by training. Brought up in a prosperous Catholic family, although he showed musical ability as a child, the expectation was that he would enter a university rather than a conservatory. And so he studied classics at the University of Amsterdam, gaining his doctorate cum laude in 1888 with a dissertation in Latin on the life of Seneca. The same year he became a teacher, a job which he held until 1894, and his decision to devote himself to music. As a composer, he had been completely self-taught from an early age.

    He created a musical idiom which, in a highly personal manner, combined 16th-century polyphony with Wagnerian chromaticism, to which in later years was added the impressionistic refinement that he encountered in Debussy's music.

    His predominantly vocal output is distinguished by the high quality of the texts used. Apart from the Ancient Greek dramatists and the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church, he was inspired by, among others, Goethe, Novalis, Vondel, Brentano, Hölderlin, Heine, Nietzsche, Baudelaire and Verlaine.

    As a conductor, he performed many contemporary works, including Gustav Mahler's Fourth Symphony (at the Concertgebouw) as well as works by Fauré and Debussy.
    Throughout his life, Diepenbrock continued his interests in the wider cultural sphere, remaining a classics tutor and publishing works on literature, painting, politics, philosophy and religion. Indeed, during his lifetime his musical skills were often overlooked. Nonetheless, Diepenbrock was very much a respected figure within musical circles. He counted amongst his friends Mahler, Richard Strauss and Arnold Schoenberg.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Trio for violin, cello and harp

    8:05

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Cinq pièces pour trois instruments divers, deel V : voor viool, cello en harp (1918)

    Heleen Hulst, violin
    Astrid Haring, harp
    Mick Stirling, cello


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Minimal Piano Collection Vol. VII - IX By Jeroen van Veen

    3:40:42

    Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play):
    More Information:
    Brilliant Classics Spotify:
    Brilliant Classics Facebook:

    This unusual collection is dedicated to a very popular style: minimal music. Over the years this has evolved from austere, almost strict repetition with tiny ‘movements’ to a more varied and free approach to material and technique.

    This set includes works for piano solo by most of the famous ‘minimal’ composers. Starting with initiator, if you will, Cage, and followed by the first generation entirely devoting itself to this style: Riley and Glass (Steve Reich did not write anything for solo piano). The next generation is represented by John Adams and Michael Nyman (his music for the film The Piano).

    Dutch pianist Jeroen van Veen is fascinated by minimal music. He was one of the initiators and participants of the highly successful complete recordings on 11 CD’s of Simeon ten Holt’s, a Dutch ‘minimalist’, complete works for multiple piano’s. On this solo album van Veen demonstrates his affinity with minimalism with great flair.

    The repertoire included here also comprises compositions by Satie, Friedrich Nietzsche and Arvo Pärt. There are two CD’s with music by the pianist himself and several recordings of minimal pieces by other present-day French, Belgian and Dutch composers.

    This attractive set will appeal to a wide audience and sheds light on the present state of minimalism

    00:00:00 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 13 In F Sharp
    00:06:53 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 14 In E Flat Minor
    00:12:11 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 15 In D Flat
    00:14:47 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 16 In B Flat Minor
    00:17:43 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 17 In A Flat
    00:22:17 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 18 In F Minor
    00:32:27 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 19 In E Flat
    00:36:21 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 20 In C Minor
    00:40:34 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 21 In B Flat
    00:45:12 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 22 In G Minor
    00:51:16 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 23 In F
    00:57:24 Minimal Préludes, Book II : Prélude Nr. 24 In D Minor
    01:07:18 Struggle for Pleasure
    01:12:27An Hour for Piano
    02:11:49 Postnuclear Winterscenario Nr. 1
    02:21:24 Toccata Americana
    02:28:26 Echo
    02:31:32 Three Minimal Preludes
    02:42:44 In C

  • Wolfgang Wijdeveld - Three songs on poems by Walt Withman

    12:30

    Wolfgang Wijdeveld (1910-1985)

