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Playlist of List of Belgian classical composers

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  • Crowdfunding for 4 generations of Belgian composers

    3:04

    Old and new trumpet compositions by Flemish and Walloon composers to let those composers revive and shine and the trumpet alive.

  • The fosse - Wim Mertens

    7:14

    Wim Mertens ensemble
    Live at de Roma, Antwerp, Belgium - September 30th, 2005

    All music composed, arranged and produced by Wim Mertens
    Published by Usura 2006, 2008 All rights reserved

    Website:
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  • The Best of Classical Music - 50 Greatest Pieces: Mozart, Beethoven, Chopin, Bach...

    5:9:57

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    THE BEST OF CLASSICAL MUSIC

    1 MOZART Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, K. 525: I. Allegro 00:00
    2 VIVALDI The Four Seasons, Concerto No. 1 Spring: I. Allegro 05:58
    3 STRAUSS II An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 09:15
    4 RACHMANINOFF Symphony No. 2, Op. 27: III. Adagio 20:39
    5 TCHAIKOVSKY Swan Lake: Scene by a Lake 34:48
    6 BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata No. 14, Moonlight Sonata: I. Adagio sostenuto 37:19
    7 LISZT Consolations, S. 172: No. 3, Lento placido 42:11
    8 SAINT-SAENS The Carnival of the Animals: XIII, The Swan 46:10
    9 SCHUMANN 5 Pieces in Folk Style, Op. 102: No. 2, Langsam 48:48
    10 RACHMANINOFF Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini: Var. XVIII 53:19
    11 DEBUSSY 2 Arabesques: No. 1, Andantino con moto 56:15
    12 CHOPIN Nocturnes, Op. 9: No. 2 1:00:21
    13 BACH Orchestral Suite No. 3, BWV 1068: II. Air on the G String 1:04:39
    14 HAYDN Cello Concerto No. 2, Op. 101: II. Adagio 1:07:56
    15 TCHAIKOVSKY Serenade for Strings, Op. 48: II. Valse 1:12:23
    16 GRIEG Holberg Suite, Op. 40: II. Sarabande 1:16:07
    17 SIBELIUS Andante Festivo 1:19:50
    18 TOSCA Vissi d’arte 1:23:56
    19 TCHAIKOVSKY Romeo & Juliet: Fantasy Overture 1:26:34
    20 MOZART Die Zauberflöte, K. 620: Ouverture 1:46:31
    21 STRAUSS II Frühlingsstimmen, Op. 410 1:53:43
    22 MENDELSSOHN Symphony No. 4, Op. 90 Italian: IV. Saltarello. Presto 2:01:16
    23 VIVALDI The Four Seasons, Concerto No. 2, RV 315 Summer: III. Presto 2:07:13
    24 MOZART Symphony No. 40, K. 550: I. Molto allegro 2:09:51
    25 BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 3, Op. 55 ‘Eroica’: I. Allegro con brio 2:18:01
    26 ROSSINI The Barber of Seville: Overture 2:32:52
    27 MUSSORGSKY Night on a Bare Mountain 2:39:46
    28 MOZART Symphony No., K. 551 Jupiter: IV. Molto Allegro 2:50:59
    29 BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 6, Op. 68 Pastoral: I. Allegro ma non troppo 2:59:53
    30 WAGNER Siegfried Idyll 3:10:44
    31 MOZART Le Nozze di Figaro: Voi che sapete 3:30:13
    32 MOZART Don Giovanni: Non più andrai, farfallone amoroso 3:32:26
    33 BACH Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, BWV 1048: I. Allegro 3:35:44
    34 TELEMANN Viola Concerto, TWV 51:G9: I. Largo 3:41:34
    35 BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7, Op. 92: II. Allegretto 3:45:07
    36 SATIE Trois Gymnopedies: No. 1, Lent et doloreux 3:54:07
    37 CHOPIN Nocturne in C sharp minor, Op. Posth. 3:56:55
    38 LISZT Liebesträume, S. 541: No. 3 4:01:33
    39 SCHUMANN Kinderszenen, Op. 15: No. 7, Träumerei 4:07:12
    40 CHOPIN 24 Préludes, Op. 28: No. 15, Raindrop 4:10:26
    41 DEBUSSY Suite bergamasque, L. 75: No. 3, Clair de lune 4:16:57
    42 CHOPIN Nocturnes, Op. 27: No. 2, Lento sostenuto 4:21:43
    43 SATIE Gnossiennes: No. 1, Lent 4:27:39
    44 MOZART Fantasia in D minor, K. 397 4:30:47
    45 MOZART Piano Sonata No. 11, K 331: III. Alla Turca 4:37:25
    46 LISZT Grandes études de Paganini, S. 141: No. 3, La campanella 4:41:03
    47 CHOPIN Ballade No. 4, Op. 52 (live recording) 4:46:01
    48 CHOPIN Études, Op. 10: No. 12, Revolutionary 4:58:47
    49 RIMSKY-KORSAKOV The Tale of Tsar Saltan: Flight of the Bumblebee 5:01:28
    50 SAINT-SAENS Danse Macabre 5:02:49

    1, 20: Opole Philharmonic Orchestra, Werner Stiefel (1), Alexandr Tracz (20)
    2, 5, 14, 15, 16, 17, 19, 23, 25, 27, 33: Metamorphose String Orchestra, Pavel Lyubomudrov
    Violin on The Four Seasons: Yuliya Lebedenko
    Cello on 14: Mikael Samsonov
    3: Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    4: Kyiv State Symphony Orchestra, Yurii Nykonenko
    6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 44: Luke Faulkner
    8: Sarah Joy, Kathy Hohstadt
    9: Ignacy Gaydamovich, Janusz Grzelązka
    13, 49, 50: Otri Trio
    18: Ukrainian Philharmonic Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    21: Vilnius Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    22, 26, 28, 29, 30: Orchestra da Camera Fiorentina, Giuseppe Lanzetta
    31, 32: Moldavian Symphony Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    34: Giovanni Antonioni (viola), Orchestra Sinfonica Warmia, Silvano Frontalini
    35: Orchestra da Camera Fiorentina, Giuseppe Lanzetta
    36, 43: Carlo Balzaretti
    37, 40, 47: Vadim Chaimovich
    38, 39, 45: Giovanni Umberto Battel
    41, 42, 46, 48: Rogerio Tutti

    #halidonmusic #bestofclassical #classicalmasterpieces

  • Best Radio 1 • Live Radio Pop Music 2019 Best English Songs Of All Time & New Popular Songs 2019

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    Best Radio 1 • Live Radio Pop Music 2019' Best English Songs Of All Time & New Popular Songs 2019
    Other live streams please check them out and don’t forget to hit that👍and the subscribe button,enjoyy!!

