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Playlist of Johann Strauss, Jr

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  • Strauss II - Waltzes, Polkas & Operettas | Classical Music Collection

    2:47:19

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    STRAUSS II
    WALTZES, POLKAS & OPERETTAS

    01. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen), Waltz Op. 410 00:00
    02. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden), Waltz Op. 388 07:31
    03. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der schönen blauen Donau), Waltz Op. 314 17:11
    04. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz Op. 234 28:35
    05. Treasure Waltz (Schatz-Walzer), Op. 418 37:29
    06. Where the Lemon Trees Bloom (Wo die Citronen blüh'n), Waltz Op. 346 45:53
    07. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz Op. 443 55:36
    08. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons), Waltz Op. 307 01:05:32
    09. Artist's Life (Künstlerleben) Waltz Op. 316 01:14:56
    10. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz Op. 325 01:25:18
    11. Wine, Women and Song (Wein, Weib und Gesang) Waltz Op. 333 01:38:04
    12. Morning Journals (Morgenblätter), Op. 279 01:43:40
    13. Love Songs (Liebeslieder), Waltz Op. 114 01:54:48
    14. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz Op. 354 02:04:20
    15. Annen-Polka Op. 117 02:13.33
    16. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka Op. 319 02:16:36
    17. Tritsch-Tratsch Polka Op. 214 02:19:17
    18. Thunder & Lightning (Unter Donner und Blitz) Polka Op. 324 02:21:50
    19. Long live the Magyar (Éljen a Magyar! ), Polka Op. 332 02:24:53
    20. The Gypsy Baron: Ouverture 02:27:38
    21. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: March. Hurrah, die Schlacht 02:29:55
    22. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: Finale. Reich' ihm die Hand 02:32:44
    23. Persian March, Op. 289 02:33:47
    24. Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 02:36:04
    25. The Bat (Die Fledermaus): Ouverture 02:38:58

    Tracks 1-2, 10 & 25 performed by Vilnius Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 3, 20 & 22 performed by Donetsk Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 4-9, 11-19 & 23-24 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    Track 21 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Donetsk Chorus, Stefan Marzcik

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    #classicalmusic #strauss #waltz #polka #operetta

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  • The best of Johann Strauss II

    1:13:51

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    Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)


    1.Voices of Spring, Op. 410, 0:00
    2.Tritsch-Tratsch Polka, Op. 214 6:59
    3.Emperor Waltz, Op. 437 9:42
    4.Annen Polka, Op. 117 21:45
    5.Enjoy Your Life, Waltz, Op. 340 24:46
    6.Egyptian March, Op. 335 33:10
    7.Vienna Blood Waltz, Op. 354 37:18
    8.Thunder & Lightning, Op. 324 46:47
    9.Die Fledermaus Waltz, Op. 367 50:06
    10.Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 57:00
    11.Bandit's Gallop, Op. 276 1:00:09
    12.Blue Danube, Op. 314 1:02:57

  • x
  • The Best of Strauss

    1:58:01

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    THE BEST OF STRAUSS II

    01. Emperor Waltz (Kaiser-Walzer) Op. 437 00:00
    02. Strauss I - Radetzky March Op. 228 11:57
    03. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen) Waltz, Op. 410 14:54
    04. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der Schönen Blauen Donau) Waltz, Op. 314 21:49
    05. Chit-Chat (Tritsch-Tratsch) Polka, Op. 214 32:42
    06. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 35:21
    07. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons) Waltz, Op. 307 44:10
    08. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz, Op. 325 53:46
    09. Love Songs (Liebeslieder) Waltz, Op. 114 1:06:20
    10. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden) Waltz, Op. 388 1:15:10
    11. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz, Op. 443 1:24:26
    12. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz, Op. 234 1:33:56
    13. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 1:42:55
    14. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka, Op. 139 1:52:21
    15. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 234 1:55:06
    16. Polka Schnell, Op. 281 1:57:49

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    The very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Ravel, Dvorák…

    #classicalmusic #classical #waltz #strauss

  • Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz

    10:59

    Disscuss/Review The Blue Danube Waltz at

    Title : Johann Strauss II , The Blue Danube Waltz
    Date : 1867

    From Wikipedia,The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau op. 314 (On the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by Johann Strauss II, composed in 1867. Originally performed 9 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men's Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success, however, and Strauss is reputed to have said The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda -- I wish that had been a success!

    The waltz originally had an accompanying song text written by Josef Weyl. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World's Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion.

    The sentimental Viennese connotations of the piece have made it into a sort of unofficial Austrian national anthem. It is a traditional encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year's Concert. The first few bars are also the interval signal of Osterreich Rundfunk's overseas programs.