    Drie liederen op tekst van Walt Whitman : voor middenstem, viool, altviool, clarinet en piano (1949)

    1. Song of the open road - 00:00
    2. Tears - 05:25
    3. Youth, day, old age and night - 10:56

    Julia Bronkhorts, soprano
    Junko Naito, violin
    Guus Jeukendrup, viola
    Fleur Bouwer, clarinet
    Jacco Lamfers, piano

    dedicated to Ré Koster


    Wolfgang Wijdeveld was a Dutch composer. His father was the famous architect H.Th. Wijdeveld, his mother was the cellist Ellen Kohn and his grandmother the Polish pianist Ruscha Schönfeld, a pupil of Brahms. Wolfgang studied piano with Cornelius Berkhout and harmony with Willem van Warmelo. At the Amsterdam Conservatory of Music he studied piano with Willem Andriessen, theory with Sem Dresden and Anton Tierie and violin with Cor Kint. He also had singing lessons from Saar van Alphen and he studied composition for two years with Willem Pijper. At first Wijdeveld worked as a pianist and composer with the Yvonne Georgi ballet, Estelle Reed, and the Ballet of the Low Countries. He toured the Unites States in 1939 with the Yvonne Georgi Ballet. From 1940 till 1946 he was managing director of the Music School in Zwolle. From 1946 to 1976 he taught piano and (from 1962) methodology at the Utrecht Conservatory of Music and from 1966 to 1970 also at the Conservatory of Arnhem. He was a music critic at the daily Het Vrije Volk from 1956 till 1968. In 1962 and 1963 he gave concerts and seminars (together with his father) at 15 universities throughout North America. For many years he was chairman of the Amsterdam branch of the Royal Dutch Composers' Association. Wolfgang Wijdeveld wrote ballet music for one or two pianos with orchestra. Important works are: 'Symphonische Ouverture' for orchestra, songs, sonatas for piano, for violin and compositions for accordion and guitar.

  • Willem Pijper - Sonatina No. 3

    3:42

    - Composer: Willem (Frederik Willem Johannes) Pijper (8 September 1894 -- 18 March 1947)
    - Performer: Hans Henkemans
    - Year of recording: 1969 (?)

    Sonatina No. 3, for piano, written in 1925.

    00:00 - Molto adagio
    00:26 - Un poco più mosso
    01:36 - Doppio movimento
    01:57 - Molto adagio
    02:10 - Allegro non troppo
    02:59 - Molto adagio

    Pijper's sonatina no. 2 and no. 3 are the best examples of sonatinas written by a Dutch composer, the sonatina was a style of composition that became very popular among Dutch composers after Pijper wrote his famous 3 sonatinas. They feature Pijper's polymeters, polytonality and germ-cell techniques, compositional tools which he really could develop in these sonatinas. His sonatina no. 2 and no.3 are full of creative and inspired writing, he manages to say so much in their short length, and it is the reason that these pieces are still being played in Dutch conservatories these days.

  • Blade Runner Suite // The Danish National Symphony Orchestra

    10:34

    #Galaxymphony #FilmMusicLive #DNSO
    Get tickets for DNSOs concerts:

    Composed by Vangelis
    Saxophone: Anders Banke
    Narrator: David Bateson

    In June 2017, The Danish Broadcast Corporation (DR) aired a concert called “Galaxymphony” performed by The Danish National Symphony Orchestra with the chamber choirs Hymnia and Camerata conducted by Anthony Hermus.

    The music performed was soundtracks from a wide range of sci-fi movies

    Featured composers were John Williams, James Horner, Eric Serra, Richard Strauss, Vangelis and Jerry Goldsmith.