    Welcome to our Channel Live Music Radio ; Our channel YouTube suggests you listening to our best radios station online 24/7. On our Radio live 24/7 you can listen to following Best Music 2018 Latest Top Hits New Pop Songs World 2020The Best Songs Of the best of songs

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  • The Story of a Flemish Farm Suite: IV. In a Belgian Café

    3:03

    Provided to YouTube by NAXOS of America

    The Story of a Flemish Farm Suite: IV. In a Belgian Café · RTÉ Concert Orchestra

    Vaughan Williams: Film Music Classics

    ℗ 2016 Naxos

    Released on: 2016-08-12

    Conductor: Andrew Penny
    Orchestra: RTÉ Concert Orchestra
    Composer: Ralph Vaughan Williams

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Willem Kersters, Symphony 2, 4th mvmt.

    6:44

    NB
    This clip replaces a previous one in which the left and right sound channels had been swapped.


    Not many Belgian composers on YouTube.
    In 1996 I recorded this performance by the Belgian Radio Philharmonic conducted by Hans Rotman of the Second Symphony (°1963) of Willem Kersters (1929-1998).

    More information on Willem Kersters:

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  • Gloomy Sunday

    2:46

    Provided to YouTube by NAXOS of America

    Gloomy Sunday (Arr. for Violin, Cello & Accordion) · Matthias Well

    Funeralissimo

    ℗ 2017 Genuin

    Released on: 2017-09-01

    Artist: Matthias Well
    Artist: Maria Well
    Artist: Zdravko Živkovic
    Composer: Anonymous
    Composer: Rezső Seress

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart – Sonata in D major, KV 311

    18:26

    Live recording from the Amerikahaus in Munich, 1981.

    W.A. Mozart – Sonata in D major, KV 311

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Henri-Jacques de Croes: La Sonate Égarée by BarrocoTout - Part VIII

    46

    BarrocoTout makes its recording debut following a prize-winning performance at the highly respected biennial York Early Music International Young Artists Competition. After a hard-fought competition Philip Hobbs, Chairman of the Judges and Linn’s Chief Producer, said: “The level of musical performance has been exceptional… BarrocoTout are an extraordinary ensemble.” Formed at the Royal Conservatoires in Brussels, the ensemble has chosen to champion the music of a hitherto neglected Belgian composer: Henri-Jacques de Croes. Treading a path between French, Italian and German influences, de Croes produced music that was courtly yet with enlightenment aspirations. The trio sonatas of Op. 5 were written with a touch of Rococo in mind and a strong Italianate flavour. With only one copy in existence the Six Sonates have hitherto led only a shadowy existence and were regarded as ‘lost’ for many years. With this recording BarrocoTout aims to quash the myth that ‘unknown is unloved’.

    CKD597
    Release date → June 2019
    Stream//Download//Buy → Coming soon

    FACEBOOK→
    TWITTER →
    INSTAGRAM →
    YOUTUBE →
    WEBSITE →

    Available from

  • x
  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart – Fantasy in D minor, KV 397

    4:59

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    W. A. Mozart – Fantasy in D minor, KV 397

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Dmitry Nilov Schindlers List Theme by John Williams

    3:43


    Arranged and performed by Dmitry Nilov

    DN Home Studio (c)
    Luthier Pavel Gavryushov

    Clips by Dmitry Nilov about classical guitar playing technique find here:

    Dmitry NILOV (classical guitar, Russia)

    - 1998 – Laureate (Fourth Prize) of the “Printemps de la guitare” contest (Walcourt, Belgium, WFMC);
    - 2002 – Laureate (Second Prize) of the “Printemps de la guitare” contest (Walcourt, Belgium, WFIMC)

    During last 15 years the musician had given several hundreds of concerts (solo and as a soloist with symphonic orchestras) in Russia, Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Belarus, Ukraine and Lithuania. He appears in the best chamber and grand concert halls of Russia and other countries (e.g. the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall (Moscow); the Grand Hall of Moscow State Conservatory, the Chamber Hall of the Moscow International Performing Arts Center, the Lysenko Academic Concert Hall of the Kiev Republican Conservatory (Ukraine); the Chamber Hall of the Minsk Republican Philharmonic Society (Belorussia); the Glinka Smaller concert hall of the Shostakovich Academic Philharmonic Society of St. Petersburg; the Grand Hall of the Vilnius Philharmonic Society (Lithuanian Republic), striving to expand the boarders of guitar music recognition as of a perfect classic instrument.
    Within this period Dmitry had turned from classic guitar repertoire to programmes based on his own arrangements of piano pieces by I. Albeniz and E. Granados and in which a whole concert part is dedicated to his arrangements of I.S. Bach’s violin pieces.

    Teaching: Despite that the performing activity was always prior for Dmitry Nilov, he combined it readily with teaching by giving consultations and master-classes for students of high schools and academies of Moscow, St. Petersburg and other cities of Russia, as well as of Germany, France, Belgium, Holland and Spain.
    Special training were also organized for professional performers, including selection of concert programs, thorough studying of fingering, detailed solution of technical problems, work with scores, with sound, purity and culture of motion, intonation expressiveness. Particular attention was paid to psychological mood before going on stage.

  • John Williams Theme from the Movie Schindlers List

    4:02

    State Youth Orchestra of Armenia (SYOA) Founded in 2005 by conductor Sergey Smbatyan, the State Youth Orchestra of Armenia (SYOA) is comprised of young musicians whose maturity to follow the right path of life, diligence and devotion to the art had a significant contribution to the establishment of the orchestra.
    Sergey Smbatyan, the artistic director and principal conductor of the orchestra, has gathered around young musicians of his age full of energy and purposefulness smoothing way for great stages and rapidly increasing international awards. Sergey Smbatyan's performing career and the musician's mastery in performing art has brought them debuts in Armenia and beyond its borders.
    SYOA has managed to enjoy popularity and high appraisal of the audience in the most prestigious concert halls in Germany, France, Russia, Belgium, Netherlands and other countries: Opera Garnier (Paris), Konzerthaus (Berlin), Dr. Anton Philipszaal (Hague), Palais des Beuax-Arts (Brussels), P.Tchaikovsky Philharmonic Concert Hall and Conservatory Great Concert Hall (Moscow), etc.
    With close-creative relations with the masters of the world stage Valery Gergiev, Krzysztof Penderecki, Vladimir Spivakov, Grigori Zhislin, Maxim Vengerov, Denis Matsuev, Vadim Repin, Vahagn Papyan, Boris Berezovsky and many others the orchestra has reached new heights in the music industry.
    Since 2007 SYOA has been the official orchestra of Aram Khachaturian International Competition.
    In 2008 on the special decision of the Government of the Republic of Armenia the orchestra was granted the title of State Orchestra for their high professionalism and expansion of contemporary music.
    The State Youth Orchestra of Armenia honorably justifies its existence. Young musicians are persistent initiators of series of charitable activities in Armenia and overseas. They always make an indivisible part of prestigious international festivals, to name a few, Moscow Easter Festival (Moscow), YOUNG.EURO.CLASSIC'' (Berlin), ''Odessa meets friends'' (Odessa), Kultursommer Nordhessen (Kassel), Young.Classic.Wratislavia (Wroclaw) and many others.
    On the 20th Anniversary of the RA Independence the Orchestra started a concert tour around Europe. Performing multi genre playlist by Armenian, Russian and west-European composers, the musicians once again inspired the audience by their professionalism.
    The wide repertoire of the orchestra ranges from classical to contemporary genre.
    Starting from 2010 the State Youth Orchestra of Armenia has been holding the Armenian Composers' Art Festival under the high patronage of the RA President.
    In 2011 the State Youth Orchestra of Armenia, headed by the artistic director and principal conductor Sergey Smbatyan, released its first CD under the title Music is the answer. Recorded at Sony DADC recording studio the CD includes works by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, Dmitri Shostakovich and Eduard Hayrapetyan.
    In 2012 the State Youth Orchestra of Armenia and the Embassy of the United States of America in Armenia implemented Youth for Youth-Hollywood Non-Stop a joint music initiative, which celebrated the 20th anniversary of U.S.-Armenian diplomatic relations.