    It is reported by composer Norman Lloyd in his Golden Encyclopedia of Music that when asked by Frau Strauss for an autograph, the composer Johannes Brahms autographed Mrs. Strauss's fan by writing on it the first few bars of the Blue Danube. Under it he wrote Unfortunately not by Johannes Brahms.The work commences with an extended introduction in the key of A major with shimmering (tremolo) violins and a French horn spelling out the familiar waltz theme, answered by staccato wind chords, in a subdued mood. It rises briefly into a loud passage but quickly dies down into the same restful nature of the opening bars. A contrasting and quick phrase in D major anticipates the waltz before 3 quiet downward-moving bass notes usher in the first principal waltz melody.

    The first waltz theme is familiar gently rising triad motif in cellos and horns in the tonic D major, accompanied by harps; the Viennese waltz beat is accentuated at the end of each 3-note phrase. The Waltz 1A triumphantly ends its rounds of the motif, and waltz 1B follows in the same key; the genial mood is still apparent.

    Waltz 2A glides in quietly (still in D major) before a short contrasting middle section in B flat major. The entire section is repeated.

    A more dour waltz 3A is introduced in G major before a fleeting eighth-note melodic phrase (waltz 3B). An loud Intrada (introduction) is then played. Waltz 4A starts off in a romantic mood (F major) before a more joyous waltz 4B in the same key.

    After another short Intrada in A, cadencing in F-sharp minor, sonorous clarinets spell out the poignant melody of waltz 5A in A. Waltz 5B is the climax, punctuated by cymbal crashes. Each of these may be repeated at the discretion of the performer.

    The coda recalls earlier sections (3A and 2A) before furious chords usher in a recap of the romantic Waltz 4A. The idyll is cut short as the waltz hurries back to the famous waltz theme 1A again. This statement is cut short, however, by the final codetta: a variation of 1A is presented, connecting to a rushing eighth-note passage in the final few bars: repeated tonic chords underlined by a snare drumroll and a bright-sounding flourish.

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  • The Blue Danube

    10:58

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    The Blue Danube · Johann Strauss, Jr.

    Classical Wedding Album

    ℗ 2008 Big Eye Records

    Released on: 2008-01-01

    Composer: Johann Strauss, Jr.

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Strauss II - Greatest Waltzes Collection

    2:25:57

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    STRAUSS II
    Greatest Waltzes Collection

    01 Schatz-Walzer (Treasure Waltz) Op. 418 00:00
    02 Rosen aus dem Süden (Roses from the South) Op. 388 08:25
    03 Frühlingsstimmen (Voices of Spring), Op. 410 18:07
    04 Wein, Weib und Gesang (Wine, Women and Song) Op. 333 25:40
    05 An der Schonen Blauen Donau (On the Beautiful Blue Danube) Op. 314 31:18
    06 Kaiser Walzer (Emperor Waltz), Op. 437 42:42
    07 Wiener Bonbons (Vienna Sweets) Waltz Op. 307 54:36
    08 Wo die Citronen Blüh'n! (Where the Lemon Trees Bloom), Op. 364 1:04:02
    09 Seid umschlungen, Millionen! (Be Embraced, You Millions!) Waltz Op. 443 1:13:48
    10 Accellerationen (Accelerations) Waltz, Op. 234 1:23:49
    11 Künstlerleben (Artist’s Life) Op. 316 1:32:44
    12 Morgenblätter (Morning Journals), Op. 279 1:43:10
    13 Wiener Blut (Viennese Blood) Op. 354 1:54:20
    14 Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald (Tales from the Vienna Woods) Op. 325 2:03:36
    15 Liebeslieder (Love Songs) Op. 114 2:16:24

    1, 4, 8-13: performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    2, 3, 6 & 14: performed by Vilnius Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    5 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    15 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    All the best classical music ever on Halidon Music Youtube Channel: the very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Dvorák…

    #classicalmusic #classical #straussii

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  • Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    8:31

    Discuss/review/recommend the work at

    Title : Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    From Wikipedia,
    Die Fledermaus (in English: The Bat;' in French: La Chauve-souris') is an operetta composed by Johann Strauss II to a German libretto by Carl Haffner and Richard Genée.

    The original source for Die Fledermaus is a farce by German playwright Julius Roderich Benedix (1811--1873), Das Gefängnis (The Prison). Another source is a French vaudeville play, Le réveillon, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. This was first translated by Carl Haffner into a non-musical play to be produced in Vienna. However, the peculiarly French custom of the réveillon (a midnight supper party) caused problems, which were solved by the decision to adapt the play as a libretto for Johann Strauss, with the réveillon replaced by a Viennese ball. At this point Haffner's translation was handed over for adaptation to Richard Genée, who subsequently claimed not only that he had made a fresh translation from scratch but that he had never even met Haffner.

