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Playlist of List of Croatian composers

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  • Petar Bergamo - Quartetto darchi

    24:39

    Izvođači / Performed by:
    Gudački kvartet Klima / Klima String Quartet

    Petar Bergamo: Quartetto d'archi

    I Grave. Allegro con rigore
    II Adagio (Arco per archi) 07:03
    III Tempo d'un minuetto 15:32
    IV Rondo (Allegro giocoso) 19:21

    Snimka je dostupna na autorskom CD-u s djelima Petra Bergama iz serije Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji, izdanje Cantusa iz 2010. / This track is available on CD with music by Petar Bergamo released by Cantus in 2010, Croatian Contemporary Composers series

    Popis djela Petra Bergama / List of works by this author:


    Get CD:

  • x
  • Arcangelo Corelli: Concerto in D Major Op. 6 No. 4, complete. Voices of Music; original instruments

    9:36

    The Concerto in D Major, Op. 6 No. 4, of Arcangelo Corelli,, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music.
    Adagio 0:00 Allegro 0:21 Adagio 3:29 Vivace 5:04 Allegro & Coda 6:08
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more
    videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website, Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    300 years ago, Corelli's concertos, Op. 6, were published in 1714 in Amsterdam: these works dramatically affected the style of the baroque concerto for the next generation of composers. The reception of this magnificent collection, one of the crown jewels of baroque instrumental music, is in no small part due to the music publishing boom which began around 1690, as well as Corelli's signature set of violin sonatas, Opus 5, of which as Michael Talbot notes at least 42 editions had appeared by 1800. The wide availability of Corelli's works created an international Corellian style. The concertos are written in an expanded trio sonata style, in which the two solo violins and cello form a small ensemble within the larger tutti framework. The fourth concerto is noteworthy for its suave and serene introduction, the gracefulness of the dance movement, the exceptionally well-balanced counterpoint and harmony, and the furious concluding coda which flows out of the second ending of the last movement.
    HD Video from the Voices of Music Lamentations of Jeremiah concert, April, 2014. In the year 1702, the Avvisi di Roma noted that for a performance during Holy Week of Scarlatti's Lamentations, the orchestra also played a superb concerto for basses, violones, violins and violas of Arcangelo (Griffin, The Late Baroque Serenata). For the 300th anniversary of Corelli's concertos, we will be releasing on video selections from Corelli's Opus 6 as well as Handel's Opus 6.

    Voices of Music
    David Tayler & Hanneke van Proosdij, directors
    Kati Kyme & Elizabeth Blumenstock
    solo baroque violins
    Shirley Edith Hunt, solo baroque cello
    Gabrielle Wunsch & Maxine Nemerovski
    ripieno baroque violins
    Lisa Grodin, baroque viola
    Farley Pearce, violone
    Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ
    David Tayler, archlute


    #Corelli #ConcertoGrosso

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  • Massimo Savić - Plavi anđeo

    2:58

    Massimo Savić - Plavi anđeo (Jugovizija 1989)
    Music: Zrinko Tutić.
    Lyrics: Zrinko Tutić / Miroslav Drljača Rus.
    Arrangement: Krešimir Klemenčić.
    Audio (C) Jugoton / RTV Zagreb 1989

    Massimo's second Eurovision attempt, and another second place. The Yugoslav Final for Eurovision was held at the Velika Sala SNP in Novi Sad on March 4th, hosted by Dina Čolić and Boško Negovanović. The winning song was chosen from a selection of 16 songs, by the votes of 8 regional juries. Each TV studio had chosen 1 song that entered straight into the competition and submitted few more songs from which the rest 8 songs were chosen.

    Plavi anđeo was released on Massimo's album Muzika za tebe (1989).

    Massimo Savić is a Croatian pop singer. He first became popular with his band Dorian Gray (1982-1986) with whom he released two albums for Jugoton (Sjaj u tami (1983),
    Za tvoje oči (1985)). He started his solo career at Mesam Music Festival 1986, but the turning point was his appearance at the Yugoslav pre-selection for Eurovision 1987, where he was second with Samo jedan dan, the song that will become a smash hit in all the countries of former Yugoslavia, and would be the song of the year at the discography Grand Prix awards at Mesam 1987, and himself a winner of the best male singer award. He will try his luck at Yugoslav Eurovision pre-sellections two more times - Plavi anđeo (1989, 2nd again), Pjesma za tebe (1990, 8th), and few more times at the Croatian Dora, but never made it to the Euro-stage. He will come back in competition in Belgrade at Mesam in 1988 with Odmori se na mojim rukama, when he wins all the major awards (1st prize of the Yugoslav radio stations, 1st prize of the Jury and the Award for the best act by the Yugoslav Union of Composers - SOKOJ, and again in 1990 with Ovisan o tvoje ljubavi (2nd prize of the audience, 2nd prize of the Jury and the award for best arrangement).

    He has released the following albums as a soloist: Stranac u noći (1987), Riječi čarobne (1988), Muzika za tebe (1989), Zemlja plesa (1990), Elements (1992), Benzina (1995), Massimo (2003), Vještina (2004), Zlatna kolekcija (2004), Apsolutno Uživo Klub Aquarius (2005), Vještina 2 (2006), Sunce se ponovo rađa (2008), Massimo Sings Sinatra (2010), Dodirni me slučajno (2011), Tvornica Kulture, Zagreb 14./15. Veljače 2012 (Mini Album, 2012). He won five Porin awards for best male vocal performance, 2004-2007 and 2012.

    More on his official sites:





  • Jovan Paču - Rapsodija br. 5

    4:20

    Composer: Jovan Paču (1847-1902)

    Performed by Dubravka Jovičić, piano.

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  • Music of Scotland: Lochaber, performed by Voices of Music

    4:30

    Hi everyone~! Please consider a donation, and we will make more videos like this one :)
    The composer Francesco Barsanti arranged many of the most beautiful of the 17th century Scottish fiddle tunes and printed them in Edinburgh in 1742. Here is the song Lochaber, performed on original instruments: Our new audiophile Scottish Album is now available on iTunes
    video from the Great Artists series, from the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music in San Francisco, February, 2014.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more

    videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from

    individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit

    our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about

    everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:


    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the

    original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to

    recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or

    violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they

    different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and

    players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning.

    Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were

    often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and

    with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which

    we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to

    more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    The musicians (left to right)
    Hanneke van Proosdij, voice flute (recorder)
    Carla Moore, baroque violin
    Elisabeth Reed, viola da gamba
    Rodney Gehrke, baroque organ
    Peter Maund, frame drum
    Cheryl Ann Fulton, baroque triple harp
    David Tayler, archlute
    Lochaber arranged by the musicians of Voices of Music

    Francesco Barsanti came to London in 1714, where he performed in the London orchestras. He married a Scotswoman and got to know the folk music of the North, which resulted in some of the most beautiful settings of these tunes.

    Lochaber, in the north-west of Scotland, is a wild and rugged place of mountain and moorland, running from the Great Glen to Knoydart on the coast. There are versions of this tune called King James March to Ireland dating from the 17th century. It is known in Ireland as Limerick's Lament.
    #Outlander

  • Falconieri: La Folia

    4:08

    Andrea Falconieri's setting of the La Folia dance, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. HD video from the Art of the Recorder concert, February, 2014.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more

    videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from

    individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit

    our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about

    everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:


    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the

    original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to

    recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or

    violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they

    different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and

    players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning.

    Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were

    often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and

    with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which

    we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to

    more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    The original title reads Folias Echa Para Mi Señora Doña Tarolilla De Carallenos (Primo libro di canzone, Naples, Paolini & Ricci, 1650). The composition uses the technique of wandering variation, pioneered by Monteverdi and others, in which the composer creates musical episodes in the form of brief excursions from the standard variation pattern. Falconieri also adds a brief adagio to provide a moment of harmonic and rhythmic contrast before the final variations.
    The continuo group is here represented by the viola da gamba, organ, archlute and triple harp: in the 17th century it was not unusual to have a rich and varied continuo group; each player improvises a part that creates a unique voice in the texture as well as blends together to form a complete accompaniment.
    Featuring Hanneke van Proosdij, recorder
    Carla Moore, baroque violin
    Elisabeth Reed, viola da gamba
    Rodney Gehrke, baroque organ
    Peter Maund, percussion
    Cheryl Ann Fulton, triple harp
    David Tayler, baroque guitar

  • x
  • Sevdah

    1:6:00

    Documentary about sevdalinka, so called Bosnian blues, with English subtitles.
    Sevdalinka (pronounced [seʋdǎliːŋka]) is a traditional genre of folk music from Bosnia and Herzegovina.
    Sevdalinka belongs to the Bosniak culture, but is also popular across the ex-Yugoslavia region, especially in Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia.

    The actual composers of many sevdalinkas are unknown.

    In musical sense, sevdalinka is characterized by a slow or moderate tempo and rich harmony, leaving a melancholic feeling with the listener. Sevdalinka songs are very elaborate, emotionally charged and are traditionally sung with passion and fervor. The combination of Oriental, European and Sephardic elements make this type of music stand out among other types of folk music from the Balkans. The singer will often impose the rhythm and tempo of the song, both of which can vary throughout the song. Traditionally, sevdalinkas are women's songs, most addressing the issue of love and longing, unfulfilled and unfortunate love, some touch on a woman's physical desire for her loved one, and some have comic elements. Currently they are often performed by men as well. Traditionally, they were played without any instruments, hence the elaborate harmony. Modern interpretations are followed by a small orchestra containing accordion (the most prominent), violin, nylon-string guitars and/or other string instruments (occasionally), flute or clarinet (occasionally), upright bass, snare drum. In between the verses, an accordion or violin solo can almost always be heard.