  • Henri-Jacques de Croes: La Sonate Égarée by BarrocoTout - Part X

    50

    BarrocoTout makes its recording debut following a prize-winning performance at the highly respected biennial York Early Music International Young Artists Competition. After a hard-fought competition Philip Hobbs, Chairman of the Judges and Linn’s Chief Producer, said: “The level of musical performance has been exceptional… BarrocoTout are an extraordinary ensemble.” Formed at the Royal Conservatoires in Brussels, the ensemble has chosen to champion the music of a hitherto neglected Belgian composer: Henri-Jacques de Croes. Treading a path between French, Italian and German influences, de Croes produced music that was courtly yet with enlightenment aspirations. The trio sonatas of Op. 5 were written with a touch of Rococo in mind and a strong Italianate flavour. With only one copy in existence the Six Sonates have hitherto led only a shadowy existence and were regarded as ‘lost’ for many years. With this recording BarrocoTout aims to quash the myth that ‘unknown is unloved’.

    CKD597
    Release date → June 2019
    Stream//Download//Buy → Coming soon

    FACEBOOK→
    TWITTER →
    INSTAGRAM →
    YOUTUBE →
    WEBSITE →

    Available from

  • Unsung Composers: Héraclius Djabadary - Concerto pour piano en La Majeur, Henri Goraieb

    31:04

    Heraclius Djabadary (also spelled Erekle Dzabadari): Concerto for piano and orchestra in A major, Op.10 (1921)
    Henri Goraieb (piano), Orchestre Symphonique De RTL (Orchestra Of Radio-Tele Luxemburg), Louis De Froment (conductor)
    1. Maestoso – 0:00
    2. Adagio-Romance – 12:41
    3. Allegro-Rondo – 24:23
    Heraclius Djabadary , October 17, 1891,Tiflis(Tbilisi) - August 18, 1937, Nice, was a Georgian-French pianist and composer. Heraclius’ father Alexander was a prince and liberal newspaper editor and Georgian nationalist.
    Since 1905 he studied at the Brussels Conservatory with Arthur de Greef (piano) and François-Auguste Gevaert (theory). In 1909 he went to Vienna to study composition under the direction of Richard Heuberger, while simultaneously improving as a pianist with Julius Wolfson. March 7, 1913 he debuted in Vienna as a concert pianist with the Viennese Tonkünstler Orchestra under Oscar Nedbal, having included in the program the Georgian Rhapsody for piano and orchestra, own composition, which was a great success.
    In 1914 Djabadary left Georgia forever and later he lived in France, Austria and Switzerland.
    After the war, Margit and Heraclius (Magit Barczy was his wife and Margit, like the Djabadary family, also had nobility ancestry ) lived in Vienna from 1918-1923, according to a biography in French of the composer on an old 33-rpm recording jacket . They had wanted to live in Belgium but weren’t allowed as Margit was considered a native of an enemy state during the war.
    In 1923, the couple returned to Paris. Heraclius’ works were somewhat popular at the time in Europe. Eventually, he had 36 major works for orchestra and piano and songs; a catalog lists 164 of his works, some duplicates.

    Heraclius was sick with tuberculosis much of this time and moved to Nice, France, in 1935 for his health. He died in 1937.

    The other five Djabadary brothers besides Heraclius also were composers, conductors and musicians; one had a ballet company in Paris and another produced stage productions in Berlin.

  • Till Eulenspiegels Merry Pranks by Richard Strauss

    15:00

    Watch Richard Strauss himself conduct the piece here:

    pf: New York Philharmonic Orchestra cond/ Leonard Bernstein

    Year/Date of Composition: 1894-95 (dated May 6, 1895)
    First Performance: 1895-11-05 in Cologne, Gürzenich Konzert
    Städtische Orchester, Franz Wüllner (conductor)

    There was an actual Till Eulenspiegel, born early in the fourteenth century near Braunschweig and gone to his reward—in bed, not on the gallows as in Strauss’s tone poem—in 1350 at Mölln in Schleswig-Holstein. Stories about him have been in print since the beginning of the sixteenth century, the first English version coming out around 1560 under the title Here beginneth a merye Jest of a man that was called Howleglas (Eule in German means “owl” and Spiegel means “mirror” or “looking-glass”). The consistent and serious theme behind his jokes and pranks, often in themselves distinctly coarse and even brutal, is that of an individual getting back at society, specifically, the shrewd peasant more than holding his own against a stuffy bourgeoisie and a repressive clergy. The most famous version of Till Eulenspiegel was published in 1866 by the Belgian novelist Charles de Coster.

    Richard Strauss knew de Coster’s book, and it seems also that in 1899 in Würzburg he saw an opera called Eulenspiegel by Cyrill Kistler, a Bavarian composer whose earlier opera Kunihild had a certain currency in the 1880s and early 1890s, and for which he was proclaimed Wagner’s heir. Strauss’s first idea was to compose an Eulenspiegel opera. He sketched a scenario and later commissioned another, but somehow the project never got into gear. “I have already put together a very pretty scenario,” he wrote in a letter, “but the figure of Master Till does not quite appear before my eyes.”

    But if Strauss could not see Master Till, he could hear him, and before 1894 was out, he had begun the tone poem that he finished the following May. As always, he could not make up his mind whether he was engaged in tone painting or “just music.” To Franz Wüllner, who conducted the first performance, he wrote: “I really cannot provide a program for Eulenspiegel. Any words into which I might put the thoughts that the several incidents suggested to me would hardly suffice; they might even offend. Let me leave it, therefore, to my listeners to crack the hard nut the Rogue has offered them. By way of helping them to a better understanding, it seems enough to point out the two Eulenspiegel motifs [Strauss jots down the opening of the work and the virtuosic horn theme], which, in the most diverse disguises, moods, and situations, pervade the whole up to the catastrophe when, after being condemned to death, Till is strung up on the gibbet. For the rest, let them guess at the musical joke a Rogue has offered them.”