    Set design: Nikolaj Trap
    Light design: Mikael Sylvest
    Director of photography: Karsten Andersen
    Executive Producer, idea and concept: Nicolai Abrahamsen

    Performed and recorded in DR Koncerthuset

    All rights reserved DR 2017

  • Minimal Piano Collection Vol. I - III By Jeroen van Veen

    3:4:13

    Online purchase or streaming (Spotify, iTunes, Amazon Music, Deezer, Google Play):
    More Information:
    Brilliant Classics Spotify:
    Brilliant Classics Facebook:

    This unusual collection is dedicated to a very popular style: minimal music. Over the years this has evolved from austere, almost strict repetition with tiny ‘movements’ to a more varied and free approach to material and technique.

    This set includes works for piano solo by most of the famous ‘minimal’ composers. Starting with initiator, if you will, Cage, and followed by the first generation entirely devoting itself to this style: Riley and Glass (Steve Reich did not write anything for solo piano). The next generation is represented by John Adams and Michael Nyman (his music for the film The Piano).

    Dutch pianist Jeroen van Veen is fascinated by minimal music. He was one of the initiators and participants of the highly successful complete recordings on 11 CD’s of Simeon ten Holt’s, a Dutch ‘minimalist’, complete works for multiple piano’s. On this solo album van Veen demonstrates his affinity with minimalism with great flair.

    The repertoire included here also comprises compositions by Satie, Friedrich Nietzsche and Arvo Pärt. There are two CD’s with music by the pianist himself and several recordings of minimal pieces by other present-day French, Belgian and Dutch composers.

    This attractive set will appeal to a wide audience and sheds light on the present state of minimalism

    00:00:00 Opening from ‘‘Glassworks’’ (Arr. van Veen)
    00:08:53 Metamorphosis One
    00:15:57 Metamorphosis Two
    00:22:51 Metamorphosis Three
    00:27:14 Metamorphosis Four
    00:33:08 Metamorphosis Five
    00:39:15 Mad Rush
    00:54:28 Wichita Vortex Sutra
    01:01:54 Opening from ‘‘Glassworks’’

    01:11:19 The Poet Acts
    01:14:54 Morning Passages
    01:20:20 Something She Has To Do
    01:23:51 I’m Going To Make A Cake
    01:27:36 An Unwelcome Friend
    01:32:08 Dead Things
    01:36:04 Why Does Someone Have To Die?
    01:39:41 Tearing Herself Away
    01:43:49 Escape!
    01:47:23 Choosing Life
    01:51:33 The Hours
    01:58:46 Truman Sleeps, from ‘‘The Truman Show’’
    02:00:57 Opening from ‘‘Glassworks’’
    02:07:07 Olympian

    02:11:06 Modern Love Waltz
    02:16:04 How Now
    02:41:13 ‘‘Trilogy’’ Sonata; I Knee Play No. 4 From Einstein On The Beach
    02:48:56 ‘‘Trilogy’’ Sonata; II Satyagraha, Conclusion, Act III
    02:57:46 ‘‘Trilogy’’ Sonata; III Dance, from Aknaten (Scene 3)

  • Pieter Hellendaal - Concerto Grosso Op. 3, No. 4

    12:56

    Pieter Hellendaal (1 April 1721 – 19 April 1799) was an Anglo-Dutch composer, organist and violinist. He was sometimes distinguished with the suffix The Elder, after the maturity of his musician son, Pieter Hellendaal the Younger.

    At age 30, he migrated to England where he lived for the last 48 of his 78 years. He was one of the most famous composers of Dutch origin in the 18th century.

    Grand Concerto Op. 3, No. 4

    Combattimento Amsterdam conducted by Jan Willem de Vriend

  • Joël Bons - Summer Dance

    4:12

    Joël Bons (1952)

    Summer Dance : for clarinet and piano (2013)