    The origins of sevdalinka are not known for certain, though it is known to date from sometime after the arrival of the Ottomans in medieval Balkans. The word itself comes from the Turkish sevda which derives from the Arabic word sawda (meaning black and also black bile, which in earlier times was used by doctors to denote a substance purported to control human feelings and emotions. But in Turkish sevda doesn't mean black; it means love, caressing. That word was brought to Bosnia by the Ottomans. Today it is a richly evocative Bosnian word meaning love, caressing, longing (for loved one), and the main theme of sevdalinka lyrics. Thus the people of Bosnia employ the words sevdalinka and sevdah interchangeably as the name of this music, although the word sevdah can also be used in other meanings. It is possible that the central term in Portuguese Fado saudade is of the same origin.

    In the early 19th century, Bosniak poetess Umihana Čuvidina contributed much to the development of modern sevdalinka with her poems about her lost love, which she sang.

  • Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G Major BWV 1049, complete; Voices of Music 4K UHD

    16:17

    Hi everyone~! Please consider a donation, and we will make more videos like this one :)
    The world premiere of J. S. Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 4, performed on original instruments.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.

    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.

    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:

    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.

    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both 

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.

    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Carla Moore, baroque violin solo; Hanneke van Proosdij & Andrew Levy, recorders & echo flutes. Performance and 4K UHD Video by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music.
    In March of 1721, Johann Sebastian Bach carefully inked six of his best concertos into a book for the Margrave of Brandenburg, Christian Ludwig. The original title, Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments is now known as the Brandenburg Concertos in English or Brandenburgische Konzerte in German.
    These six concertos represent the summa of chamber music in the high baroque period: for the fourth concerto (BWV 1049), Bach chose the unique and imaginative texture of baroque violin and “echo flutes” (a type of baroque recorder) for his soloists.
    In his autograph manuscript of Brandenburg 4 (BWV 1049), Bach writes the title as follows:
    Concerto 4to à Violino Principale, due Fiauti d'Echo, due Violini, una Viola è Violone in Ripieno, Violoncello è Continuo. For our video, we use the “echo flutes” for the slow movement, then break them apart for the first and third movements. The outside movements feature exceptionally virtuosic writing for the violin, with extended passagework spanning the entire range of the instrument. For his fourth concerto in the set of Brandenburgs, Bach is especially careful with the orchestration: this creates space for the recorder sound to breathe; in addition, his compositional style flows with sparkle and wit.
    The fourth Brandenburg concerto is unusual in that Bach specifically calls for echo flutes, or fiauti d'echo. For many years musicologists have debated what an echo flute exactly is, and have also uncovered a great deal of historical detail, but the work is usually performed with two alto recorders.
    YouTube now has a limit on the length of the description text; more information about the echo flutes and this recording here:

    #Bach #BrandenburgConcerto

  • John Dowland: Flow my tears ; Phoebe Jevtovic Rosquist, soprano & David Tayler, lute

    4:38

    Hey everyone~! Please consider a donation,
    and we will make more videos like this one :)
    Dowland's signature song, Flow my tears, fall from your springs, performed by Phoebe Jevtovic Rosquist, soprano, and David Tayler, archlute.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.

    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.

    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:

    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.

    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both 

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.

    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Live, HD video from the Saturday Night at the Movies concert presented by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music, January, 2014, in San Francisco.
    Dowland's song, also know as Lachrimae, which means tears in Latin, was the most famous English song of the early 17th century and was well-known throughout Europe--many composers wrote variations on Dowland's theme and harmonies. The first four notes of the melody form the bass part for Dowland's song, I saw my lady weep, both works were published in the Second book of Ayres (London, 1600).
    The poem is the subject of many articles. My own view is that night's black bird refers to the Greek goddess Nyx, the black-winged goddess of the night and one of the protogenoi (first-born elemental gods). In one creation myth, Nyx was born from Chaos, and her symbols were the bird and shadows--the shadow theme appears at the end of the poem as well as in Dowland's other works. According to the philosophy of the time, tears were also a symbol of lost hope (are my hopes since hope is gone), and this sentiment is described by Thomas Hobbes in 1658, even as the idea of humours was falling out of favor.

    Once a year, Voices of Music invites early music groups to participate in a day of filming in San Francisco. You provide the music, we provide the cameras, and we all watch the magic.
    Visit us on the web at
    #Dowland #Lachrimae

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  • Izolda & Vlado - Ciao amore

    3:02

    Izolda i Vlado - Ljubavna priča br. 1 (Jugovizija 1984)
    (Original studio version of Ciao amore)
    Music: Slobodan Bučevac.
    Lyrics: Milan Perić.
    Arrangement: Mato Došen.
    Audio (c) RTV Titograd 1984

    This is the studio recording of the version of the song as performed at the Yugoslav finals for the Eurovision Song Contest 1984. Jugovizija 84 was held on March 23rd at the Universal Hall in Skopje, hosted by Liljana Krsteva and Blagoja Krstevski. The winning song was chosen from a selection of 16 songs, by the votes of 8 regional juries. Each TV studio competed with 2 songs. Ljubavna priča br. 1 won the national contest, It was later renamed Ciao amore, the bridge was changed and the arrangement was slightly altered. Furthermore, bells were added to the arrangement for the performance in Luxemburg. However, that didn't help a lot, nor Izolda's topless bit in the preview video. Ciao amore finished second last in Luxemburg.

    But this is not the first version of the song. Here is the story. At that time all authors could submit their songs only to the TV Studio in the republic of their residence. Also, the deadline for submission was different to each TV Studio. The first version of Ciao amore was called Moja najmilija and it was submitted to TV Zagreb with Đorđe Novković and Zrinko Tutić credited as authors. Đorđe Novković also submitted Oh, ne, cherie (Rendez-vous) and Mary Ann (Alen Slavica). Non of his songs were accepted and he re-submitted them to the studios that were still running the concours. Those three songs were accpted at Titograd, Ljubljana and Priština, respectively, but with authors from those Republics credited. Novković was later added on the list of authors on the album releases on Oh, ne, cherie and Mary Ann, but not to Ciao amore who was credited to Slobodan Bučevac and Milan Perić, probably due to legal reasons. After the competition TV Zagreb broadcasted a special show in which some of their rejects were presented. Among them were: Izolda i Vlado - Moja najmilija (Ciao amore), Rendez-vous - Oh, ne, cherie, Alen Slavica - Mary Ann, Darko Domijan - Lucille (all 4 by Novković), Novi Fosili - Valentino i Renato...

    Vlado Kalember is a Croatian pop singer, famous for his recognisable, husky voice. In the 1970s, he was the vocalist of the popular pop band Srebrna Krila. After leaving the band, he continued with a solo career. In 1984, together with Izolda Barudžija, he represented Yugoslavia at the Eurovision Song Contest. (CIao Amore). He was also a member of 4 Asa. He is married to the cellist Ana Rucner. His biggest successes are Vino na usnama, Ja nisam kockar, Ana, Lili, Otkad si otišla, Ja odavde, ona s juga, Odoh u mornare...

    Izolda Barudžija is a singer from former Yugoslavia born in Split. She was a member of the Belgrade vocal group Pop Polifonija, from which the trio Aska was extracted, They became the Yugoslav enrants to the Eurovision Song Contest 1982 (Halo, halo). In 1983, she and her sister Eleonora were Daniel Popović's backing vocals/dancers. Their song Julie won the 4th place and became a big hit. In a third year in a row, in 1984, she and Vlado Kalember sung Ciao Amore at the Eurovision Song Contest, in Luxemburg. The preview video for Ciao Amore was not broadcast on Turkish state television because Barudžija appeared bathing topless. However, they got their highest votes from Turkey (8 points). Izolda participated at Opatija 1984 just before she won Jugovizija 84 and at Split 84. Izolda and Vlado sang at a music festival in Bodrum, Turkey in the summer of that year.

    From 1995 Izolda started singing in duet with her sister Eleonora and together they had few festival appearances, the most memorable was Mesam 1986, with Opet Beograd, which won the Jury Award and the SOKOJ (Union of Yugoslav Composers) Award, and as far as i remember, their last appearance together was at the Eurovision Finals of scattered Yugoslavia in 1992.

    Izolda married the Serbian musician Zlatko Manojlović and together they released an album under the name Vox. Manojlović wrote the music, while the lyrics were written by both of them. In 1998, they released the another Vox album, with some songs featuring Manojlović playing sitar.

  • Johann Gottlieb Janitsch - Oboe Quartet in g

    19:39

    ★ Follow music ►

    Composer: Johann Gottlieb Janitsch (1708-1763)
    Work: Oboe Quartet in g
    Performers: Haruna Kinugasa (oboe); Anne Jagusch (violin); Lea Strecker (viola); Haruko Onoda (cello); Mikhail Yarzhembovskiya (harpsichord)

    Engraving: Matthäus Merian (1593-1650) - Schweidnitz (c.1650)
    Image in high resolution:
    Engraving: Georg Balthasar Probst (1732-1801) - Gezicht op het Zeughaus te Berlijn
    Image in high resolution:

    Further info:
    Listen free:

    ---

    Johann Gottlieb Janitsch [Janitzch, Janitsh]
    (Schweidnitz [now Swidnica], 19 June 1708 - Berlin, 1763)

    Silesian composer and bass viol player. After attending the Dreifaltigkeitsschule at Schweidnitz, he went to Breslau to continue his musical studies under the guidance of the local court musicians. In 1729 he registered as a law student at the University of Frankfurt an der Oder. During his four-year stay there he took an active part in the city’s musical life: he provided music for various royal and civic occasions and on 14 November 1729 directed a performance of one of his serenades before Friedrich Wilhelm I; two years later he gave a similar concert before Crown Prince Frederick (later Frederick the Great). In 1733 Janitsch left the university and became secretary to Franz Wilhelm von Happe, an important minister of state. In 1736 he was called to Ruppin as a member of Prince Frederick’s personal orchestra. Later that year the prince’s establishment moved to Rheinsberg and there Janitsch inaugurated his famous ‘Friday Academies’. On Frederick’s accession in 1740 Janitsch was appointed ‘contraviolinist’ in the reconstituted orchestra; he remained in Berlin until his death. Other duties at Frederick’s court involved the direction and composition of music for the court balls (held annually from 1743) and some work with the opera chorus. The ‘Friday Academies’ continued to flourish at Janitsch’s house in Berlin; performers included enthusiasts from the court orchestra and many other musicians, both professional and amateur. These weekly concerts had an excellent reputation and inspired many similar undertakings, notably C.F. Schale’s ‘Monday Assembly’ and J.F. Agricola’s ‘Saturday Concerts’.