    On the other hand, for Wilhelm Mauke, the most diligent of early Strauss exegetes, the composer was willing to offer a more detailed scenario—Till among the market-women, Till disguised as a priest, Till paying court to pretty girls, and so forth—the sort of thing guaranteed to have the audience anxiously reading the program book instead of listening to the music, probably confusing priesthood and courtship anyway, wondering which theme represents “Till confounding the Philistine pedagogues,” and missing most of Strauss’s dazzling invention in the process. It is probably useful to identify the two Till themes, the very first violin melody and what the horn plays about fifteen seconds later, and to say that the opening music is intended as a “once-upon-a-time” prologue that returns after the graphic trial and hanging as a charmingly formal epilogue with a rowdily humorous “kicker.” (Incidentally, if you’ve ever been shown in a music appreciation class how to “tell” rondo form, forget it now.) For the rest, Strauss’s compositional ingenuity and orchestral bravura plus your attention and fantasy will see to the telling of the tale.

    Sources:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart – Sonata in F major, KV 332

    22:58

    Live recording from the Amerikahaus in Munich, 1981.

    W.A. Mozart – Sonata in F major, KV 332

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Henri-Jacques de Croes: La Sonate Égarée by BarrocoTout - Part V

    39

    BarrocoTout makes its recording debut following a prize-winning performance at the highly respected biennial York Early Music International Young Artists Competition. After a hard-fought competition Philip Hobbs, Chairman of the Judges and Linn’s Chief Producer, said: “The level of musical performance has been exceptional… BarrocoTout are an extraordinary ensemble.” Formed at the Royal Conservatoires in Brussels, the ensemble has chosen to champion the music of a hitherto neglected Belgian composer: Henri-Jacques de Croes. Treading a path between French, Italian and German influences, de Croes produced music that was courtly yet with enlightenment aspirations. The trio sonatas of Op. 5 were written with a touch of Rococo in mind and a strong Italianate flavour. With only one copy in existence the Six Sonates have hitherto led only a shadowy existence and were regarded as ‘lost’ for many years. With this recording BarrocoTout aims to quash the myth that ‘unknown is unloved’.

    CKD597
    Release date → June 2019
    Stream//Download//Buy → Coming soon

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  • Friedrich Gulda: Franz Schubert – Impromptu in G flat major Op. 90 No. 3

    4:40

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Franz Schubert – Impromptu in G flat major Op. 90 No. 3

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Fiakerlied - 1990

    1:34

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Gustav Pick - Fiakerlied (Traditional, arranged by Friedrich Gulda)

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Piano Opus 47 Belgium - James Glick

    4:50

    Opus 47 is Glick's longest, most elaborate, and ambitious work, which he wrote while traveling in Belgium.

    James Glick was a little-known avid piano player and composer in his younger days. After over four decades of obscurity, the Internet may finally bring light to this independent local musician. This is taken from the 1998 Swan Road Recording Session, in which he plays the infamous out-of-tune rustic banjo-tone piano, his signature instrument, and a common artifact of rural Pennsylvania.

    Visit the FaceBook page for more information and history:

  • x
  • 50 Greatest Pieces of Classical Music - Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin...

    4:40:37

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    50 GREATEST PIECES OF CLASSICAL MUSIC
    MOZART, BEETHOVEN, BACH, CHOPIN...

    1 Tchaikovsky - Lo Schiaccianoci: Valzer dei fiori 00:00
    2 Strauss - An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 07:04
    3 Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik, K. 525: I. Allegro 18:30
    4 Vivaldi - The Four Seasons, Spring: I. Allegro 24:31
    5 Bach - Brandenburg Concerto No. 3: I. Allegro 27:48
    6 Beethoven - Symphony No. 3 “Heroic”: I. Allegro con brio 33:38
    7 Strauss - Frühlingsstimmen, Op. 410 48:29
    8 Bizet - Carmen Suite No. 1: VI. Les Toréadors 56:03
    9 Strauss - Radetzky March, Op. 228 58:08
    10 Mendelssohn - A Midsummer Night’s Dream: Wedding March 1:00:34
    11 Mozart - Die Zauberflöte, K. 620: Ouverture 1:05:02
    12 Beethoven - Coriolan: Ouverture 1:12:16
    13 Mussorgsky - Night on Bald Mountain 1:20:15
    14 Haydn - Cello Concerto No. 2: II. Andante 1:31:31
    15 Sibelius - Andante Festivo 1:35:58
    16 Tchaikovsky - Serenade for Strings, Op. 48: II. Valse 1:40:05
    17 Saint-Saens - The Carnival of the Animals: XIII, The Swan 1:43:51
    18 Debussy - 2 Arabesques: No. 1, Andantino con moto 1:46:29
    19 Chopin - Nocturnes, Op. 9: No. 2 in E-Flat Major 1:50:36
    20 Liszt - Consolations, S. 172: No. 3, Lento placido 1:55:18
    21 Satie - Trois Gymnopedies: No. 1, Lent et doloreux 1:59:20
    22 Beethoven - Moonlight Sonata: I. Adagio sostenuto 2:02:08
    23 Mozart - Symphony No. 40: I. Molto allegro 2:07:01
    24 Rossini - Il Barbiere di Siviglia: Ouverture 2:15:14
    25 Vivaldi - The Four Seasons, Summer: III. Presto 2:22:09
    26 Mozart - Requiem, K. 626: Sequentia. Dies Irae 2:24:47
    27 Beethoven - Symphony No. 7: II. Allegretto 2:26:31
    28 Verdi - La Traviata: Addio del passato 2:35:31
    29 Puccini - Tosca: Vissi d'arte 2:42:12
    30 Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathétique: II. Allegro con grazia 2:44:51
    31 Grieg - Holberg Suite, Op. 40: I. Praeludium 2:52:48
    32 Mozart - Don Giovanni: Madamina il catalogo è questo 2:55:35
    33 Mozart - Le nozze di Figaro, K. 492, Act I: Non più andrai 3:00:56
    34 Mozart - Symphony No. 41Jupiter: IV. Molto Allegro 3:04:14
    35 Strauss - Kaiser Walzer, Op. 437 3:13:11
    36 Mozart - Piano Sonata No. 11: III. Alla Turca 3:25:04
    37 Chopin - Fantaisie-impromptu 3:28:44
    38 Rachmaninoff - Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini: Var. XVIII 3:32:52
    39 Chopin - Ballade No. 4 in F Minor, Op. 52 (Live recording) 3:35:51
    40 Schubert - Four Impromptus, Op. 90, D. 899: No. 3 in G-Flat Major (Live recording) 3:48:38
    41 Mendelssohn - Songs Without Words, Book 1, Op. 19b: No. 1, Andante con moto 3:54:46
    42 Debussy - Suite Bergamasque, L. 75: III. Clair de Lune 3:58:35
    43 Grieg - Lyric Pieces, Book I, Op. 12: No. 1, Arietta 4:03:20
    44 Tchaikovsky - The Seasons, Op. 37b: No. 6, June. Barcarolle 4:04:50
    45 Chopin - 24 Préludes, Op. 28 Raindrop: No. 15 in D-Flat Major 4:10:05
    46 Liszt - Liebesträume, S. 541: No. 3 in A-Flat Major 4:16:37
    47 Schumann - Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood), Op. 15: No. 7, Träumerei 4:22:23
    48 Chopin - Nocturne in C-Sharp Minor 4:25:39
    49 Beethoven - Bagatelle No. 25 Für Elise 4:30:25
    50 Bach - Orchestral Suite No. 3: II. Air on the G string 4:34:13