    Nieuw Ensemble:
    Arjan Kappers, clarinet
    John Snijders, piano


    Joël Bons is a Dutch composer. He studied guitar and composition at the Sweelinck Conservatory with Robert Heppener. In Freiburg he continued his studies with Brian Ferneyhough. Joël Bons co-founded the Nieuw Ensemble. For ten years he played the guitar in the ensemble and then became its artistic director. Bons has been responsible for virtually all programming and led the renowned Nieuw Ensemble’s yearly composers practicum. From 2002 Bons did artistic research in the Near East and Central Asia and founded the Atlas Ensemble, a unique chamber orchestra uniting musicians from Asia and Europe. He was awarded the Amsterdam Arts Award in 2005 for his work with the Atlas Ensemble. In 2008, Bons became the coordinator of the composition department of the Conservatory of Amsterdam. In 2010 the Atlas Ensemble premiered Bons' Cadenzas and in 2011 the Vancouver Inter-Cultural Orchestra commissioned Green Dragon. Early 2014 Bons’ Summer Dance for clarinet and piano was premiered at the Muziekgebouw aan ‘t IJ in Amsterdam; in the autumn of the same year followed Revolutions at the Cello Biennale 2016.

  • Willem Pijper - Sonatina No. 2

    4:29

    - Composer: Willem (Frederik Willem Johannes) Pijper (8 September 1894 -- 18 March 1947)
    - Performer: Hans Henkemans
    - Year of recording: 1969 (?)

    Sonatina No. 2, for piano, written in 1925.

    00:00 - Veloce
    01:28 - Molto sostenuto
    02:50 - Doppio movimento
    03:18 - Molto sostenuto

    Pijper's sonatina no. 2 and no. 3 are the best examples of sonatinas written by a Dutch composer, the sonatina was a style of composition that became very popular among Dutch composers after Pijper wrote his famous 3 sonatinas. They feature Pijper's polymeters, polytonality and germ-cell techniques, compositional tools which he really could develop in these sonatinas. His sonatina no. 2 and no.3 are full of creative and inspired writing, he manages to say so much in their short length, and it is the reason that these pieces are still being played in Dutch conservatories these days.

  • Reich - Six Pianos

    25:55

    The opening and ending in this video contains music by Luca Attanasio, Aria (album Penta). To purchase the album on iTunes:

    Composers in this playlist: Jeroen van Veen, John Adams, John Borstlap, John Cage, Philip Glass, Simeon ten Holt, Tom Johnson, Wim Mertens, Carlos Michans, Friedrich Nietzsche, Michael Nyman, Arvo Part, Terry Rilley, Eric Satie, Yann Tiersen, Jacob ter Veldhuis, Klaas de Vries.
    This unusual collection is dedicated to a very popular style: minimal music. Over the years this has evolved from austere, almost strict repetition with tiny ‘movements’ to a more varied and free approach to material and technique.
    This set includes works for piano solo by most of the famous ‘minimal’ composers. Starting with initiator, if you will, Cage, and followed by the first generation entirely devoting itself to this style: Riley and Glass (Steve Reich did not write anything for solo piano). The next generation is represented by John Adams and Michael Nyman (his music for the film The Piano).
    Dutch pianist Jeroen van Veen is fascinated by minimal music. He was one of the initiators and participants of the highly successful complete recordings on 11 CD’s of Simeon ten Holt’s, a Dutch ‘minimalist’, complete works for multiple piano’s. On this solo album van Veen demonstrates his affinity with minimalism with great flair.
    The repertoire included here also comprises compositions by Satie, Friedrich Nietzsche and Arvo Pärt. There are two CD’s with music by the pianist himself and several recordings of minimal pieces by other present-day French, Belgian and Dutch composers.
    This attractive set will appeal to a wide audience and sheds light on the present state of minimalism.