    The operetta premièred on April 5, 1874 at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna, Austria and has been part of the regular operetta repertoire ever since. It currently appears as number 19 on Opera America's list of the 20 most-performed operatic works in North America.

  • Johann STRAUSS - The Greatest Hits

    1:14:06

    Johann Strauss - The Greatest Hits (Full album) 2014 / FULL HD
    State Symphony Orchestra of the USSR Ministry of Culture & Pavel Kogan

    01. Sounds of Spring Waltz, Op. 410
    02. Viennese Waltz, Op. 307
    03. Backgammon Polka, Op. 214
    04. Radetzky March, Op. 228
    05. Blue Danube, Op. 314
    06. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 449
    07. The Gypsy Baron Quadrille, Op. 422
    08. Polka-Mazurka, Fata Morgana, Op. 330
    09. In Krapfenvale, Op. 336
    10. A woman's heart, Op. 166
    11. Feast of Fire, Polka, Op. 269
    12. Artist's Life, Op. 316
    13. Hunting Polka, Op. 373
    14. You are my treasure, Op. 418
    15. Polka thunder and lightning, Op. 324
    16. Vienna, woman and song, Op. 333

  • The Blue Danube Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr

    9:56

    The Blue Danube Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr

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  • Voices Of Spring Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr.

    5:56

    Voices Of Spring Waltz

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Isyana Sarasvati - Opera Arias - Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, Op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    7:55

    Jakarta Concert Orchestra
    Avip Priatna, konduktor
    Isyana Sarasvati, sopran

    Konser LIVE Invitation To The Dance, 2018. Di Ciputra Artpreneur Theater, Jakarta Selatan.

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  • Johann Strauss II - Voices of Spring Waltz

    5:33

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

    In its purely orchestral version the Frühlingsstimmen Walzer was played for the first time on 18 March 1883 when the composer's brother, Eduard Strauss, conducted it with the Strauss Orchestra at one of his regular Sunday afternoon concerts in the Goldene Saal (Golden Hall) of the Musikverein building in Vienna. This première also met with great success and the waltz had to be encored.

  • Johann Strauss:Emperor Waltz Op. 437

    11:56

    Berliner Philharmoniker

  • Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka - Johann Strauss II

    2:39

    Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, Polka schnell Op. 214 von Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)

  • Johann Strauss II - Tales from the Vienna Woods Waltz

    11:01

    The decorative first piano edition of Johann Strauss's evocative waltz Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald carries the composer's respectful dedication to his Highness Prince Constantin Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (1828-1896), and the work was almost certainly given its world première at a private soirée in the prince's 16th-century palace in the Augarten, Vienna, during summer 1868. An undated letter from that year, written to the composer by Princess Marie Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, reads: Dear Sir, The performance of your beautiful waltz gave me such pleasure recently -- that I cannot help asking you kindly to accept a small memento of the unforgettable evening. It is to remind you of another of your finely-chiselled masterpieces, by the blue Danube -- whose sound reminds us all of happy hours. With repeated thanks and greatest respect. Fürstin zu Hohenlohe. (The nature of the Princess's memento is unfortunately not known). Since May 1867 Prince Constantin had held the position of First Master of the Royal Household and had lived in the Augarten residence with his wife Marie (née Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein), the daughter of Franz Liszt's long-term mistress Princess Carolyne Wittgenstein. Through Marie's connections the Augarten Palace, situated on the opposite side of the Danube Canal from the inner city of Vienna, became a focal point of cultural life in the Austrian capital. (After the Second World War it became, and has remained, the home of the Vienna Boys' Choir).

    On 22 June 1868 Johann Strauss conducted a public performance of Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald before an audience of five thousand at the 'Sommerliedertafel' (Summer Song Programme) of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) held in Karl Schwender's 'Neue Welt' entertainment establishment in the Vienna suburb of Hietzing. Yet this was no public première: three days earlier in the Volksgarten, at an 'Extraordinary Novelty Festival with Fireworks, for the Benefit of Josef and Eduard Strauss' on 19 June, Johann himself conducted the new work to great applause and was obliged to repeat it four times. A particularly strong impression was made by the waltz's expansive Introduction of 122 bars, a rustic tone-poem evocative of the countryside of the Wienerwald, the wooded eastern foothills of the Alps, situated just north-west of Vienna. It is curious to reflect, therefore, that at no time in his life did the composer himself undertake walks in the Vienna Woods -- indeed, he expressed a lifelong fear of climbing even the most gentle of hills! Through the use of zither (replaced on this recording by an optional string ensemble) and Ländler-style rhythms in the Introduction and Coda, Strauss emphasises the close ties between the Viennese Waltz and the peasant music of Lower Austria. A zither-player pictured in a vignette on the cover of the first piano edition further underlines this connection, while the artist also depicts other commonplace scenes and pleasures to be enjoyed in the countryside -- shooting on a rifle range, a pair of lovers enjoying rural seclusion, and young men bowling at an outdoor skittle alley.