  • Waltzes From Musicals - The Pink Lady by Ivan Caryl

    6:04

    For more waltzes from the musicals, check out the playlist

    Any requests for scores, please follow the instructions in my profile. Follow this link to my profile:

    Musicals or Musical Theatre is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting, and dance. The music is often romantic and light-hearted. This genre came into prominence in the late 19th century beginning with the operettas of Offenbach and Johann Strauss II, to the satirical English musical comedies of Gilbert and Sullivan and then to the Romantic comedies of the roaring twenties.

    Ivan Caryl, whose real name was Félix Marie Henri Tilkin (12 May 1861 – 29 November 1921) was a Belgium composer of operettas and English language musicals. He was born in Belgium, but later moved to London where he became famous for his Edwardian Musicals. He also collaborated closely with Lionel Monckton, a British composer of musicals. He was also known for being one of the best dressers in London, and for his extravagant lifestyle. He later moved to New York to write Broadway Musicals. The Pink Lady is a Broadway Musical, premiered in 1911.

    This is a medley of waltzes based on a selection of songs from the musical.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin – Nocturne in F-sharp major Op. 15 No. 2

    3:34

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Frédéric Chopin – Nocturne in F-sharp major Op. 15 No. 2

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • J.H.Fiocco, Pièces de Clavecin - Jos van Immerseel

    47:35

    Jos van Immerseel is one of those rare musicians that, no matter what they play, how they play, and on what instrument they play, you never get tired of listening to. On this 1975 disc he performs work of the Belgian composer Joseph-Hector Fiocco. More below
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    These 'pièces de clavecin' are dedicated to son Altesse, Monseigneur le duc D'Arenberg, a wealthy nobleman, of which a beautiful castle in Leuven still is preserved today.

    Fiocco might be a not so well-known name. I'll give you some Wiki text below, first the track list:

    Label:
    Alpha Brussels ‎– MBM 26

    Première Suite
    A1 Adagio
    A2 Allegro
    A3 Andante
    A4 Vivace
    A5 La Plaintive
    A6 La Villageoise
    A7 L'Inconstante
    A8 L'Italienne
    A9 La Françoise

    Seconde Suite
    B1 Allemande
    B2 La Légère
    B3 Sarabande
    B4 Gigue
    B5 Gavotte Et 2ème Gavotte
    B6 Menuet Et 2ème Menuet
    B7 L'Inquiète
    B8 La Musette
    B9 La Fringante

    Harpsichord by Walter Maene (1973) after Ruckers/Taskin.

    Joseph-Hector Fiocco (20 January 1703 – 21 June 1741), born in Brussels, was a composer and Harpsichordist of the late Baroque period.

    His father, the Italian composer Pietro Antonio Fiocco, and one of his older step-brother Jean-Joseph Fiocco gave him much of his musical education.

    He also learned Greek and Latin well enough to be able to become a schoolteacher in both those subjects.

    Joseph Hector Fiocco worked under his step-brother’s direction at the Ducal Chapel of the Notre-Dame du Sablon most sources cite sometime before 1730. In 1730, Joseph Hector became sous-maitre (submaster) of the Notre-Dame du Sablon, He did not keep this position for long he resigned in 1731 to become sangmeester (choirmaster) at Antwerp Cathedral.

    At the cathedral of Antwerp (1731–37) he was in charge of the music. In 1737 he returned to his birthplace and worked in the collegiate church of St. Michel and Ste Gudule. He died in Brussels. (38 years old).[1]

    In connection with his cathedral employment, Fiocco wrote many choral works, including motets and Mass settings. Some of his most significant compositions are Lamentations du Jeudi Saint, a Missa solemnis and Pièces de Clavecin. His two suites for harpsichord were dedicated to the Duke of Arenberg, and they incorporate French and Italian styles. The first suite begins in the style of Couperin and ends with four Italian-style movements: Adagio, Allegro, Andante, and Vivace. He is also known to Suzuki violin students for his Allegro, which is part of the Book Six Suzuki violin repertoire (and has been recorded by Itzhak Perlman, among other great modern players). This piece has also been arranged for string quartet, and is sometimes heard at weddings.


    👩‍🎓 Check out my course on Keyboard Technique: 👉
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  • Linda May Han Oh: Aventurine | JAZZ NIGHT IN AMERICA

    1:3:07

    As a bassist and bandleader, Linda May Han Oh has demonstrated her gift for liquid dynamism, not only within her peer group but also with heroic elders like guitarist Pat Metheny. As a composer and arranger, Oh recently scaled up her ambitions with Aventurine, a sparkling album featuring what you might call a double quartet, though the music tells a more seamless story.

    Jazz Night in America teamed up with CapitalBop's Traveling Loft Series to present this project at NPR's Studio One in Washington, D.C. Just as she did on the album, Oh led a chamber-jazz ensemble whose jazz side consists of Greg Ward on saxophones, Matt Mitchell on piano and Ches Smith on drums and vibraphone. On the classical side were violinists Fung Chern Hwei and Curtis Stewart, violist Benni von Gutzeit and cellist Jeremy Harman. The cohesion among these musicians ran deep throughout the concert, which captures a serious talent pushing the limits — and not just her own.

    This concert was recorded at NPR's Studio One in Washington, D.C., on July 1, 2019.

    SET LIST
    00:00 - Kirigami
    10:44 - Song Yue Rao (Moon in the Pines)
    16:02 - Aventurine
    22:13 - Lilac Chaser
    28:11 - Yoda
    33:05 - Lucid Lullaby
    45:40 - Broome We Are Here
    47:33 - The Sirens Are Wailing
    55:46 - Ebony

    MUSICIANS
    Linda May Han Oh (bandleader, acoustic and electric bass)
    Greg Ward (soprano and alto saxophones)
    Matt Mitchell (piano)
    Ches Smith (drums and vibraphone)
    Fung Chern Hwei (violin)
    Curtis Stewart (violin)
    Benni von Gutzeit (viola)
    Jeremy Harman (cello)

    —————————————————————

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  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin - Barcarolle, Op. 60

    9:03

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Frédéric Chopin - Barcarolle, Op. 60

    Watch the complete programme Chopin pour ma douce:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.
    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Django Reinhardt - Greatest Hits