    Janitsch was much respected by his contemporaries. At Frankfurt he had received several commissions for birthday, wedding and funeral music, and there was also demand for his compositions in Berlin. Works commissioned during the Berlin period include a Te Deum for the laying of the foundation stone of St Hedwig’s Basilica (1748), and festive music for the coronation of King Adolf Frederik of Sweden (1751). The latter was written at the request of Princess Amalia, but was probably not performed during the actual celebrations. Janitsch was particularly renowned for his quartets (for three melody instruments and continuo), which Johann Wilhelm Hertel described as the ‘best models’ of their kind. Certainly they show a mastery of contrapuntal technique and an awareness of texture and timbre. The most appealing aspect is the rich variety of instrumentations, including unusual sonorities like oboe d’amore and viola pomposa. Janitsch’s instrumental music is in the galant style. The writing is sometimes rather florid, in the manner of J.G. Graun. Three of Janitsch’s quartets were published by Winter in Berlin (1760), and a few other pieces by him, including harpsichord sonatas, organ sonatas, and lieder appeared in contemporary collections. It appears likely that Janitsch autographs were in the private collection of Sara Levy, which passed to the Berlin Singakademie after her death. The recent discovery of Singakademie holdings in the Ukraine may bring the autographs to light.

  • Lascia chio pianga ; Voices of Music with Kirsten Blaise, soprano

    5:34

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    and we will make more videos like this one :)
    Handel's signature aria from his Opera Rinaldo HWV 7 (1711), performed on original instruments by Voices of Music, with soprano Kirsten Blaise.
    Voices of Music FAQ
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    A. Donate here: and we will make more

    videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from

    individual donors.
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    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit

    our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about

    everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:


    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the

    original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to

    recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or

    violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they

    different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and

    players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning.

    Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were

    often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and

    with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which

    we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to

    more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Handel reworked one of his best arias from Il trionfo del tempo (1707) for Rinaldo, his first London opera, and the first Italian opera specifically composed for the London theatres.

    Lascia ch'io pianga
    mia cruda sorte,
    e che sospiri la libertà.
    Il duolo infranga queste ritorte
    de' miei martiri sol per pietà.

    Let me weep
    over my cruel fate,
    and sigh for freedom.
    Let my sorrow break the chains
    of my suffering, out of pity.

    The Musicians (left to right, back to front)
    Kati Kyme, baroque violin
    Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin
    Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin
    Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin
    Lisa Grodin, baroque viola
    Farley Pearce, violone
    Shirley Edith Hunt, baroque cello
    David Tayler, archlute
    Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ
    And the fabulous Kirsten Blaise, soprano
    Voices of Music directed by Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler

    #Handel #HandelAria #HandelOpera

  • Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major, BWV 1048: Complete 4K UHD; Voices of Music

    11:43

    For the first time in 4K Ultra High Definition video, Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G Major (BWV 1048), complete, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. I. (Allegro) 0:00 II. Adagio 5:34 III. Allegro 5:45
    Voices of Music FAQ
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    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.

    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:

    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    In March of 1721, Johann Sebastian Bach carefully inked six of his best concertos into a book for the Margrave of Brandenburg, Christian Ludwig. The original title, Six Concerts à plusieurs instruments is now known as the Brandenburg Concertos in English or Brandenburgische Konzerte in German.
    These six concertos represent the summa of chamber music in the high baroque period, and the third concerto (BWV 1048) is noted for its rich texture of three violins, three violas and three cellos, with a continuo part for the harpsichord and violone. The original title is as follows: Concerto 3zo [terzo] a tre Violini, tre Viole, è tre Violoncelli col Basso per il Cembalo. On the continuo part, Bach has written Violone & Cembalo, and this is how it is performed in the video, just as it is indicated in the original manuscript.
    This concerto is part of the Voices of Music Great Works project. A Creative Commons edition of the score, based on the composer's manuscript, will be published to accompany the complete recording, and the recording will be available worldwide on Blu-Ray and CD, and for free on MP3 and high-definition, 24 bit FLAC files.

    Voices of Music
    Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors
    #Bach #BrandenburgConcerto #cellosdeservemorerecognition

  • Balkan Gypsy Music

    31:32

    Romani music or Gipsy music is the music of the Romani people, who have their origins in northern India, but today live mostly in Europe. Historically nomadic, though now largely settled, the Romani people have long acted as entertainers and tradesmen. In many of the places Romanies live they have become known as musicians. The wide distances travelled have introduced a multitude of influences of Byzantine, Greek, Arabic, Indian, Persian, Turkish, Slavic, Romanian, German, Dutch, French, Spanish and even Jewish musical forms. It is difficult to define the parameters of a unified Romani musical style, as there are many differences in melodic, harmonic, rhythmic and formal structures from region to region. Lyrics to Romani songs are often sung in one or more dialects of the Romani language, and dance frequently accompanies Romani music performance.

    The quintessentially Spanish flamenco is to a very large extent the music (and dance, or indeed the culture) of the Romani people of Andalusia. Apart from Romani music for local use, in Eastern Europe a separate Romani music originated for entertainment at parties and celebrations. This music drew its themes from Hungarian, Romanian, Russian and other sources. Later on it gained popularity in Western Europe, where many Romani orchestras were active, playing sophisticated melodies of East European origin. Most Romani music is based on the folk music of the countries where the Romani went through or settled. Local music is adopted and performed – usually instrumental – and, slowly, it is transformed into Romani styles, which are usually more complex than the original styles. In its turn, Romani music has greatly influenced the local music.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Massimo Savic - Stranac u noci

    3:21

    Massimo Savić - Stranac u noći (Video, 1987)
    Music:Zrinko Tutić.
    Lyrics: Zrinko Tutić / Marina Tucaković.
    Arrangement: Mato Došen.
    Audio (c) Jugoton 1987
    Video (c) TV Skopje (MRT) 1987

    Performance in the TV Show Video Metronom of TV Skopje (Macedonian TV) of Massimo Savić's titles song of his first solo album Stranac u noći. It is also released as a vinzl single and included on his Best of compilations Sve najbolje (1995) and Zlatna kolekcija (2004), as well on Massimo's live albums. He recorded a new version of the song in duet with Nina Badrić, which can be found on his Vještina (2004) album. Stranac u noći is also on the track list on many various artists compilations.

    Massimo Savić is a Croatian pop singer. He first became popular with his band Dorian Gray (1982-1986) with whom he released two albums for Jugoton (Sjaj u tami (1983),
    Za tvoje oči (1985)). He started his solo career at Mesam Music Festival 1986, but the turning point was his appearance at the Yugoslav pre-selection for Eurovision 1987, where he was second with Samo jedan dan, the song that will become a smash hit in all the countries of former Yugoslavia, and would be the song of the year at the discography Grand Prix awards at Mesam 1987, and himself a winner of the best male singer award. He will try his luck at Yugoslav Eurovision pre-sellections two more times - Plavi anđeo (1989, 2nd again), Pjesma za tebe (1990, 8th), and few more times at the Croatian Dora, but never made it to the Euro-stage. He will come back in competition in Belgrade at Mesam in 1988 with Odmori se na mojim rukama, when he wins all the major awards (1st prize of the Yugoslav radio stations, 1st prize of the Jury and the Award for the best act by the Yugoslav Union of Composers - SOKOJ, and again in 1990 with Ovisan o tvoje ljubavi (2nd prize of the audience, 2nd prize of the Jury and the award for best arrangement).

    He has released the following albums as a soloist: Stranac u noći (1987), Riječi čarobne (1988), Muzika za tebe (1989), Zemlja plesa (1990), Elements (1992), Benzina (1995), Massimo (2003), Vještina (2004), Zlatna kolekcija (2004), Apsolutno Uživo Klub Aquarius (2005), Vještina 2 (2006), Sunce se ponovo rađa (2008), Massimo Sings Sinatra (2010), Dodirni me slučajno (2011), Tvornica Kulture, Zagreb 14./15. Veljače 2012 (Mini Album, 2012). He won five Porin awards for best male vocal performance, 2004-2007 and 2012.

    More on his official sites:



  • Bach Double Violin Concerto in D Minor 2nd mvt. Largo; Voices of Music BWV 1043

    7:13

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    and we will make more videos like this one :)

    The Concerto for two violins, strings, and basso continuo in D Minor (BWV 1043) of J.S. Bach.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more
    videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website, Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    The concerto is surely one of the most complex, entrancing and beautiful of all of the concertos from the baroque period. We invite you to enjoy this timeless moment from the live performance at St. Mark's, San Francisco, performed on original instruments by Voices of Music. Featuring Carla Moore and Cynthia Miller Freivogel, solo baroque violins; Katherine Kyme and Lisa Grodin, baroque violins; David Daniel Bowes, baroque viola; Tanya Tomkins, continuo cello; Farley Pearce, violone, Katherine Heater, baroque organ; David Tayler, archlute.
    Please consider a donation,
    and we will make more videos like this one~!