  • Johann Strauss Jr - Wine, Women and Song

    6:26

    Johann Strauss Jr

    Wine Women and Song

  • Johann Strauss II - Roses from the South Waltz

    8:50

    It was an eventful evening; the house was filled to the gables in order to hear a new work by our Strauss

    So wrote the Fremdenblatt newspaper (3 October) in its review of the highly successful première of Johann Strauss's operetta Das Spitzentuch der Königin ('The Queen's Lace Handkerchief'), which opened at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on 1 October 1880. The composer himself, though delighted by the reception accorded his latest stage work, was unconvinced that it would enjoy a lasting success. But he had no such doubts about the magnificent orchestral waltz, Rosen aus dem Süden, which he had hurriedly assembled from themes in his operetta, and whose piano edition his publisher, Cranz, was able to advertise in the press (together with the first Spitzentuch potpourri) just four days after the theatrical première! The honour of conducting the first performance of Rosen aus dem Süden fell to Johann's brother, Eduard, who was still on a concert tour of Germany when Spitzentuch received its première. Not until 7 November, therefore, at Eduard's Sunday afternoon concert in the Musikverein, did the waltz begin its triumphant conquest of the world, comprising, as it did, many of the musical highlights from the operetta. Two numbers which had drawn especial praise from the Spitzentuch first-night reviewers were the King's Act 1 Trüffel-Couplet (Stets kommt mir wieder in den Sinn -- the refrain of which Strauss claimed he had rewritten twelve times!) and Cervantes's Act 2 Romance, Wo die wilde Rose erblüht, and these both appear in Rosen aus dem Süden, as Waltz 1 and Waltz 2A respectively.

  • Vienna Blood Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr.

    7:11

    Vienna Blood Waltz

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Johann Strauss II. - Geschichten aus dem Wiener Wald

    7:39



    This is my personal favourite orchestral version of this terrific masterpiece. Played by Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Conductor: Robert Stolz (!)

    Robert Stolz himself is known as the last composer of the classical viennese aera. He was the one who knew best how a Strauss waltz has to be arranged and how the orchestra has to play it. That's why I adore this recording so much! It's 100% authentic and even the Vienna Philharmonics won't do it better.

    I had to shorten the track coz it was longer than 10 minutes. The intro has been removed. But never mind, the zither theme of the intro is played again at the end of the waltz.

    ___________________

    Tales from the Vienna woods
    ウィーンの森の物語
    小约翰·施特劳斯
    योहान स्ट्रॉस दुसरा
    ヨハン・シュトラウス2世

  • Strauss II - 10 facts about Johann Strauss II | Classical Music History

    3:52

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    ...who some of his friends and admirers were?
    ...who destroyed much of his original manuscripts and why?

    Johann Strauss II
    An der schönen blauen Donau (The Blue Danube) op. 314
    Performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra
    Conducted by Silvano Frontalini

    Learn more interesting & fun facts about the lives of the greatest classical music composers!
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  • Johann Strauss - Overture Die Fledermaus

    8:58

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Overture Die Fledermaus

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen Waltz, Op. 410 Voices of Spring

    8:37

    Zygmunt Nitkiewicz - conductor
    Symphony Orchestra of The Józef Marcin Żebrowski Music School in Częstochowa, Poland
    La Folle Journée de Varsovie
    recorded at Polish National Opera House in Warsaw, september 27, 2016

  • Johann Strauss II - An der schönen, blauen Donau - Walzer, Op. 314

    9:40

    It is interesting to reflect that Johann Strauss II's An der schönen blauen Donau (By the beautiful blue Danube), the most famous of all orchestral waltzes, was conceived and first performed as a showpiece for male voice choir. The work was Johann's first choral waltz, written as a commission for the Wiener Mannergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) with whom he was to enjoy a close association over the years, creating for the choir a total of six choral master waltzes, two polkas and a march.