    1:2:03

    TRACKLIST
    01- Daphne 00:11
    02- After Youve Gone 03:22
    03- Are You In The Mood 06:31
    04- Djangology 09:21
    05- I Cant Give You Anything But Love 12:16
    06- Ise a Muggin 15:41
    07- Limehouse Blues 18:49
    08- Mabel 21:37
    09- Nagasaki 25:54
    10- Nuages 28:45
    11- Oriental Shuffle 32:15
    12- Presentation Stomp 34:56
    13- Sweet Chorus 38:04
    14- Sweet Sue Just You 40:49
    15- Les yeux noirs 43:55
    16- Place de Brouckere 46:11
    17- Shine 49:08
    18- Stardust 52:06
    19- Swing Guitars 55:18
    20- Three-Fingered Lightning 57:44

    Django Reinhardt - GREATEST HITS (FULL ALBUM)
    Download on Google Play:

    Jean Django Reinhardt ( 23 January 1910 – 16 May 1953) was a Belgian-born French jazz guitarist and composer of Romani ethnicity, regarded as one of the greatest musicians of the twentieth century, having written nearly 100 songs, according to Frank Vignola. He was the first and most significant jazz talent to emerge from Europe. Despite having two of his fingers disabled from a fire, he overcame the handicap and went on to forge an entirely new style of jazz guitar technique (sometimes called 'hot' jazz guitar), which has since become a living musical tradition within French Gypsy culture. Benny Goodman asked him to travel with his band, which he never did, but he did tour the U.S. with Duke Ellington's band in 1946. He died suddenly of a stroke at age 43. With violinist Stéphane Grappelli, Reinhardt formed the Paris-based Quintette du Hot Club de France (Hot Club) in 1934, today considered one of the most original bands in the history of recorded jazz. Reinhardt's most popular compositions have become jazz standards, including Minor Swing, Daphne, Belleville, Djangology, Swing '42, and Nuages. According to jazz guitarist Frank Vignola, nearly every major popular-music guitarist in the world has been influenced by Django, including Paul McCartney, Keith Richards and Les Paul. Over the last few decades, annual Django festivals have been held throughout Europe and the U.S., and a biography has been written about his life. In February 2017, the Berlin International Film Festival held the world premiere of the French film, Django.

    Listen to the Best Music of:
    Etta James, Billie Holiday, Bill Evans, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Nina Simone, Muddy Waters, Django Reinhardt, Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, James Brown, Chet Baker, Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington, Elvis Presley, Count Basie, Herbie Hancock, Edith Piaf, Aretha Franklin, Charlie Parker, Lightnin' Hopkins, B.B. King, Thelonious Monk, Howlin' Wolf, Quincy Jones, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Paul Anka, John Coltrane, John Lee Hooker, Coleman Hawkins, Robert Johnson, Dean Martin, Oscar Peterson, George Gershwin, Frank Sinatra, Hank Williams, Benny Goodman, Art Tatum, Joe Turner, Bing Crosby, Dave Brubeck, Mahalia Jackson, Fats Domino, Marvin Gaye, Bud Powell, Sonny Rollins, Tony Bennett... and many others!

  • Френсис Гойя Вечность - Francis Goya Eternity

    3:31

    Belgian composer, classical guitar player and producer.

  • J. Strauss I - Radetzky March

    2:35

    Check out more on

    My Classical Music Playlist:


    Johann Strauss I - Radetzky March, Op. 228

    Composer: Johann Strauss I (1804-1849)
    Radetzky March by Johann Strauss I, from Sound Off!, recorded May 18–21, 1992 at Center for the Arts, George Mason University.
    This file is in the public domain because it contains materials that originally came from the United States Marine Corps (
    Audio source:

    Image: by Josef Kriehuber (1800-1876)

  • The Radio 1 Ibiza Prom

    1:32:12

    For the first time in its 120 year history, the BBC Proms welcomed Radio 1 to turn the hallowed Royal Albert Hall in to the euphoric madness of Ibiza.

    Pete Tong, Jules Buckley and the Heritage Orchestra transformed dance classics in to orchestral masterpieces with the help of John Newman and Ella Eyre.

  • Paul Gilson: Berceuse

    3:06

    Phillip Sear plays a cradle song from around 1911 by the Flemish composer Paul Gilson (1865-1942).
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The Flemish composer Paul Gilson (1865-1942) was born in Brussels, and studied at the conservatory there - winning the Belgian Prix de Rome in 1889. He taught composition at the conservatories of Brussels and Antwerp, but after 1909 became the Belgian inspector of musical education. He wrote stage and orchestral music (for which he is best known) There are few piano works, however. This piece is headed by two extracts from the poem 'Berceuse' by the French poet and dramatist Clovis Hugues (1851-1907), the first of which is:

    Dors dans ton berceau, petite Mireille,
    Comme l'oiselet s'endort dans son nid,
    Plein d'aube vermeille;

    The second extract ends with the comment that all of the heavens can be found in the baby's blue eyes. My thumbnail shows a detail from 'By the Cradle' (1908) by the Russian artist Nicolas Tarkhoff
    (1871-1930).
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------- Played by Phillip Sear
    (Email: piano4@psear.33mail.com
    WhatsApp: )

  • The Naghash Ensemble: Lamentations on the Death of Youth

    9:10

    The Naghash Ensemble performing Lamentations on the Death of Youth live at Handelsbeurs Concert Hall in Ghent! one of Belgium’s finest concert halls. A heartrendingly beautiful poem from the 15th century on the death of the poets son who is killed in the battle.
    This song is from Songs of Exile, Written by Armenian-American composer John Hodian, The Naghash Ensemble’s “Songs of Exile” is a profound meditation on man's relationship to God from the perspective of a monk forced to live in exile for many years. Part folk music, part classical and profoundly moving.

    The Naghash Ensemble combines the earthy spirituality of Armenian folk song, new classical music, contemporary post-minimalism and the energy of rock and jazz. Three brilliant female vocalists and some of Armenia’s finest instrumentalists on duduk, oud, dhol and piano play new music based on sacred texts by the medieval Armenian mystic poet and priest, M’krtich Naghash.

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  • The Cat Concerto Music - Hungarian Rhapsody No.2 on piano Tom And Jerry music

    9:11

    The Cat Concerto Music is the Hungarian Rhapsody No.2, most famous Liszt Composition and most difficult piano piece ever made played by the Vinheteiro pianist. Because it's ridiculous difficult, this music is always played in many cartoons like Tom and Jerry, Bugs Bunny and Woody Woodpecker.
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  • Ibiza Classics - Live from The O2 london - Pete Tong, Heritage Orchestra, Jules Buckley

    1:53:45

    View the 2019 show broadcast featuring Maxi Jazz from Faithless and much more here:

    Ibiza Classics - Live from The O2 london - Pete Tong, Heritage Orchestra, Jules Buckley

  • Dmitry Nilov. Alonso Mudarra. Fantasia X

    2:09

    Clips by Dmitry Nilov about classical guitar playing technique find here:

    Ваша финансовая поддержка поможет Дмитрию создавать для вас ролики чаще:
    Яндекс Кошелек 410014005701108
    PayPal - sp.bykovsky@yandex.ru