  • Air on the G String J. S. Bach, original instruments

    5:20

    The second movement, Aria, from Bach's orchestral suite in D Major, BWV 1068, performed on original instruments from the time of Bach by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music. You can purchase our recording of this track on the Evening with Bach CD on iTunes, Amazon and Magnatune

    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more
    videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website, Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Voices of Music
    Hanneke van Proosdij & David Tayler, directors
    The musicians and their instruments
    Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754
    Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Timothy Johnson, Indiana, 1999 (after Stradivarius)
    Elizabeth Blumenstock, baroque violin by Andrea Guarneri, Cremona, 1660
    Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner, Mittenwald, 1791
    Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680
    William Skeen, five string baroque cello, Anonymous, Italy, c1680
    Farley Pearce, violone by George Steppani, Manchester, 1985,
    after Amati, 1560
    David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012
    after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610
    Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ by Winold van der Putten, Finsterwolde, Netherlands, 2004, after early 18th-century
    northern German instruments
    #Bach #AirontheGString

  • Arcangelo Corelli: Concerto Grosso Opus 6 No. 4 in D Major; Adagio & Allegro : Voices of Music

    3:49

    Hi everyone~! Please consider a donation, and we will make more videos like this one :)
    The opening Adagio and Allegro from Corelli's Concerto Grosso No. 4 in D Major, performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.

    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.

    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:

    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.

    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.

    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    300 years ago, Corelli's concertos, Op. 6, were published in 1714 in Amsterdam: these works dramatically affected the style of the baroque concerto for the next generation of composers. The reception of this magnificent collection, one of the crown jewels of baroque instrumental music, is in no small part due to the music publishing boom which began around 1690, as well as Corelli's signature set of trio sonatas, Opus 5, of which as Michal Talbot notes at least 42 editions had appeared by 1800. The wide availability of Corelli's works created an international Corellian style. The concertos are written in an expanded trio sonata style, in which the two solo violins and cello form a small ensemble within the larger tutti framework. The fourth concerto is noteworthy for its suave and serene introduction, the gracefulness of the dance movement, the exceptionally well-balanced counterpoint and harmony, and the furious concluding coda which flows out of the second ending of the last movement.
    HD Video from the Voices of Music Lamentations of Jeremiah concert, April, 2014. In the year 1702, the Avvisi di Roma noted that for a performance during Holy Week of Scarlatti's Lamentations, the orchestra also played a superb concerto for basses, violones, violins and violas of Arcangelo (Griffin, The Late Baroque Serenata). For the 300th anniversary of Corelli's concertos, we will be releasing on video selections from Corelli's Opus 6 as well as Handel's Opus 6.

    Voices of Music
    David Tayler & Hanneke van Proosdij, directors
    Kati Kyme & Elizabeth Blumenstock
    solo baroque violins
    Shirley Edith Hunt, solo baroque cello
    Gabrielle Wunsch & Maxine Nemerovski
    ripieno baroque violins
    Lisa Grodin, baroque viola
    Farley Pearce, violone
    Hanneke van Proosdij, baroque organ
    David Tayler, archlute
    #Corelli #ConcertoGrosso

  • Dora Pejačević - Two Piano Sketches Op.44 No.1 To You! Tebi!

    2:13

    - Composer: Dora Pejačević (10 September 1885 -- 5 March 1923)
    - Performer: Keiko Nishizu
    - Year of recording: 2013

    Zwei Klavierskizzen/Dvije skice za glasovir/Two Piano Sketches Op. 44 No. 1:
    An Dich! / Tebi! / To You!{To Thee}, written in 1918.

    According to the list of works compiled by Olga Schulz-Granitz (Croatian Music Institute) these were dedicated to Anny von Lange, although there is no dedication in the manuscript. In them, Dora Pejačević speaks with a new language, enriched by the lines of development in music from the beginning of the 20th century. They lead us to her most mature opuses, to the songs composed to texts by Friedrich Nietzsche, op. 53 (1920), and the 2nd String Quartet, op. 58 – the last work that she composed. The two sketches are intimate meditations in which the composer is immersed in thinking about a person of whom she is very fond, describing in music the most profound emotional states, but relinquishing anything merely attractive and external. The first sketch has the title An Dich! (To Thee!), and the second Vor deinem Bild (Before Thy Picture). In a very true sense, they constitute intimate diary accounts.

  • C.P.E. Bach: Cello Concerto in A Minor Wq. 170; William Skeen with Voices of Music, Andante 4K UHD

    7:11

    The Andante from Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach's Concerto in A minor, Wq.170, presented in celebration of his 300th anniversary. Performed on original instruments by the Early Music ensemble Voices of Music, William Skeen, soloist; 4K UHD video from our Virtuoso Concertos concert, November, 2014.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more
    videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website, Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    C.P.E. Bach transformed the musical language at the end of the Baroque, and as part of this process he also elevated the role of the cello, so that as a solo instrument it became the equal of the keyboard, violin and flute. This new balance is represented by the presentation of Bach’s concertos in multiple forms: the solo parts for the cello concertos were also arranged for harpsichord and flute. Although it is tempting to speculate that the cello versions were composed first, or specifically with the cello in mind, it is also quite possible that Carl Philipp could, first of all, handle the composition of three versions simultaneously, and, second, that he, like his father, was accomplished on a variety of instruments but was primarily a keyboard player. Nonetheless, the rich textures and compelling virtuosity of the concertos for cello make a persuasive case that the Carl Philipp--who occasionally cut a few compositional corners for lesser commissions--invested his best efforts in these concertos, which show a composer willing and able to emerge from the shadow of his extraordinary father, J.S. Bach.
    Performing parts based on the critical edition Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: The Complete Works ( were graciously made available by the publisher,
    the Packard Humanities Institute of Los Altos, California.
    The Musicians and their Instruments
    Voices of Music performs on original instruments: hear the music played on instruments from the time of the composer.
    Lisa Grodin, baroque viola by Mathias Eberl, Salzburg, Austria, 1680
    Kati Kyme, baroque violin by Johann Gottlob Pfretzschner,
    Mittenwald, Germany, 1791
    Carla Moore, baroque violin by Johann Georg Thir, Vienna, Austria, 1754
    Maxine Nemerovski, baroque violin by Timothy Johnson,
    Bloomington, Indiana, 1999 (after Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, Italy, 17th century)
    Farley Pearce, violone by George Stoppani, Manchester, 1985, after Amati, 1560
    Hanneke van Proosdij, Italian single manual harpsichord by Johannes Klinkhamer, Amsterdam, 2000, after Cristofori, Florence, c1725
    William Skeen, baroque cello by Gianbattista Grancino, Milan, 1725
    David Tayler, archlute by Andreas von Holst, Munich, 2012,
    after Magno Tieffenbrucker, Venice, c1610
    Tanya Tomkins, baroque cello, Lockey Hill, London, 1798
    Gabrielle Wunsch, baroque violin by Lorenzo Carcassi, 1764.

  • x
  • J.S. Bach: Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen BWV 51; Voices of Music with Laura Heimes & John Thiessen

    4:48

    Hi everyone~! Please consider a donation, and we will make more videos like this one :)
    Voices of Music performs the first aria from the cantata Jauchzet Gott in Allen Landen (BWV 51) on original instruments. Featuring Laura Heimes, soprano, and John Thiessen, baroque trumpet.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Bach's cantata is Italian in nature and makes extensive use of ritornello form within the larger framework of the Da Capo Aria. The original manuscripts are unusual in that they have doublets or extra parts for the strings, along with minimal solo and tutti markings. This performance features musicological research by Voices of Music into the works of Bach, and is also part of our Great Works series, which makes available exciting and historically based performances, along with editions of the music, free for teachers and students anywhere in the world.
    Jauchzet Gott is the only cantata by Bach for both solo trumpet and solo soprano, and the highly virtuosic solo parts are demanding even by Bach's standards. The soprano part covers two octaves and extends to high C. It is not known for whom the solo parts were composed; presumably the trumpet part was penned for the brilliant trumpeter Gottfried Reiche, and it is tempting to assume, as previous scholars have noted, that the solo soprano part was written for a visiting singer, as there was no known local singer at that time with a similar repertory. The first noted performance of the cantata was on the15th Sunday after Trinity, on 17 September 1730; the ms. is also marked et in ogni tempo, meaning that it could be performed at any time during the year.
    Many authors have noted the resemblance in the opening and closing arias to the Italian concerto style, and for this reason, combined with the presence of the extra string parts and the soli and tuti markings, one can make a good case for doubling the string parts. In addition to the doublets, the original set of parts contains extra continuo parts, which we have assigned to the violone and archlute. We have added solo parts for the first violin where we think it is stylistically appropriate.
    Pitch: A=415 Hz; temperament: Neidhardt 1724.
    #Bach #Jauchzet

  • J.S. Bach: Partita in A Minor for flute, Allemande BWV 1013; Kate Clark, baroque flute 4K UHD

    5:18

    Hey everyone~! Please consider a donation,
    and we will make more videos like this one :)
    The allemande from the Partita in A Minor by Johann Sebastian Bach, performed on the baroque flute by Kate Clark.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more

    videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from

    individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit

    our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about

    everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:


    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the

    original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to

    recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or

    violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they

    different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and

    players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning.

    Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were

    often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and

    with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which

    we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to

    more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches

    create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    The music is sourced from an undated manuscript; the handwriting suggests that the copyist worked on the violin partitas as well. The title is marked Solo p[our une] flûte traversière par J. S. Bach. The style of the opening allemande is similar to several of Bach's preludes, and contains some of his finest work as a composer.
    4K ultra high definition video from Voices of Music. Visit us on FB :)

    Visit Kate's page at the Royal Conservatoire in The Hague:

    Baroque flute by Martin Wenner, after an original instrument by Carlos Palanca, Turin, 18th century.
    #Bach #Partita

  • J.S. Bach Partita BWV 1013: Jan Van Hoecke, recorder; Voices of Music Bach Competition 2012

    4:57

    Hey everyone~! Please consider a donation,
    and we will make more videos like this one :)
    The Allemande from the solo partita of J.S. Bach BWV 1013, performed on baroque recorder by Jan Van Hoecke.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more videos like this one :)
    These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.