    Strauss began sketching themes for the waltz, which would eventually bear the title An der schönen blauen Donau, in autumn 1866, and originally submitted to the Association a four-part unaccompanied chorus comprising just four waltz sections and a brief Coda, but without Introduction. A hastily written piano accompaniment followed soon afterwards, and then a fifth waltz section. The orchestral accompaniment, together with the distinctive Introduction, was provided only shortly before the first performance which took place at Vienna's Dianabad-Saal ballroom during the Association's Faschings-Liedertafel (Carnival Programme of Songs) on 15 February 1867. In the absence of the composer, who was appearing with the Strauss Orchestra at the Imperial Court on the night of the première, the members of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein were conducted by their chorus-master, Rudolf Weinwurm, and accompanied by the orchestra of the 'Georg V, König von Hannover' Infantry Regiment No. 42, which was temporarily stationed in Vienna. The original, satirical, text had been furnished by the Association's own 'house poet', Josef Weyl (1821-95), although a new text was added in 1890 by Franz von Gernerth (1821-1900) which was more suited to non-carnival occasions and commenced with the now familiar words: Donau so blau ... (Danube so blue...)

    The Viennese were treated to the first purely orchestral rendition of An der schönen blauen Donau - complete with Introduction and full-length Coda - on Sunday 10 March 1867 in the Volksgarten at the Strauss Orchestra's annual Carnival Revue, which took the form a Benefit Concert by Josef and Eduard Strauss, with the participation of Johann Strauss, Imperial-Royal Court Ball Music Director. This date is further confirmed by an entry in Josef Strauss's diary. Johann himself conducted this performance of his waltz, which featured as the third item on a programme presenting no less than twenty-four novelties composed for that year's carnival celebrations by the three Strauss brothers. Perhaps surprisingly, in view of the unanimous praise lavished by the Viennese press upon the choral première of the work, the orchestral version of An der schönen blauen Donau did not attract special attention from the critics, the Neues Fremden-Blatt (11.03.1867) merely noting that every piece met with the most undivided applause, which now and then increased to tempestuous enthusiasm, and everything had to be repeated. The three brothers celebrated in this concert the greatest triumph in the sphere of Viennese dance music.

    During the 1867 Carnival, An der schönen blauen Donau was merely regarded as a pearl amongst many others, and only a little later did the unique position which it was to assume, and maintain, as the unofficial national anthem of both Vienna and Austria, become evident. The new waltz was in the composer's luggage which he took with him to Paris in summer 1867, where it was played on 28 May at the glittering Austrian Embassy Ball given by the Ambassador, Prince Richard Metternich, and his wife, Princess Pauline, benefiting considerably from an attendance by the élite of international society. An Englishwoman who was present at this event, Mrs Charles Moulton (later Madame de Hegermann-Lindencrone), wrote home enthusiastically the following day: The famous Johann Strauss, brought from Vienna especially for this occasion, stood waiting with uplifted baton and struck up the 'Blue Danube', heard for the first time in Paris... And how Strauss played it!... With what fire and 'entrain'!. It did not take long for the reputation of the work to spread much further afield, and on 1 July 1867 Theodore Thomas conducted its first American performance in New York with his own orchestra, an ensemble which later became the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. A little less than twelve weeks later, on 21 September 1867, the composer conducted the British première of the work (in a choral version with a 100-strong male voice choir) at London's Royal Italian Opera House, Covent Garden, afterwards noting in his diary: tremendous tumult and rejoicing!!!.

    Conductor: Franz Welser-Most
    Orchestra: London Philarmonic Orchestra

  • Patricia JANEČKOVÁ: Mein Herr Marquis

    3:42

    Johann Strauss II: Mein Herr Marquis (Die Fledermaus)
    Soprano: Patricia JANEČKOVÁ - New Years Concert in Vienna Style“

    Janáček Philharmonic Ostrava, Chief conductor: Heiko Mathias Förster
    January 7, 2016, Ostrava, Czech Republic

  • Johann Strauss - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka

    3:31

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz

    8:27

    It is interesting to reflect that Johann Strauss II's An der schönen blauen Donau ('By the beautiful Blue Danube'), the most famous of all orchestral waltzes, was conceived and first performed as a showpiece for male voice choir. The work was Johann's first choral waltz, written as a commission for the Wiener Männergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) with whom he was to enjoy a close association over the years, creating for the choir a total of six choral master waltzes, two polkas and a march.

    Strauss began sketching themes for the waltz, which would eventually bear the title An der schönen blauen Donau, in autumn 1866, and originally submitted to the Association a four-part unaccompanied chorus comprising just four waltz sections and a brief Coda, but without Introduction. A hastily written piano accompaniment followed soon afterwards, and then a fifth waltz section. The orchestral accompaniment, together with the distinctive Introduction, was provided only shortly before the first performance which took place at Vienna's Dianabad-Saal ballroom during the Association's Faschings-Liedertafel (Carnival Programme of Songs) on 15 February 1867. In the absence of the composer, who was appearing with the Strauss Orchestra at the Imperial Court on the night of the première, the members of the Wiener Mannergesang-Verein were conducted by their chorus-master, Rudolf Weinwurm, and accompanied by the orchestra of the 'Georg V, König von Hannover' Infantry Regiment No. 42, which was temporarily stationed in Vienna. The original, satirical, text had been furnished by the Association's own 'house poet', Josef Weyl (1821-95), although a new text was added in 1890 by Franz von Gernerth (1821-1900) which was more suited to non-­carnival occasions and commenced with the now familiar words: Donau so blau... (Danube so blue...)