  • Wolfgang Wijdeveld - Dedication for two guitars

    4:04

    Wolfgang Wijdeveld (1910-1985)

    Dedication : voor twee gitaren (1980)

    The Anido Guitar Duo


    Wolfgang Wijdeveld was a Dutch composer. His father was the famous architect H.Th. Wijdeveld, his mother was the cellist Ellen Kohn and his grandmother the Polish pianist Ruscha Schönfeld, a pupil of Brahms. Wolfgang studied piano with Cornelius Berkhout and harmony with Willem van Warmelo. At the Amsterdam Conservatory of Music he studied piano with Willem Andriessen, theory with Sem Dresden and Anton Tierie and violin with Cor Kint. He also had singing lessons from Saar van Alphen and he studied composition for two years with Willem Pijper. At first Wijdeveld worked as a pianist and composer with the Yvonne Georgi ballet, Estelle Reed, and the Ballet of the Low Countries. He toured the Unites States in 1939 with the Yvonne Georgi Ballet. From 1940 till 1946 he was managing director of the Music School in Zwolle. From 1946 to 1976 he taught piano and (from 1962) methodology at the Utrecht Conservatory of Music and from 1966 to 1970 also at the Conservatory of Arnhem. He was a music critic at the daily Het Vrije Volk from 1956 till 1968. In 1962 and 1963 he gave concerts and seminars (together with his father) at 15 universities throughout North America. For many years he was chairman of the Amsterdam branch of the Royal Dutch Composers' Association. Wolfgang Wijdeveld wrote ballet music for one or two pianos with orchestra. Important works are: 'Symphonische Ouverture' for orchestra, songs, sonatas for piano, for violin and compositions for accordion and guitar.

  • Jan Mul, Concerto for Piano Duet and Orchestra

    17:54

    Jan Mul, Concerto for Piano Duet and Orchestra

    Das Kölner Klavier Duo (Elzbieta Kalvelage and Michael van Krücker)
    Bamberger Symphoniker
    Florian Merz, conductor

    Jan Mul (20 September 1911 – 30 December 1971) was a Dutch composer, mainly of church music. He was born in Haarlem and studied with Sem Dresden at the Amsterdam Conservatory; Mul orchestrated Dresden's opera Francois Villon after the composer's death.
    Mul died at Overveen, aged 60.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Traditional Dutch Music - Dutch Windmills

    3:10

    Traditional Dutch music about the beautiful country of The Netherlands. This music is called Dutch Windmills. We hope you enjoy listening to it!

    ***

    🎹 If you like this Dutch music, you might love this playlist:

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    ***

    Great picture is done by PixelAnarchy.



    #dutchmusic #netherlands #accordionmusic #accordions #holland


    ~ Music by Brandon & Derek Fiechter ~

  • ALBUM:WILLEM NOSKE VIOLINIST & COLLECTOR Pt.1 | Christian Friedrich Ruppe-Sonata for pianoforte

    15:08

    Christian Friedrich Ruppe (1753-1826) -Sonata for pianoforte with accompaniment of flute or violin and cello Op.
    1. Allegro con spirito. Adante cantabile, 3. Rondo, allegretto mosso
    (Pleyel Kwartet: Jolle de Wit dwarsfluit, Willem Noske viool, Herbert van de Velde
    altviool, Victor Bouguenon violoncello, Hans Schouwman pianoforte, Willem Noske viool, Carel van Leeuwen Boomkamp
    violoncello,.)

    Music of the Baroque is recorded on this CD; in a style that musical historians often call “Rococo”. However the Baroque and Rococo times had ended when the final composition on this CD was composed, around 1817 – the period of the Viennese Classics. Even this era had almost passed; Haydn and Mozart were dead, Beethoven was in his middle period of creativity. Yet
    the ideas of this piece, which was written in The Netherlands, still fit with the “Viennese” style: The three parts are relatively long; much longer than the other pieces on the CD. The first of the three has a considerable impact in the middle, whilst the two other parts show of a multitude of themes. Nevertheless at the same time the piece has something almost anachronistic. The piece is a sonata for piano to the accompaniment of violin or flute and cello, a beloved genre in the eighteenth century, although in 1817 this
    was already obsolete. This explains why the piano (in this recording an Erard – a grand piano from 1808 belonging to the Dutch Royal Family) has such a leading role. The violin only sporadically takes the lead or mimics a transition in the piano. Incidentally this is not something modern by the composer; these attempts of emancipation have always accompanied this genre.
    The composer Christian Friedrich Ruppe (Rüppe) (1753-1826) was a German who enrolled into the university of Leiden in 1773 where he discovered that he could make his career in music. Soon becoming known as a ‘musician’, he became chapel master in
    1790 at that academy and lecturer in theory of music in 1802. From 1788 onwards he was also the organist of the Lutheran church in Leiden. He also taught and directed amateur choirs. His chamber music is extremely interesting.