    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website,
    Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.

    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list

    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:

    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.

    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both 

    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.

    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Live video from the concert performed by the winners of the Voices of Music 2012 Bach Competition.
    Visit us on the web at

  • Goran Bregovic Funeral & Wedding music Live Italy Sep 2008

    4:46

    Goran Bregovic performing live in Casarano Italy, two hours of excelent WEDDING AND FUNERAL songs from the album Underground and from his last albums ALKOHOL. Goran executes songs of Tales and Songs for Weddings and Funerals and Alkohol with ensemble Goran Bregovic Wedding & Funeral Band with Ensemble) For info

    Goran Bregović (Горан Бреговић), born March 22, 1950 is a Yugoslav musician from Bosnia and Herzegovina and one of the most recognizable modern composers of the Balkans.
    GORAN GREGOVIC
    Born in Sarajevo of a Serbian mother and a Croatian father. After a few years of (very unenthusiastic) music studies at the conservatory (violin), Goran forms his first group The White Button at the age of sixteen. Goran Bregovic's music marries sounds of a gypsy brass band with traditional Bulgarian polyphonies, those of an electric guitar and traditional percussion with a curious rock accent.. all against a background of a bedevilled string orchestra and deep sonorities of a male choir, creating music that our soul recognises instinctively and the body greets with an irresistible urge to dance.

    GORAN BREGOVIC - EMIR KUSTURICA
    The music for Emir Kusturica's Underground, Palme d'Or at the 1995 Cannes Film Festival, was also signed by Goran Bregovic. But not the following film. A three year collaboration on Underground has worn everyone out and Emir Kusturica has to find a whole new team for his next film White Cat Black Cat.

    UNDERGROUND PRODUCTION
    Kalasnjikov (Kalashnikov), Ausencia, Mesecina, Ya ya (ringe ringe raja), Cajesukarije, Wedding, War, Underground, Underground tango, The belly button of the world, Sheva

    LIST OF SOLO AND MOVIE SOUNDTRACK ALBUMS
    Goran Bregović (1976, PGP RTB)
    A milicija trenira strogoću (1983, Jugoton)
    Dom za vjesanje (1989, Kamarad - Diskoton)
    Kuduz (1989, Diskoton)
    Les Temps des Gitans - Kuduz (1990, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    Arizona Dream - Soundtrack (1993, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    La reine Margot - Soundtrack (1994, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    Underground - Soundtrack (1995, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    P.S. (compilation 1996, Komuna)
    Silence of the Balkans (live album 1997, Mercury Records)
    Düğün ve Cenaze with Sezen Aksu (1997)
    Protopsálti (Πρωτοψάλτη)- Paradéchtika (Παραδέχτηκα) (1998)
    Ederlezi (compilation 1998, PolyGram
    Thessaloniki - Yannena with Two Canvas Shoes with George Dalaras (1999)
    Songbook (compilation 2000, Mercury Records - Universal)
    Kayah i Bregović (2000)
    Tales and songs from weddings and funerals (2002)
    Goran Bregovic's Karmen with a Happy End (2007- Universal)
    Alkohol (to be released October 2008)

  • World Championship of Folklore WORLD FOLK 2019

    1:01

    #Folklore #EAFF #EuroFolk

  • Bregovic - Goran Bregovic Live in Italy Sep 2008

    3:51

    Goran Bregovic performing live in Casarano Italy, two hours of excelent WEDDING AND FUNERAL songs from the album Underground and from his last albums ALKOHOL. Goran executes songs of Tales and Songs for Weddings and Funerals and Alkohol with ensemble Goran Bregovic Wedding & Funeral Band with Ensemble) For info

    Goran Bregović (Горан Бреговић), born March 22, 1950 is a Yugoslav musician from Bosnia and Herzegovina and one of the most recognizable modern composers of the Balkans.
    GORAN GREGOVIC
    Born in Sarajevo of a Serbian mother and a Croatian father. After a few years of (very unenthusiastic) music studies at the conservatory (violin), Goran forms his first group The White Button at the age of sixteen. Goran Bregovic's music marries sounds of a gypsy brass band with traditional Bulgarian polyphonies, those of an electric guitar and traditional percussion with a curious rock accent.. all against a background of a bedevilled string orchestra and deep sonorities of a male choir, creating music that our soul recognises instinctively and the body greets with an irresistible urge to dance.

    GORAN BREGOVIC - EMIR KUSTURICA
    The music for Emir Kusturica's Underground, Palme d'Or at the 1995 Cannes Film Festival, was also signed by Goran Bregovic. But not the following film. A three year collaboration on Underground has worn everyone out and Emir Kusturica has to find a whole new team for his next film White Cat Black Cat.

    UNDERGROUND PRODUCTION
    Kalasnjikov (Kalashnikov), Ausencia, Mesecina, Ya ya (ringe ringe raja), Cajesukarije, Wedding, War, Underground, Underground tango, The belly button of the world, Sheva

    LIST OF SOLO AND MOVIE SOUNDTRACK ALBUMS
    Goran Bregović (1976, PGP RTB)
    A milicija trenira strogoću (1983, Jugoton)
    Dom za vjesanje (1989, Kamarad - Diskoton)
    Kuduz (1989, Diskoton)
    Les Temps des Gitans - Kuduz (1990, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    Arizona Dream - Soundtrack (1993, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    La reine Margot - Soundtrack (1994, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    Underground - Soundtrack (1995, Kamarad - PolyGram - Komuna)
    P.S. (compilation 1996, Komuna)
    Silence of the Balkans (live album 1997, Mercury Records)
    Düğün ve Cenaze with Sezen Aksu (1997)
    Protopsálti (Πρωτοψάλτη)- Paradéchtika (Παραδέχτηκα) (1998)
    Ederlezi (compilation 1998, PolyGram
    Thessaloniki - Yannena with Two Canvas Shoes with George Dalaras (1999)
    Songbook (compilation 2000, Mercury Records - Universal)
    Kayah i Bregović (2000)
    Tales and songs from weddings and funerals (2002)
    Goran Bregovic's Karmen with a Happy End (2007- Universal)
    Alkohol (to be released October 2008)

  • Davorin Kempf - Zvukolik

    7:17

    Izvođač / Performer:
    Pedja Mužijević, klavir / piano

    Davorin Kempf - Zvukolik / Soundscape

    Zvukolik (1988.) se može shvatiti kao svojevrsni „ludus (a)tonalis“ predominantne neoimpresionističke zvučne geste. Skladba sažima bitne klavirske tehnike u cilju moderne ekspresije i izrazitog pijanističkog virtuoziteta. Slobodno koncipirani oblik „otvoren“ je interpoliranom (neobveznom) kadencom i improviziranim sekcijama u kojima interpret na trenutke postaje sukreator djela. Svaka izvedba predstavlja drugačiji zvukovni pejsaž – Zvukolik je u stalnoj mijeni.

    Soundscape can be perceived as a form of ludus (a)tonalis of a predominantly neo-impressionistic tonal gesture. Condensed within the composition are the main piano techniques, aimed at achieving a modern expression and a pronounced piano virtuosity. The freely conceived musical form is opened up by an interpolated (optional) cadenza and improvised sections which allow the performer moments of co-creation. Each performance represents a different sound scenery - Zvukolik is in an endless change.

    Davorin Kempf


    Snimka s albuma s djelima Davorina Kempfa iz serije Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji, izdavač Cantus, 2011. / Recording is available on CD with works by Davorin Kempf, Croatian Contemporary Composers series by Cantus editions, released in 2011

    Nabavite CD / Purchase this album:


    Popis djela Davorina Kempfa / List of works by this author:

  • REAL GERMAN BAVARIAN MUSIC FROM THE ALPES

    8:47

    BUY My NEW ALBUM Romantic Nights on AMAZON.COM
    Please follow the Link. Enjoy!


    Romantic Nights
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    54 minutes, 18 tracks
    Florian Stollmayer
    UPC: 889290923196
    Romantic Nights
    18 Romantic Songs on the Classical Guitar
    by
    Florian Stollmayer
    Classical Guitar

    1. SPANISH ROMANCE DE AMOR ANON.
    2. MI VIEJO AMOR (OTEO) ARR. STOLLMAYER
    3. LA PALOMA (Yradier/Tarrega)
    4. BARCAROLLE OP.51 NO. 1 (COSTE)
    5. LA GOLONDRINA (SERRADELL)
    6. MALAGUENA SPANISH TRADITIONAL
    7. CORAZON CANCION MEXICANA
    8. ALOHA OE + SPANISH ROMANCE DE AMOR
    9. DANNY BOY IRISH TRADITIONAL
    10. CATARI, CATARI (Cardillo)
    11. MEXICAN CANTINA
    12. RUMBA FLAMENCA
    13. UEBER D'ALMA GERMAN/BAVARIAN FOLK SONG
    14. GRANADA SPANISH FANTASY
    15. HABANERA FROM CARMEN
    16. LA ZANDUNGA + LA PALOMA
    17. SPANISH VALS DE AMOR + LAS MANANITAS
    18. ESTRELLITA (PONCE)

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    THEAKADEMIA MUSIC AWARD WINNER JUNE 2016
    CATEGORY LATIN/INSTRUMENTAL
    FLORIAN STOLLMAYER SPANISH ROMANCE DE AMOR



    #LaGuitarraMexicana
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    #Malagueña
    #RumbaFlamenca
    #Aranjuez
    #Tango
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    #VincenteFernandez
    #LaGuitarraMexicana
    #Romanceanonymous
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    #FlorianStollmayer
    #RomanticNights
    #Oktoberfest
    #Munich
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    #AQuickGuidetotheOktoberfest

  • Branko Lazarin - Divici Mariji

    7:46

    Izvođači / Performed by:
    New London Chamber Choir
    James Wood, dirigent / conductor

    Snimka koncertne izvedbe, MBZ 1999. / Recorded live at Music Biennale Zagreb in 1999

    Branko Lazarin - Divici Mariji / To the Virgin Mary

    Divici Mariji / To the Virgin Mary

    Zdrava si, Marije, zdrav, lilju pribili,
    ki u prsi krije tvoj Sinak premili;
    na grišne se smili, puna si milosti,
    duša k tebi cvili, čuvaj nas žalosti.