    The Viennese were treated to the first purely orchestral rendition of An der schnen blauen Donau -- complete with Introduction and full-length Coda -- on Sunday 10 March 1867 in the Volksgarten at the Strauss Orchestra's annual Carnival Revue, which took the form a Benefit Concert by Josef and Eduard Strauss, with the participation of Johann Strauss, Imperial-Royal Court Ball Music Director. This date is further confirmed by an entry in Josef Strauss's diary. Johann himself conducted this performance of his waltz, which featured as the third item on a programme presenting no less than twenty-four novelties composed for that year's carnival celebrations by the three Strauss brothers. Perhaps surprisingly, in view of the unanimous praise lavished by the Viennese press upon the choral première of the work, the orchestral version of An der schönen blauen Donau did not attract special attention from the critics, the Neues Fremden-Blatt (11.03.1867) merely noting that every piece met with the most undivided applause, which now and then increased to tempestuous enthusiasm, and everything had to be repeated. The three brothers celebrated in this concert the greatest triumph in the sphere of Viennese dance music.

  • Johann Strauss Jr - Treasure Waltz

    8:41

    Johann Strauss Jr

    Treasure Waltz

  • Johann Strauss II – Persian March, Op. 289 conducted by Maciej Tomasiewicz

    2:51

    Special Winners Concert of 3rd Polish Nationwide Music Schools' Symphonic Orchestras Competition
    Audition Award - Polish Youth Symphony Orchestra in Bytom, Maciej Tomasiewicz - conductor
    Zdobywca nagrody publiczności - Polska Młodzieżowa Orkiestra Symfoniczna –
    Orkiestra Ogólnokształcącej Szkoły Muzycznej I i II stopnia im. Fryderyka Chopina w Bytomiu,
    pod dyrekcją Macieja Tomasiewicza
    #MaciejTomasiewicz #Strauss

  • Johann Strauss II - Thunder and Lightning Polka

    3:10

    Esteemed Sirs! I have the honour of placing before the honoured Committee the title of 'Sternschnuppe' for a composition, specifically a 'schnellpolka', intended for the Hesperus Ball. Yours respectfully, Johann Strauss.

    Thus runs the text of an undated letter to the Vienna Artists' Association, 'Hesperus', written on behalf of the composer by his wife, Jetty, but signed by Strauss himself. Research suggests that this correspondence dates from 18 January 1868. On 6 February that year the Neues Wiener Tagblatt announced: For the Hesperus Ball, which takes place on Sunday 16th of this month in the Dianasaal, Messrs Johann, Josef and Eduard Strauss have promised 3 novelties with the titles: 'Sternschnuppe', 'Extempore' and 'Freie Gedanken'. This is the very last mention of Johann's Schnell-Polka Sternschnuppe (Shooting Star), and it raises some interesting questions.

    The Hesperus Ball took place, as announced, on 16 February 1868 in the Dianabad-Saal; with the brothers Johann, Josef and Eduard taking it in turns to conduct the Strauss Orchestra. Although the Viennese press reported on the festivity, none detailed the music played. Ten days later, on 26 February, the Viennese press carried advertisements for the traditional Carnival Revue of all the compositions written for that year's Vienna Carnival by the Strauss brothers, organised for 1 March in the Blumensäle (Floral Halls) of the k.k. Gartenbaugesellschaft (Imperial-Royal Horticultural Association). Adopting the long-established procedure, the announcement chronicles the balls at which the various works were first presented, but in the 1868 list no details appear beside Johann's carnival compositions. As might be expected, alongside the entries for Josef's Extempore, Polka française (op. 241) and Eduard's waltz Freie Gedanken (op. 39) appears Hesperus Ball. Moreover, under Johann's list of contributions one searches in vain for any mention of Sternschnuppe. Of the total 20 new dances featured on the programme of the 1868 Revue, given as a benefit concert for Josef and Eduard Strauss and with the participation of Johann, 10 were contributed by Josef, 7 by Eduard and only 3 by Johann. Specifically the Waltz King's tally comprises the waltz Die Publicisten (op. 321, actually written for the Concordia Ball on 4 February), the polka-mazurka Ein Herz, ein Sinn (op. 323, for the Citizens' Ball on 11 February) and a quick polka entitled - Unter Donner und Blitz. (In some newspapers the work is identified as Unter Blitz und Donner.) As to the identity of this last-mentioned work, not until the appearance of press announcements for a 'Ladies' Night', hosted by the Hesperus in the Blumensäle on Saturday 7 March 1868, and attended by some 1,100 guests, does a solution to the mystery present itself. In brackets, alongside the eighth item on the concert programme - Unter Donner und Blitz, Polka schnell - appears the supplementary information: Hesperus, clearly indicating that the piece had been performed at an earlier festivity of the Association. Since in early 1868 there were no balls or concerts to which this reference could apply other than the ball on 16 February, one must conclude that this dance composition was played for the first time at the Hesperus Ball in the Dianabad-Saal. Yet this conclusion provides only a partial solution, for known contemporary press sources cannot confirm whether the polka was heard at its première as Unter Donner und Blitz, Sternschnuppe or even Unter Blitz und Donner (as Josef and Eduard refer to the piece in their handwritten programme for the Hesperus 'Ladies' Night'). For his part, however, Josef Strauss noted in his diary among the new works being first performed at the Hesperus Ball: Unter Donner und Blitz.