    Willem Henri Noske (1918-1995)
    was one of the most important Dutch violinists of the twentieth century. He started his career as a chills prodigy and performed on many famous stages world-wide. After the Second World War he developed more and more as a player of chamber music and moreover was leader of, among others, the Dutch Chamber Orchestra, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and The Hague Residentie Orchestra. Long before the authentic craze broke out Noske discovered unknown old masters and performed their music. Noske formed a number of ensembles to perform the music he rediscovered. With these ensembles countless performances were given in the Netherlands and tours made abroad. The unique sense of style and his powerful, warm tone led Willem Noske to grow into a much-loved violinist. Noske was not only a unique talent on the violin, but also an inspired and enthusiastic patriot. He felt that the quality of Dutch composers was seriously underestimated.

    Because of Willem Noske many names, amongst whom Willem de Fesch and Jan Brandts Buys, became well-known. He came to the conclusion that at least 800 works of Dutch origin had wrongfully disappeared under layers of dust. Noske considered the widely heard statement; “During the three centuries between Sweelinck and Diepenbrock in our country there wasn’t any music of any significance” to be a false cry based on a lack of knowledge of and, even worse, a lack of interest in the world of Dutch music. Noske could base his views solely on an exhaustive travel through the unknown.

    Noske began to form collections around a number of themes of which Dutch music ‘Musica Neerlandica’ and the violin library ‘Casa del Violino’ are the most important. All these collections are housed in the Dutch Musical Institute (NMI) in The Hague and comprise more than 80.000 titles of sheet music, first editions, letters and autographs of famous composers. Both the Musica Neerlandica and the Casa del Violino are regarded as the most important collections in their area of music anywhere in the world.

    Willem Noske himself was a modest man. According to him only the music was of importance and the performing artist should be subservient to the music. One of his beliefs was: “See what you can do for the music; not what the music can do for you.” Because of this, relatively few of his recordings have been preserved.

    In the aftermath of Noske’s discoveries a revolution was unleashed in the practice ofperforming Baroque music because the nineteenth century’s late romantic interpretation would have irredeemably polluted the authentic Baroque approach. However, Noske was far from an unthinking follower of the prevailing romantic practice of performing.

    Hans Roskam, translation by Lucille Brakefield

  • Marijn Simons - Concerto comique

    22:23

    Marijn Simons (1982)

    Concerto comique : pour trombone et orchestre, Op. 17 (2000)

    1. Air cocasse (Fernandel)
    2. Humour caché (Jacques Tati)
    3. Mimique élastique (Louis de Funès)

    Jaques Mauger, trombone
    Orchestra: Nederlands Kamerorkest
    Conductor: Micha Hamel