    Da nam tvoj Sin prosti, moli ga, Kraljice,
    sunčene svitlosti, prisvitla Danice;
    Božja nevistice u Trojstvu Božjemu,
    dobra odvitnice pri Sinku tvojemu.

    Uzdahu mojemu priklon' uši tvoje,
    u grihu mojemu gdi cvilim, Gospoje;
    neka sarce moje vazda želi k tebi,
    gdino sveti stoje, da najdem stan sebi.

    Marko Marulić (1450 - 1524)

    English translation:


    Snimka je dostupna na autorskom albumu Branka Lazarina, izdanje Cantusa i HRT-a iz 2014., Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji / Recording is available on CD with music by Branko Lazarin, Cantus release from 2014, Croatian Contemporary Composers series

    Nabavite CD / Purchase CD;


    Popis djela Branka Lazarina / List of works by this author:


    Playlist: Echoes of the MBZ

  • Heinrich Biber: Battalia, Die liederliche Gesellschaft von allerley Humor; Voices of Music 4K UHD

    1:23

    !!! It's supposed to sound crazy :) The fantastical quodlibet Die liederliche Gesellschaft von allerley Humor from Biber's Battalia. 4K video from the Voices of Music Virtuoso Concertos concert, December, 2017.
    In this unusual work, Biber weaves together popular songs using an unprecedented level of dissonance. This work is presented here for the first time in 4K, ultra-high definition video.
    Voices of Music
    Hanneke van Proosdi & David Tayler, directors.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more
    videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website, Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Original title (old spelling): Die liederliche Gselschafft von allerley Humor.
    #Biber

  • Tena Ivana Borić — A-D-H-D

    7:09

    Izvođač / Performer:
    Bruno Philipp, klarinet / clarinet

    Skladba je praizvedena 2015. godine na Glazbenoj tribini u Opatiji / First performance of this piece was in 2015 at Musical Platform Opatija

    Notni zapis uskoro dostupan kao PDF izdanje / PDF score soon available at:


    Snimka je dostupna na CD-u / Recording is available on CD:
    Mozaik hrvatskih skladatelja / Mosaic of Croatian Composers

    Nabavite CD / Purchase CD:


    Popis djela Tene Ivane Borić / List of works by this composer:

  • Saša Bastalec: Introduction

    1:03

    Project #60secondsofaccordion was created by Croatian accordionist Martina Jembrišak during corona virus outbreak in the world.
    As all her concerts were cancelled she decided to spent her time in quarantine in a different way - by collaborating with composers in aim to create new compositions which will be premiered and presented to listeners online on social networks such as SoundCloud, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook and her website
    Every working day during the quarantine period she will post one new composition from all around the world.

  • Sanja Drakulić - United We Stand, Divided We Fall

    14:12

    Izvođači / Performers:
    Duo Krasnitsky
    Konstantin Krasnitsky, klavir / piano
    Yuliya Krasnitskaya, klavir / piano

    Snimka s autorskog albuma Sanje Drakulić u izdanju Cantusa, iz serije albuma Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji / This track is available on album with music by Sanja Drakulić, Croatian Contemporary Composers series, released in 2015 by Cantus editions

    Nabavite album / Purchase CD:


    Popis djela Sanje Drakulić / List of works by this author:


    Posebna zahvala izdavaču notnog izdanja, Umjetničkoj akademiji pri Sveučilištu Josipa Juraja Strossmayera u Osijeku / Special thanks to the publisher - Academy of Arts in Osijek, J.J. Strossmayer University of Osijek

  • Gaslighter

    3:24

    Provided to YouTube by Columbia

    Gaslighter · The Chicks

    Gaslighter

    ℗ 2020 Columbia Records, a Division of Sony Music Entertainment

    Released on: 2020-03-04

    Fiddle, Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Martie Maguire
    12-string Guitar, Acoustic Guitar, Drums, Keyboards, Melodica, Percussion, Piano, Composer, Lyricist, Producer, Recording Engineer: Jack Antonoff
    Banjo, Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Emily Strayer
    Vocal, Composer, Lyricist: Natalie Maines
    Drums: Chad Smith
    Percussion: Sean Hutchinson
    Percussion: Mike Riddleberger
    Recording Engineer: Laura Sisk
    Assistant Engineer: Jon Sher
    Mixing Engineer: Serban Ghenea
    Engineer: John Hanes
    Mastering Engineer: Chris Gehringer
    Mastering Engineer: Will Quinnell

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Dalibor Bukvić - Prophéties

    12:27

    Izvođač / Performer: Dalibor Bukvić, klavir / piano

    Snimka koncertne izvedbe s Glazbene tribine Opatija 1992. / Recorded live at the Musical Platform Opatija in 1992

    Popis djela Dalibora Bukvića / List of works by this author:


    Snimka je dostupna na autorskom albumu Dalibora Bukvića, Cantusovo izdanje iz serije Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji / Recording is available on the album from Croatian Contemporary Composers series by Cantus Editions:


    Playlist Echoes of the Musical Platform:

  • Tomaso Albinoni - Sinfonia in G Adagio - Sinfonietta - Sydney Youth Orchestra - SYO

    1:50

    Sinfonia in G Adagio by Tomaso Albinoni. Michael Thrift is conducting the SYO Sinfonietta. Live concert in HD with Dolby Stereo Sound.

    From the Sydney Youth Orchestra's SYO Winter Family Concert on Saturday 19 June 2010 at Verbrugghen Hall, Sydney Conservatorium of Music, NSW, Australia.

    The Orchestra's website is

    Tomaso Giovanni Albinoni (8 June 1671 -- 17 January 1751) was a Venetian Baroque composer. While famous in his day as an opera composer, he is mainly remembered today for his instrumental music, some of which is regularly recorded.

    Born in Venice, Republic of Venice, to Antonio Albinoni, a wealthy paper merchant in Venice, he studied violin and singing. Relatively little is known about his life, especially considering his contemporary stature as a composer, and the comparatively well-documented period in which he lived. In 1694 he dedicated his Opus 1 to the fellow-Venetian, Cardinal Pietro Ottoboni (grand-nephew of Pope Alexander VIII); Ottoboni was an important patron in Rome of other composers, such as Arcangelo Corelli. Albinoni was possibly employed in 1700 as a violinist to Charles IV, Duke of Mantua, to whom he dedicated his Opus 2 collection of instrumental pieces. In 1701 he wrote his hugely popular suites Opus 3, and dedicated that collection to Cosimo III de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany.

    In 1705, he was married; Antonino Biffi, the maestro di cappella of San Marco was a witness, and evidently was a friend of Albinoni's. Albinoni seems to have no other connection with that primary musical establishment in Venice, however, and achieved his early fame as an opera composer at many cities in Italy, including Venice, Genoa, Bologna, Mantua, Udine, Piacenza, and Naples. During this time he was also composing instrumental music in abundance: prior to 1705, he mostly wrote trio sonatas and violin concertos, but between then and 1719 he wrote solo sonatas and concertos for oboe.

    Unlike most composers of his time, he appears never to have sought a post at either a church or noble court, but then he was a man of independent means and had the option to compose music independently. In 1722, Maximilian II Emanuel, Elector of Bavaria, to whom Albinoni had dedicated a set of twelve concertos, invited him to direct two of his operas in Munich.

    Around 1740, a collection of Albinoni's violin sonatas was published in France as a posthumous work, and scholars long presumed that meant that Albinoni had died by that time. However it appears he lived on in Venice in obscurity; a record from the parish of San Barnaba indicates Tomaso Albinoni died in Venice in 1751, of diabetes.

    He wrote some fifty operas of which twenty-eight were produced in Venice between 1723 and 1740, while there are a few modern sources attributing - probably inaccurately - 81 operas to the composer. Today he is most noted for his instrumental music, especially his oboe concertos. He is thought to have been the first Italian composer to employ the oboe as a solo instrument in concerti (c. 1715, in his masterful 12 concerti a cinque, op. 7) and the first composer globally to publish such works, while it is likely that the first existing concerti featuring a solo oboe came from German composers such as Telemann or Händel, although probably unpublished. In Italy, Alessandro Marcello published his well known oboe concerto in D minor a little later, in 1717. Albinoni has also been fond of the instrument regarding chamber works.
    His instrumental music greatly attracted the attention of Johann Sebastian Bach, who wrote at least two fugues on Albinoni's themes and constantly used his basses for harmony exercises for his pupils.

    Part of Albinoni's work was lost in World War II with the destruction of the Dresden State Library, thus little is known of his life and music after the mid-1720s.

    A full list of music from the Lunchtime concert is:

    SYO Stringin' Along

    Speer, Cable Car Crossing
    Speer, Aztec Sunrise
    Speer, Ear-igami

    Camerata, Symphony No. 4
    Camerata, Beethoven
    Camerata, Lemon Twist

    Chamber, Concerto Polonoise
    Chamber, Ghosts of Brandenburg

    Sinfonietta, Chaconne
    Sinfonietta, Sinfonia in G Adagio
    Sinfonietta, Sinfonia in G Allegro

    .
    .