    Support Dmitry to create more clips for you!
    PayPal - sp.bykovsky@yandex.ru



    DN Home Studio (c)

    Dmitry NILOV (classical guitar, Russia)
    - 1998 – Laureate (Fourth Prize) of the “Printemps de la guitare” contest (Walcourt, Belgium, WFMC);
    - 2002 – Laureate (Second Prize) of the “Printemps de la guitare” contest (Walcourt, Belgium, WFIMC)

    During last 15 years the musician had given several hundreds of concerts (solo and as a soloist with symphonic orchestras) in Russia, Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Belarus, Ukraine and Lithuania. He appears in the best chamber and grand concert halls of Russia and other countries (e.g. the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall (Moscow); the Grand Hall of Moscow State Conservatory, the Chamber Hall of the Moscow International Performing Arts Center, the Lysenko Academic Concert Hall of the Kiev Republican Conservatory (Ukraine); the Chamber Hall of the Minsk Republican Philharmonic Society (Belorussia); the Glinka Smaller concert hall of the Shostakovich Academic Philharmonic Society of St. Petersburg; the Grand Hall of the Vilnius Philharmonic Society (Lithuanian Republic), striving to expand the boarders of guitar music recognition as of a perfect classic instrument.
    Within this period Dmitry had turned from classic guitar repertoire to programmes based on his own arrangements of piano pieces by I. Albeniz and E. Granados and in which a whole concert part is dedicated to his arrangements of I.S. Bach’s violin pieces.

    Teaching: Despite that the performing activity was always prior for Dmitry Nilov, he combined it readily with teaching by giving consultations and master-classes for students of high schools and academies of Moscow, St. Petersburg and other cities of Russia, as well as of Germany, France, Belgium, Holland and Spain.
    Special training were also organized for professional performers, including selection of concert programs, thorough studying of fingering, detailed solution of technical problems, work with scores, with sound, purity and culture of motion, intonation expressiveness. Particular attention was paid to psychological mood before going on stage.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin - Nocturne, Op. 62 No. 1

    7:12

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Frédéric Chopin - Nocturne, Op. 62 No. 1

    Watch the complete programme Chopin pour ma douce:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.
    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart – Sonata in C minor, 2nd mov. Adagio, KV 457

    12:41

    Live recording from the Amerikahaus in Munich, 1981.

    W.A. Mozart – Sonata in C minor, 2nd mov. Adagio, KV 457

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Medieval Music - Hardcore Party Mix

    40:27

    The most rhythmic, upbeat, party medieval music out there, put together in a mix.

    0:00 La Suite Meurtriere - Vox Vulgaris
    4:25 La Segonda retroencha - Martin Best Medieval Ensemble
    5:52 Salterello [I] - Instanpitta
    11:08 Rokatanc - Vox Vulgaris
    15:01 Rassa, tan creis e monta e poia - Martin Best Medieval Ensemble
    17:01 Salterello -Trotto [II] - Instanpitta
    21:57 Spanish Bombs - Vox Vulgaris
    24:09 Au Temps D'auost - Martin Best Medieval Ensemble
    25:27 Amarcatu - Os Trabucos
    29:58 Odisete - Os Trabucos
    33:59 Tempus transit gelidum - Martin Best Medieval Ensemble
    36:42 Esek Bayrami - Vox Vulgaris

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Sonata No. 6 in D major, KV 284, 1st movement

    3:54

    Live recording from 1995
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Sonata No. 6 in D major, KV 284, 1st movement (Allegro)

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Fantasy No. 3 in D minor, KV 397

    5:15

    Live recording from 1995
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Fantasy No. 3 in D minor, KV 397

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda: J.S. Bach – Prelude & Fugue No. 17 in A-flat major, BWV 886, WTC Book II

    6:11

    In a live recording from the Amerikahaus, Munich, in 1981 Gulda reveals the versatility of his keyboard playing. On the clavichord he plays three preludes and fugues from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier; on the piano, his own re-working of Schubert's Der Wanderer, ending with Debussy's Reflects dans l'eau and a selection of his own compositions (Exercise No. 9, For Paul, Prelude and Fugue, For Rico).

    J.S. Bach – Prelude & Fugue No. 1 in C major, BWV 846, Well-Tempered Clavier I

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Claude Debussy – La fille aux cheveux de lin

    2:07

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Claude Debussy – La fille aux cheveux de lin

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Varasiddhi Vinayaka Veena Vocal Punya Srinivas

    3:36

    Punya Srinivas stromed into the carnatic instrumental music world at the tender age of 9 years on a prodigious emergence.
    Training : Grooming by Veena Vidwan Smt.Kamala Aswathama and advanced Vocal training from Sangeetha Kala Acharya Smt.Suguna Varadachari.
    Versatility :As a proof of the thrust for the versatility, she had remarkably fulfilled 5000 recordings. On this instrument , display of total command over the veena with rarest facility at play of any note from 'sa'. Her discharge of ragas and compositions reveal her sublime sensitivity for the musical expressions they deliver.Apart from Carnatic music she also experiments with different genres and styles like Hindustani and Western.Her present stint with scholarly study ensconces her as B.A.music student from University of Madras and 'Grade 5' in Western music ably guided by Mr.Augustine Paul.

    Rare Ensembles and Collaborations:
    Jugalbandhi with industrious Vocalist, Subha Mudgal and Saxophone Master Kadri Gopalnath, on a rare ensemble each, were as studs of Diamonds to emblish the record and carrer of this prodigy landing to top-ranking participations in 'Avantgarde' musical productions and rare creations.
    She has lend her mastery for a plentiful music albums collaborating with Zakkir Hussain, Sitar legend Pandit Ravishankar, Jazz musician John Mclaughlin and Mathew garrison, Illaiyaraja, A.R.Rahman, Mandolin U.Srinivas, Composer and Percussionist Ranjit Borat, Saxophone Tim Garland, Bassist Elie Afif, Pianist Aydin Esen, Ustad Rashid Khan , Singer Hariharan, Lesli Lewis and Violin legend V.S.Narasimahn are few names to mention from the list.

    Performances - India and Abroad : Besides top stardom , sabha platforms as Kamaraj Hall, Narda Gana Sabha, Indian Fine Arts Society, Sastri Hall and Music Academy - all in Chennai - the ones in Bombay, Bangalore, Culcutta, Hyderabad, Delhi and Trivandrum within India also stay thrilled by her overseas concerts and plaudits in Europe, Belgium, USA, Singapore, New York, London, Dubai, Malaysia, France, Israel and Jerusalem.

    Awards and Honors:She had affixed her stamp as an 'A Top' Grade Artiste of All India Radio .Big fm Entertainment Award for the year 2012 Carnatic Musician of the Year. ''SANGEETHA SARATHY '' Title conferred in 2013 by Sri Mata Samarpanam Trust.She is been awarded Yuva Puraskar from Sangeet Natak Academy for the year 2011.