  • Johann Strauss II. - Eine Nacht in Venedig

    7:05


    ...

    A night in Venice (Ouverture)
    ________________________________


    #1 im Programm des Neujahrskonzerts 2009 in Wien
    #1 of New Year's Concert 2009 in Vienna
    #1 ニューイヤーコンサート 2009

  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, op. 410

    6:00

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

  • Vozes da Primavera-valsa de Johann Strauss Jr. - wmv

    7:36

    Lindas imagens da primavera em flor- web- montagem de vídeo Stela Soares

  • Frühlingsstimmen op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    5:48

    Frühlingsstimmen, walzer op. 410 (Voices of Spring). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).

  • Johann Strauss - Wiener Blut, Waltz

    9:06

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Wiener Blut, Waltz

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II

    4:06

    Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II

  • Johann Strauss II - Morgenblätter - Walzer, Op. 279

    10:18

    During the course of a working visit to Vienna in late autumn 1863, Jacques Offenbach (1819-80) presented the Vienna Authors' and Journalists' Association, 'Concordia', with an un-named waltz dedication for their ball in the Sofienbad-Saal to be held on 12 January of the following year. Since the Strauss Orchestra was engaged for the 'Concordia' Ball, Johann was also obliged to provide a dedication composition of his own. Aware of Offenbach's involvement, he likewise left it to the Association to provide an appropriate name for his waltz. When the committee chose to entitle Offenbach's work Abendblätter (Evening Papers) and Strauss's Morgenblätter (Morning Papers) an element of friendly rivalry was assured on the evening of the ball. Offenbach, however, was not present at the festivity, and Johann conducted the premières of both waltzes. In the event, the first night press did not pronounce in favour of either work, but subsequent performances of the excellent Abendblätter found little favour in Vienna, whereas Morgenblätter has retained its popularity in orchestral repertoire.

    Conductor: Zubin Mehta
    Orchestra: Wiener Philharmoniker

  • Wo die Zitronen blühn op. 364 - Johann Strauss II

    9:22

    Wo die Zitronen blühn, walzer op. 364 (Where the Lemons Blossom). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).

  • Johann Strauss II. - Der Zigeunerbaron

    8:13

    The Gypsy Baron, Overture


    ________________________________

    #7 im Programm des Neujahrskonzerts 2009 in Wien
    #7 of New Year's Concert 2009 in Vienna
    #7 ニューイヤーコンサート 2009

  • Accelerationen op. 234 - Johann Strauss II

    8:35

    Accelerationen op. 234 (Acceleration). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).
    Conductor: Lorin Maazel & Wiener Philharmoniker

  • Johann Strauss II - Im Krapfenwaldl - Polka-française, op. 336

    4:00

    First performed under the title Im Pavlovsk-Walde ('In the Woods of Pavlovsk'), this now-familiar French polka caused a sensation when the composer first played it at an open-air benefit concert in Pavlovsk on 6 September 1869 (=25 August, Russian calendar), during his eleventh Russian concert season. The audience demanded several encores of the piece.

    To add 'local colour' for his home audiences, the commercially-minded Johann -- possibly at the bidding of his Viennese publisher -- subsequently retitled the polka Im Krapfenwald'l, and it was under this name that Viennese audiences first heard the work when Eduard Strauss conducted it at a festival concert in the Volksgarten on 24 June 1870. The new title referred to the popular Krapfenwald area of the Vienna Woods, situated between the scenic village of Grinzing and the heights of Kobenzl and the Kahlenberg, where Franz Josef Krapf had earlier opened his 'Krapfenwaldel' tavern.