  • Thomas Burić - Some like to show it off

    3:39

    Izvodi / Performed by:
    Daniel Thorell, violončelo / cello

    Thomas Burić - Some like to show it off ⎪ for solo cello
    Commissioned by the 7th International Cello Competition Antonio Janigro

    Video je snimljen za potrebe 7. Međunarodnog violončelističkog natjecanja Antonio Janigro, održanog u Zagrebu od 1.veljače do 7. veljače 2020.
    Daniel Thorell dobitnik je nagrade Hrvatskog društva skladatelja za najbolju izvedbu zadane skladbe. / Recorded for 7th International Cello Competition Antonio Janigro, held from 1st to 7th of February 2020 in Zagreb, Croatia. Daniel Thorell received special award by Croatian Composers' Society for the best performance of commissioned work.

    O natjecanju / About Antonio Janigro Competition:

    O solistu / About soloist:


    Video i audio su vlasništvo UNISON-a:


    Uploaded with permission from UNISON

    Playlist Our Friends:

  • Massimo Savić - Crni snjegovi

    4:26

    Massimo Savić - Crni snjegovi
    (Zlatna Palma Dubrovnik '89 / Cavtat Fest 1989)
    Music: Zrinko Tutić.
    Lyrics: Marina Tucaković.
    Arrangement: Krešimir Klemenčić.
    Audio (C) Jugoton 1989

    Song from the 16th Karneval Fest, held in the Croatian small town Cavtat, near Dubrovnik. The festival changed names few times - Karneval, Cavtat Fest, Zlatna Palma Dubrovnik. This was the best edition that I have seen - there were quite few top stars of the Yugoslav scene and the festival was non competitive. In addition to the LP compilation, in 1989 a 60 mins VHS video of the festival program was released. Mandy Ligios (from Moon Ray / Raggio Di Luna) was a special guest star of the evening. She sang her hit Comancero.

    Crni snjegovi was also released on Massimo's album Muzika za tebe (1989).

    Massimo Savić is a Croatian pop singer. He first became popular with his band Dorian Gray (1982-1986) with whom he released two albums for Jugoton (Sjaj u tami (1983),
    Za tvoje oči (1985)). He started his solo career at Mesam Music Festival 1986, but the turning point was his appearance at the Yugoslav pre-selection for Eurovision 1987, where he was second with Samo jedan dan, the song that will become a smash hit in all the countries of former Yugoslavia, and would be the song of the year at the discography Grand Prix awards at Mesam 1987, and himself a winner of the best male singer award. He will try his luck at Yugoslav Eurovision pre-sellections two more times - Plavi anđeo (1989, 2nd again), Pjesma za tebe (1990, 8th), and few more times at the Croatian Dora, but never made it to the Euro-stage. He will come back in competition in Belgrade at Mesam in 1988 with Odmori se na mojim rukama, when he wins all the major awards (1st prize of the Yugoslav radio stations, 1st prize of the Jury and the Award for the best act by the Yugoslav Union of Composers - SOKOJ, and again in 1990 with Ovisan o tvoje ljubavi (2nd prize of the audience, 2nd prize of the Jury and the award for best arrangement).

    He has released the following albums as a soloist: Stranac u noći (1987), Riječi čarobne (1988), Muzika za tebe (1989), Zemlja plesa (1990), Elements (1992), Benzina (1995), Massimo (2003), Vještina (2004), Zlatna kolekcija (2004), Apsolutno Uživo Klub Aquarius (2005), Vještina 2 (2006), Sunce se ponovo rađa (2008), Massimo Sings Sinatra (2010), Dodirni me slučajno (2011), Tvornica Kulture, Zagreb 14./15. Veljače 2012 (Mini Album, 2012). He won five Porin awards for best male vocal performance, 2004-2007 and 2012.

    More on his official sites:





  • Georg Friedrich Händel

    46:45

    George Frideric Handel ( 23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759) was a German-born Baroque composer famous for his operas, oratorios, anthems and organ concertos. Born in a family indifferent to music, Handel received critical training in Halle, Hamburg and Italy before settling in London (1712), and became a naturalized British subject in 1727. He was strongly influenced both by the great composers of the Italian Baroque and the middle-German polyphonic choral tradition.

    Within fifteen years, Handel had started three commercial opera companies to supply the English nobility with Italian opera. Musicologist Winton Dean writes that his operas show that Handel was not only a great composer; he was a dramatic genius of the first order. As Alexander's Feast (1736) was well received, Handel made a transition to English choral works. After his success with Messiah (1742) he never performed an Italian opera again. It has been said that the passion of Handel's oratorios is an ethical one, and that they are hallowed not by liturgical dignity but by moral ideals of humanity. Almost blind, and having lived in England for nearly fifty years, he died in 1759, a respected and rich man. His funeral was given full state honours, and he was buried in Westminster Abbey.

    Handel is regarded as one of the greatest composers of the Baroque era, with works such as Water Music, Music for the Royal Fireworks and Messiah remaining popular. One of his four Coronation Anthems, Zadok the Priest (1727), composed for the coronation of George II of Great Britain, has been performed at every subsequent British coronation, traditionally during the sovereign's anointing. Handel composed more than forty operas in over thirty years, and since the late 1960s, with the revival of baroque music and historically informed musical performance, interest in Handel's operas has grown.

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  • My Piano / My Face Music Book

    3:45

    2016 Classical Album of the Year Winner - SoloPiano.com
    Buy now at :
    My Face Music Book - All music composed,
    performed and produced by Matej Meštrović
    Mastering By Zvonimir Dusper Dus,
    Photography By Saša Četković

    Including music sheet and bonus track In the sea the sound rec.1975.
    All rights reserved
    Meštrović je rijetko sugestivan skladatelj, njegove profinjene i elegantne skladbe lako ulaze u uho i svakog slušatelja bez većih problema pretvaraju u redatelja koji od vlastitih osjećaja i sjećanja režira neki svoj film. U svijetu koji je sve razjareniji i uskomešaniji, “My Face Music Book” poziv je na aktivnu meditaciju i smirenje duše, ali i album koji je ukrotio i samog autora nadaleko čuvenog po svojim energičnim i temperamentnim nastupima i potezima. Skladbe kao što su to “My piano”, “Dewdrops”, “Malincolico” i posebno “La Petite Valse” s albuma “My Face Music Book” ostat će trajna vrijednost onog dijela hrvatske suvremene glazbe koja se ne želi odmetnuti u nekomunikativnu pozersku artificijelnost pod svaku cijenu. Denis Derk - Večernji list


    Matej Mestrovic is one of the few Croatian musicians / composers who create beautiful pictures with their music, while magically putting a smile on your face at the same time. Meštrović climbed to the throne of the elected with this album, of those who lead us through dreams with their music that you listen as a privilege or you take it as a remedy against the cruel reality.
    Dubravko Jagatić

  • Silvio Foretić - Troglasna invencija

    8:20

    Izvođači / Performers:

    Zagrebački gitarski trio / Zagreb Guitar Trio
    Darko Petrinjak, gitara i kontrabas / guitar and double bass
    István Römer, gitara / guitar
    Goran Listeš, gitara / guitar

    Snimka s albuma / Recording from CD:

    Travanj je najokrutniji mjesec: glazba našeg doba / April is the Cruellest Month: Music of Our Time

    Izdanje Hrvatskog društva skladatelja iz 1995. / Released by the Croatian Composers' Society in 1995

    Popis djela Silvija Foretića / List of works by this author:

  • Dalibor Bukvić - Diptih

    9:16

    Izvođači / Performers:
    Damir Gregurić, klavir/piano
    Cantus Ansambl
    Ivan Josip Skender, dirigent/conductor

    Popis djela Dalibora Bukvića / List of works by this author:


    Snimka je dostupna na autorskom albumu Dalibora Bukvića, Cantusovo izdanje iz serije Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji / Recording is available on the album from Croatian Contemporary Composers series by Cantus Editions:

  • DONIZETTI Heroines - The Collectors boxset

    4:42

    This DVD box-set is entitled Donizetti Heroines because many of the composer’s operas are named after their female protagonists. Even in the few cases where they aren’t, they give musical portrayals of unforgettable female characters, tragic and passionate figures, often innocent victims of the infernal gears of power and therefore destined to a hapless fate.

    Between 1818 and 1843 Gaetano Donizetti composed some seventy operas, many of which became very popular in his day. His first success came in 1830 with Anna Bolena and from that moment he rivalled Bellini as the ‘leading operatic composer in Italy’, churning out works with the constant rhythm of a typical 18th-century composer.