    To predominantly mark some of Punya’s unforgettable live performances are:
    @ Solo Veena Concerto for the 50th anniversary celebrations of the United Nations Organization(UNO) in Newyork
    @ Fusion concerts at France and Paris with the world renowned London based POP Singer Suseela Raman
    @Live performance on the music written by renowned Belgian composer Hans Vermeesh at Belguim
    @The Tam-Tam festival at Jerusalem, Israel
    @ Participated in Sunaadha Pravaham-composed and conducted by the violin legend Lalgudi Sri. Jayaraman a Carnatic Classical Symphony which was premiered at famous Victoria hall, Singapore 2004.
    @Participated in the famous Earthsync music festival at Chennai as a special artiste for Veena Special Performances@ Performed along with Usthad Rashid Khan,Bombay Jayshree and Richa Sharma at Coke studio MTV as a guest atriste.
    @ Performed at Dubai World Music festival in 2013 along with Ranjit Barot, Tim Garland, Elie Afif and Aydin Esen
    @ Performed at Elephanta Caves Music Festival , the heritage of Indian music, dance, and art! Mumbai 2013.
    @ Performed at Chowmahalla Palace Hyderabad Indian Heritage Center 2013
    @ Naadaneerajanam Concert at Tirumala TTD Devastanam 2016
    @Akashvani Sangeet Sammelan , She performed her maiden concert at Shanti Niketan, Bolpur Kolkata 2016
    @SPIC MACAY 2016 Koraput Odisha, Rural school intensive concert featured along with stalwarts like Shri.T.V.Sankaranarayanan, Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt and S.Rajam.
    @SPIC MACAY Yamini 2016 Bhubaneswar , featured along with legendary musicians Pt Hariprasad Chaurasia, Vidushi Sudha Ragunathan, Vidushi Ashwini Bhide, and Gundecha Brothers .

    The Band
    Punya Srinivas-LIVE is a live band set-up of Punya Srinivas who is a wonder in the field of Carnatic instrumental music industry have created a very niche up-market for herself with her matchless style of music and creations with Veena. Punya Srinivas, can directly be put in the list of performing artists who simply understands the audience undoubtedly and perform with ease.
    Veena in Vienna which was very well apprasied and gained first -rated comments. It was a perfect creation to mark a credible proof that Indian instrument can be very well attuned to the western scores. It had 7 of the best composers in the music fraternity lend their mastery to make this album a phenomenal hit.

    Solo Albums :Veena in Vienna 2011 Sound of Swan 2014
    Albums Featuring Punya Srinivas :Chants,Mozart Meets India,Companian,BadaBoom,Laya Project,Asian Muse.

  • Renaissance Sound - Renaissance Sound II

    18:35

    Track list:
    00:00 - 01. John Benson's Beautiful Face
    04:27 - 02. Fancy Shorts
    07:20 - 03. Beautiful Belgian Bald Chicks' Ball Chins
    12:22 - 04. Warning! Sandy Cracks

    Download this EP for free on Bandcamp:


    Their Facebook:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin – Étude Op. 25, No. 7 in C-sharp minor

    4:49

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Frédéric Chopin – Étude Op. 25, No. 7 in C-sharp minor

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Claude Debussy – La puerta del vino

    2:49

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Claude Debussy – La puerta del vino

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Premier Concerto - for Alto Saxophone and Concert Band - Paul Gilson

    7:02

    Scherzando Soloworks Grade 4
    1955-14-010 S


    Paul Gilson’s Premier Concerto from 1902 is one of the first compositions for saxophone. The Belgian composer used all the typical characteristics of the instrument, such as its powerful tone, suppleness, virtuosity and warm sound. Tom de Haes has created a reconstruction based on the partly missing original version for concert band, the piano score and the version for symphony orchestra.

  • Friedrich Gulda: J. S. Bach – Prelude and Fugue No. 11 in F major, BWV 880

    3:18

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    J. S. Bach – Prelude and Fugue in F major
    (Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II)

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Ya Rayeh Sawb Bladi - Nizar Rohana

    7:08

    Album: Narration/Sard
    Artist: Nizar Rohana
    Year: 2008
    Duration: 45:32

    Modern compositions for Oud and other instruments such as Double Bass, Qanoun and Percussion,Sard (Narration, in Arabic) is a unique music production from Palestine. In it the authenticity of the oud language is highly maintained, yet refreshing new expressions and rhythms are achieved through the dialogues with other instruments such as the double bass, the qanoun and the percussion.
    Nizar Rohana is a prominent Oud player in the Palestinian musical scene. Rohana was born in the village of 'Esefya on Mount Carmel in 1975. Nizar began his musical journey at an early age by playing the piano. At the age of fifteen, he discovered his father's old Oud and since then he has been exploring his own Arab and eastern musical heritage. In 1996 he moved to Jerusalem to take up academic studies. Focusing his research on the music of the great Egyptian composer Mohammad el-Qasabji, Rohana completed his Masters degree in Musicology 2006.
    Rohana's experience as a performer is very rich and he has been playing in different groups and in different formats of Arabic classical, experimental and world music.
    Together with an intensive activity on the local musical scene, during the last ten years Rohana has been performing in many countries around the world such as Japan, Morocco, Egypt, United States, Spain, England, Italy, France, Denmark, Germany, Holland, Belgium, Portugal and Switzerland.

    Nizar Rohana launched his first music album Sard (Narration in Arabic) in May 2008. In it the authenticity of the oud language is highly maintained, yet refreshing new expressions and rhythms are achieved through the dialogues with other instruments such as the double bass, the qanoun and the percussion.

    The album includes five pieces composed by Nizar Rohana: Sard, Umm El Zeinat, Iraq, Ajam, and Hijaz. In addition, two familiar tunes were specially arranged for this recording: Sama'i Farahfaza by Jamil Al-Tanbouri (arranged by Khaled Jubran), and Ya rayeh sawb bladi by Ahmad Qaabour.

    The participating musicians on the album are :
    Nizar Rohana -- oud, Hani Assad -- percussion, Geoffroi Delori -- double bass, Waffa Zaghal -- qanoun and Khaled Jubran -- musical supervision.

    This production was partly financed by Cultural Resource (Egypt) in collaboration with Al-Urmawi Centre (Palestine).

    Track List:
    1 - Sard (Narration) (06:14) سرد
    2 - Emm el Zeinat (06:32) أم الزينات
    3 - Ajam (08:02) عجم
    4 - Iraq (04:56) عراق
    5 - Sama'i Farahfaza (06:27) سماعي فرحفزا
    6 - Hijaz (06:22) حجاز
    7 - Ya rayeh sawb bladi (07:03) يارايح صوب بلادي

    For More Music:

  • 💧 River Flows in You - Yiruma - Piano cover - Artemis 🎹

    3:22

    ✖️ Yiruma River Flows In You | Yiruma River Flows In You Piano | Yiruma River Flows In You Cover | Yiruma River Flows In You Music Video | Yiruma River Flows In You Instrumental ✖️
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