    dedicated to Jacques Mauger


    Program note (English): On a concert tour in September 1999 Marijn Simons met the well-known French trombonist Jacques Mauger in Palermo. Both had come to Sicily at the invitation of the Orchestra Sinfonia Siciliana, Jacques appearing as soloist in the trombone concerto by Tomasi, Marijn in the second violin concerto by Darius Milhaud. Marijn had with him the almost finished score of the piano concert Concerto d'un bon Esprit commissioned by Jean-Bernard Pommier, which he was then working on. The two musicians became friends and Jacques was so enthusiastic about Marijn's work that he asked him to compose a trombone concerto. This commission was later spontaneously taken over by the Dutch Fund for the Creation of Music. A large part of the repertoire for trombone and orchestra easily tends to a sort of brass band orchestration, which Marijn wanted to avoid. His idea was to compose a really symphonic piece with the air of a great romantic cello concerto. The film comedians Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy were the inspiration for the now famous Capriccio for Stan & Ollie from 1996. This cinematographic source of inspiration turns out to be not nearly exhausted as evidenced by the Concerto Comique. The first part, air cocasse (funny face) is subtitled Fernandel. The character parts of this French master actor are interwoven in this part. Le boulanger de Valorque and the many Don Camillo films appealed to Marijn's musical imagination. The obstinacy, the bustle, the unforgettably ludicrous facial expressions and also the occasional fist fights were transposed into a stirring through composed opening part. After a fierce scuffle between soloist and orchestra the accordion - representing the French sound very prominently - comes in as a soothing third party. It brings peace and begins the second part with a low long sounding octave (e-e). Humour caché (quiet, hidden humor) is overflowing with melancholy and is dedicated to Jacques Tati. To compare this undisputed master of quiet humor with Charlie Chaplin is obvious, but, however strange thismay sound, Marijn rather thought of a comparison with Mozart, one eye laughing, the other crying. Tati's acting is perhaps funniest in L' école des facteurs. He is more poetical in the satiric part of Monsieur Hulot in Oscar-winning Mon Oncle (1958), a film which inspires the harmonic structure of the almost transcendent middle part. Concerto Comique is fully through composed. The transition to the third part, inspired by Louis de Funès, mimique élastique, is made again by the accordion (octave e, with a diminuendo to silence). Then we hear an attacca start of the bongos and congas with fast spinning sixteenth notes, giving the final part a breathtaking ecstatic speed. In his unequalled way Louis de Funès is playing an egocentric little man who is never at rest. Think of Le gendarme de Saint Tropez and Les aventures de rabbi Jacob. There's no holding the orchestra and the trombone any more. - Aloys Simons

    Marijn Simons is a Dutch composer, violinist and conductor. He studied violin with Prof. Saschko Gawriloff, composition with Daan Manneke and James MacMillan and conducting with Ed Spanjaard, Jean- Bernard Pommier and Prof. Kenneth Kiesler. Marijn Simons is Conductor and Artistic Director of the Simons Ensemble. Since 2012 he is Assistant Conductor at the Opernfestspiele in Heidenheim. Simons was Composer-in-Residence at the Orlando Festival, Delft Chamber Music Festival, Cabrillo Festival and the Zeitgenossen festival. He has received the Philip Morris Arts Prize, Limburg Culture Award, Wim Bary Perspective Award and his composition ‘The City of the Soul‘ has been awarded Best Dutch Choral Composition in 2001.

  • Jan Ingenhoven - Duo for violin and clarinet

    3:37

    Jan Ingenhoven (1876-1951)

    Duo : voor viool en klarinet (1925)

    Julija Hartig, violin
    Frank van den Brink, clarinet


    Jan Ingenhoven was a Dutch composer and conductor. He studied with Brandts Buys in Rotterdam and later with Mottl in Munich, where he conducted the Munich Madrigal Society from 1909 to 1912. This was a famous ensemble of soloists which made many concert tours under his direction. By conducting the Munich Orchestra Association and organizing music festivals he introduced a great deal of contemporary Dutch and French music into Germany. In 1913 Ingenhoven retired as a performing artist to devote himself primarily to composition. During World War I he resided in Switzerland and Paris. After 1930 he retired as a composer and returned to the Netherlands.
    Ingenhoven's preferred genres changed over time. During his first period in Munich he wrote orchestral works alongside pieces for chorus, vocal quartet and solo voice; before World War I he devoted himself to string quartets and from then until 1918 he composed chamber music for various trio combinations. In the years around 1920 he wrote the sonatas for violin and for cello and the final period was taken up with works for solo instruments within small ensembles.
    Ingenhoven inherited certain stylistic elements from 16th-century music. His early works were always conceived polyphonically. Paired duets, imitation and polyrhythm are outstanding characteristics, especially in the vocal works from the Munich period. His song 'Nous n'irons plus au bois' (1909) from the 4 quatuors à voix mixtes, which Ingenhoven claimed to be the first atonal vocal work by a Dutch composer, is a brilliant example of this style.
    In the chamber works Ingenhoven's style became even more exclusive through a combination of the polyphonic elements and a new homophonic approach, with tonally indefinite chords, subtle dynamics and delicate timbre. He devised cantilena-like melodies, quasi-improvised as if he wanted to create Jugendstil in music. Although he used cellular motivic technique, the structure of his works always tends towards symmetry.