    Some of Donizetti’s best works rank among the masterpieces of 19th-century opera. A few of them have remained in the repertoire worldwide since their debut, while others were to be revived only from the second half of the 1900s, in the wake of what has rightly been called the ‘Donizetti Renaissance’. Today operatic audiences are radically different from those of two hundred years ago and during the 2018/19 season Donizetti was placed fifth in the list of the world’s most represented composers. We believe that the credit for this goes to his splendid heroines and their great interpreters who, yesterday and today, brought them alive on stage and continue to do so. This collectors’ release offers a selection of nine operas featuring some of the most iconic and unforgettable Donizetti characters, performed by outstanding singers such as Mariella Devia, Jessica Pratt, Carmela Remigio, Patrizia Ciofi and Sonia Ganassi.
    BUY/ORDER:

    Content:

    DVDs 1–2
    ANNA BOLENA
    Teatro Donizetti Bergamo, October 2006
    Dimitra Theodossiou, Gian Luca Pasolini,
    Riccardo Zanellato, Sofia Soloviy
    Orchestra and Chorus of Bergamo Musica Festival Gaetano Donizetti
    Conductor: Fabrizio Maria Carminati
    Director: Francesco Esposito
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Spanish
    DVDs 3–4
    PIA DE’ TOLOMEI
    Teatro La Fenice di Venezia, April 2005
    Patrizia Ciofi, Dario Schmunck, Andrew Schroeder, Laura Polverelli, Francesco Meli
    Orchestra e Coro del Teatro La Fenice di Venezia
    Conductor: Paolo Arrivabeni
    Director: Christian Gangneron
    Video Director: Tiziano Mancini
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese
    DVD 5
    LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR
    Teatro Donizetti Bergamo, October 2006
    Désirée Rancatore, Roberto De Biasio, Luca Grassi, Enrico Giuseppe Iori
    Orchestra and Chorus of Bergamo Musica Festival Gaetano Donizetti
    Conductor: Antonino Fogliani
    Director: Francesco Esposito
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Spanish
    DVD 6
    IL CASTELLO DI KENILWORTH
    Teatro Sociale di Bergamo – Festival Donizetti 2018
    Jessica Pratt, Carmela Remigio,
    Xabier Anduaga, Stefan Pop
    Orchestra and Chorus of Donizetti Opera
    Conductor: Riccardo Frizza
    Director: Maria Pilar Pérez Aspa
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean
    DVDs 8–9
    LA FAVORITE
    Opera di Firenze / Maggio Musicale Fiorentino, February 2018
    Veronica Simeoni, Celso Albelo, Mattia Olivieri,
    Ugo Guagliardo, Manuel Amati
    Orchestra and Chorus of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino
    Conductor: Fabio Luisi
    Director: Ariel Garcia-Valdés
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean
    DVD 10
    PIGMALIONE
    Teatro Sociale di Bergamo – Festival Donizetti 2017
    Aya Wakizono, Antonino Siragusa
    Orchestra dell’Accademia Teatro alla Scala
    Conductor: Gianluca Capuano
    Director: Roberto Catalano
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean
    DVD 11
    ROBERTO DEVEREUX
    Teatro Carlo Felice Genova, March 2016
    Mariella Devia, Sonia Ganassi, Stefan Pop, Mansoo Kim, Alessandro Fantoni
    Orchestra and Chorus of Teatro Carlo Felice, Genova
    Conductor: Francesco Lanzillotta
    Director: Alfonso Antoniozzi
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean
    DVDs 12–13
    ROSMONDA D’INGHILTERRA
    Teatro Donizetti Bergamo, November 2016
    Jessica Pratt, Eva Mei, Dario Schmunck, Nicola Ulivieri
    Orchestra and Chorus of Donizetti Opera
    Conductor: Sebastiano Rolli
    Director: Paola Rota
    Video Director: Matteo Ricchetti
    Subtitles: Italian, English, French, German, Japanese, Korean
    Produced by DYNAMIC SRL Italy
    Worldwide distribution: NAXOS
    Available on DVD: 37859

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    #Opera #Recommended #Donizetti

  • Zoran Juranić - Sonata

    19:16

    Izvođač / Performed by:
    Darko Petrinjak, gitara / guitar

    Preludio 0:09
    Scherzo 4:34
    Ciacciona 10:17

    Snimka s autorskog albuma Zorana Juranića iz serije Hrvatski suvremeni skladatelji, nakladnik Cantus, izdanje iz 2009./ Recording is available on CD Zoran Juranić from Croatian Contemporary Composers series, released by Cantus in 2009.

    Nabavite CD / Purchase CD:


    Nabavite notno izdanje / Purchase score:


    Popis djela Zorana Juranića / List of works by this author:

  • JONATHAN DAVID LITTLE - Basque Lullaby, Op.1a SCORE for Voice and Piano

    2:02

    Setting of a Basque lullaby for individual voice (or chorus) and piano, demonstrated here by soprano Heather Keens in a folk style.

    Publishers: Publications by Wirripang (score shown by kind permission). Purchase sheet music at:


    Enquiries regarding the music may be directed to the publisher or composer.

    More information:

    Master recording owned by the composer. All Rights Reserved.

    Other verses may be added, the text of which has been translated as:

    1. Lullaby, twilight is spreading,
    Silver wings over the sky;
    Fairy elves are softly treading
    Folding buds as they pass by.

    REFRAIN
    Lullaby, Whisper and sigh,
    Lullaby, Lullaby!

    2. Lullaby, daytime is weary,
    Tired of work, tired of play,
    Sleep, my baby, sleep my dearie,
    Now you are as tired as they.

    REFRAIN

    3. Lullaby, deep in the clover
    Drones the bee softly to rest;
    Close, white lids, your dear eyes over,
    Mother’s arms shall be your nest.

    REFRAIN

  • Telemann: Trio Sonata in D Minor, Allegro. Voices of Music

    3:03

    The allegro from the Trio Sonata in D minor by Telemann, performed live by the San Francisco Early Music Ensemble Voices of Music.
    Voices of Music FAQ
    Q. How can I support Voices of Music?
    A. Donate here: and we will make more
    videos like this one :) These videos cost thousands of dollars to make, and the money comes from individual donors.
    Q. Where can I learn more about this music?
    A. You can visit our website, Also, subscribe to our video channel! Just click on the logo on our videos.
    Q. Where can we hear you play in concert?
    A. We perform in the San Francisco Bay Area. For a concert schedule, visit our website or join our mailing list
    Q. Where can I buy CDs?
    A. Our CDs are available on iTunes, Google, Amazon, CD Baby and just about everywhere; you can also buy a CD in a jewel case from Kunaki:
    Q. What is Early Music performance, or historical performance?
    A. We play on instruments from the time of the composers, and we use the original music and playing techniques: it’s a special sound.
    Q. Why are there no conductors?
    A. Conductors weren’t invented until the 19th century; since we seek to recreate a historical performance, the music is led from the keyboard or violin, or the music is played as chamber music~or both :)
    Q. What are period instruments or original instruments; how are they different from modern instruments?
    A. As instruments became modernized in the 19th century, builders and players tended to focus on the volume of sound and the stability of tuning. Modern steel strings replaced the older materials, and instruments were often machine made. Historical instruments, built individually by hand and with overall lighter construction, have extremely complex overtones—which we find delightful. Modern instruments are of course perfectly suited to more modern music.
    Q. Why is the pitch lower, or higher?
    A. Early Music performance uses many different pitches, and these pitches create different tone colors on the instruments. See
    Featuring Hanneke van Proosdij, recorder; Carla Moore, baroque violin; Joanna Blendulf, viola da gamba, David Tayler, archlute; Rodney Gehrke, chamber organ.

  • Olja Jelaska - Cvijet šaronski

    16:27

    Izvođači / Performers:

    Trio Solenza
    Arijana Gigliani Philipp, sopran / soprano
    Bruno Philipp, klarinet / clarinet
    Ivan Batoš, klavir / piano

    Olja Jelaska - Cvijet šaronski / Rose of Sharon

    Popis djela Olje Jelaske / List of works by this composer:


    Snimka s albuma Mozaik hrvatskih skladatelja, izdanje Croatia Records-a iz 2016., snimljeno u Multimedijskom studiju Muzičke akademije u Zagrebu / recording from CD Mosaic Of Croatian Composers, recorded at Zagreb Academy of Music, released by Croatia Records in 2016

    Notno izdanje je vlasništvo Udruge profesionalnih glazbenika Diapason / Score is copyrighted by the Association of the Professional Musicians Diapason


    Nabavite CD / Get CD:

  • Anđelko Klobučar - Sonata za alt saksofon i klavir / for Alto Saxophone and Piano

    15:07

    Izvođači / Performers:
    Tomislav Žužak, alt saksofon / alto-saxophone
    Vlasta Gyura, klavir / piano

    Anđelko Klobučar: Sonata za alt saksofon i klavir / for Alto Saxophone and Piano (1982)

    1. Allegro 0:09 - 4:54
    2. Largo 5:02 - 9:57
    3. Vivace 10:46 - 14:58

    S albuma / From CD: Susreti s hrvatskim skladateljima / Encounters With Croatian Composers


    Izdanje / Edition:

    Popis djela Anđelka Klobučara / List of works by Anđelko Klobučar:

  • Monteverdi: Tirsi E Clori - Pastoral Ballet

    20:31

    This is actually a mini-ballet that Monteverdi revised for inclusion in his seventh book of madrigals by reducing it from eight parts to five. During the first large section, with Tirsi and Clori, the music is relatively spare and recitative-like, about as engaging as one of the lesser duets in the book. Versus Tirsi's agitated, chatty lines, Clori sings in a manner much more legato and drawn out. Hers is the preferable music. When they sing together the melodic style becomes, predictably, a mixture of the two manners. When all five voices come in for the latter sections, it's one of the best parties you've ever been to.

    The best music consists mostly of strong, dancy homophonic statements by part of or the whole of the vocal group. There are moments when the marcati are so strong, backed with heavy emphasis on the harpsichord, that they seem like flashes of benevolent lightning, and are quite as pleasantly shocking.

    The tone of the madrigal, as befits the text, and as befits the final number in a grand collection, is unreservedly celebratory. It's fully harmonized in the voices so the instruments are mainly present to enrich the timbre, and enrich it they do. Some cakes are barely as tall as the icing on top. Monteverdi is perhaps at his best when composing in a celebratory vein, and is surely one of the great composers of happy music of all time.

    ******

    Track List:

    I. Allegro [tutti] (0:00)
    II. Allegretto (6:47)
    III. Allegro gaio (13:17)

    ******

    If you like this video subscribe to my channel. There are many more videos like this one lovingly prepared and edited by myself for your enjoyment! Check out my extensive playlist collections as well.

  • Corelli ‐ Sonate 7 in D minor ‐ 2 Corrente, allegro

    3:42

    I hope you like classical music as much as I do!

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