  • Jan Koetsier, Concerto for trumpet, trombone and orchestra

    19:36

    Jan Koetsier, Concerto for trumpet, trombone and orchestra

    1. Allegro con slanclo
    2. Andante molto sostenuto - Adagio
    3. Allegro giocoso
    4. Allegro molto

    John Wilbraham, trumpet
    Armin Rosin, trombone
    Nürnberg Symphoniker
    Uri Segal, conductor

    Jan Koetsier was a Dutch conductor and composer. In 1950, Koetsier became the first Kapellmeister (conductor) of the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra. He was chef conductor of this orchestra till 1966 together with Eugen Jochum and Rafael Kubelik.

    The music on my channel is meant to introduce a large audience to music by unknown classical composers and unknown classical music by famous composers in the music period of about 1870 till about 1970.
    The program presents works by relatively unknown composers and unknown music by well-known composers and has no commercial purposes.
    Tens of thousands of people around the world learn about unknown music through our channel (educational task) and unite the people from the many countries who give their comments and reactions. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to YouTube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

  • Brahms: Symphonies Complete | Jaap van Zweden

    2:41:28

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    Composer: Johannes Brahms
    Artists: Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra, Radio Filharmonisch Orkest, Jaap van Zweden (conductor)

    Amongst the standard performances for this repertoire, here conducted by Jaap van Zweden, the current music director of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Great performances by two of the best Dutch orchestras, who were under Jaap his artistic leadership for years. This mainstream repertoire for all classical music lovers should be in your library.
    A must-have for Brahms addicts.Van Zweden, with his famous string background shows his skills and brings us a very balanced performance.

    Tracklist:

    00:00:00 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: I. Un poco sostenuto – Allegro – Meno allegro
    00:12:33 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: II. Andante sostenuto
    00:21:06 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso
    00:25:53 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68: IV. Adagio – Più andante – Allegro non troppo ma con brio – Più allegro
    00:43:05 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D, Op. 73: I. Allegro non troppo
    01:04:06 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D, Op. 73: II. Adagio non troppo
    01:13:58 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D, Op. 73: III. Allegretto grazioso
    01:19:28 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D, Op. 73: IV. Allegro con spirit
    01:29:02 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F, Op. 90: I. Allegro con brio – un poco sostenuto – Tempo I
    01:38:55 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F, Op. 90: II. Andante
    01:47:21 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F, Op. 90: III. Poco allegretto
    01:53:20 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F, Op. 90: IV. Allegro – un poco sostenuto
    02:02:27 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E-Minor, Op. 98: I. Allegro non troppo
    02:15:02 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E-Minor, Op. 98: II. Andante moderato
    02:25:45 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E-Minor, Op. 98: III. Allegro giocoso
    02:31:50 Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E-Minor, Op. 98: IV. Allegro energico e passionato – Più allegro

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  • Pieter Hellendaal - Concerto Grosso Op. 3, No. 3

    10:50

    Pieter Hellendaal (1 April 1721 – 19 April 1799) was an Anglo-Dutch composer, organist and violinist. He was sometimes distinguished with the suffix The Elder, after the maturity of his musician son, Pieter Hellendaal the Younger.

    At age 30, he migrated to England where he lived for the last 48 of his 78 years. He was one of the most famous composers of Dutch origin in the 18th century.

    Grand Concerto Op. 3, No. 3

    Combattimento Amsterdam conducted by Jan Willem de Vriend

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