  • Johann Strauss II: Tales from the Vienna Woods - Walz

    15:18

    Performance: May 2008, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
    Orquestra Filarmônica de Minas Gerais
    Fabio Costa, conductor

  • Johann Strauss II - On the Beautiful Blue Danube, Opus 314

    5:37

    An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (English translation: On the Beautiful Blue Danube) is a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II (1825-1899), composed in 1866.Originally performed 15 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men's Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire.

  • “Circassian March”, Johann Strauss Jr.

    4:54

    “Circassian March, Op. 335” [“Tscherkessen-Marsch”], Johann Strauss II, 1869.

    Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Herbert von Karajan.

    This masterpiece was written by Strauss during his tour of Russia in the 1860s. “Circassian March” was premiered in St. Petersburg in 1869. On his return to Vienna, Strauss re-released the piece as “Egyptian March” [“Ägyptischer Marsch”], as it was adapted to the opening of the Suez Canal in November 1869.

    Johann Strauss II (1825-1899) was an Austrian composer of waltzes, polkas, marches, and operettas. Strauss was known as “Waltz King”. His most famous works include “The Blue Danube”, “Kaiser-Walzer” [“Emperor Waltz”], “Tales from the Vienna Woods”, and “Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka”. Strauss’ best known operettas include “Die Fledermaus” and “Der Zigeunerbaron”.

  • Johann Strauss II - Seid Umschlungen, Millionen - Walzer, Op. 443

    9:23

    Brahms must be honoured with a dedication, by a waltz of my composition. In due course I want to present him with this waltz, popular, yet spicy and peppered, without sacrificing the purpose of a waltz... He must, however, be told nothing about it! Thus wrote Johann Strauss on 25 November 1891, in a letter to the Berlin-based Fritz Simrock, publisher of his forthcoming full-scale opera, Ritter Pásmán [Première: Hofoperntheater, Vienna 1 January 1892].

    It had been Johannes Brahms (1833-97) who had prompted the contract between Strauss and Simrock, his own publisher, when he challenged the latter in April 1889 to arrange a tie-up with him. Simrock had accepted, and for the next three years acted as Johann's sole publisher (opp. 437-445). In the event, Ritter Pásmán proved an unequivocal failure Strauss was deeply upset, the more so since Brahms, who earlier had shown such an interest in the undertaking, had found serious fault with the compositional form of the opera. Through the dedication of a master waltz to Brahms, however, Johann felt that he could somewhat redress the balance with his friend. Long before the waltz was composed, Strauss had settled upon its title -- Seid umschlungen, Millionen -- and had even asked Simrock to ensure a very attractive title page bearing the words: Dedicated in friendship to Herr Dr Brahms. The title of the waltz was borrowed from Friedrich Schiller's Ode an die Freude (Ode to Joy) -- and had been suggested to Johann by his friend Julius Stettenheim, who had requested a waltz of that title for a journalists' ball to be held in Berlin in early 1892. Instead, Strauss chose to use the title for a waltz he had promised Princess Pauline Metternich-Sándor for her grand 'International Exhibition of Music and Theatre', scheduled to open on the Vienna Prater on 7 May 1892. However, when Johann learned that the new waltz would be performed by the Exhibition Orchestra, rather than under his own direction, he preferred to incur the Princess's wrath by conducting the première of Seid umschlungen, Millionen himself at the Strauss Orchestra's final concert that season, held in the magnificent surroundings of the Great Hall of the Musikverein on 27 March 1892 -- a full six weeks before the official opening of the Exhibition. Brahms, by this time aware he was dedicatee of the new work, was present at this first performance and the previous day showed his appreciation by addressing his visiting card to the Strauss home, with the message: Tomorrow, your most happy and proud listener! The waltz occasioned rapturous applause and Brahms notified Simrock: The third time the whole audience was playing along. Underlining his high regard for Brahms, Strauss took the unusual step of personally arranging the piano edition of Seid umschlungen, Millionen -- a task normally undertaken by employees of the music publisher -- and as such Simrock was able to put the waltz (inscribed merely: Dedicated to Johannes Brahms) on sale in April 1892. Surprisingly, in Vienna the composition was slow to attract the public's favour. Johann wrote to his brother Eduard: The Millionenwalzer does not bring the business which Simrock anticipated. Fourteen days ago he told me that he had sold only 6,000 copies. Certainly a very modest result. Of course, the waltz appeared only two and a half months ago. For his part, Eduard took the new work with him on his summer concert tour of Germany, and at the end of May could advise Johann: Your Millionenwalzer is causing a sensation everywhere; I am playing it in every concert. In the event, the 'Millionenwalzer' even found a place at the International Exhibition when Eduard and the Strauss Orchestra performed it there on 13 September 1892.

    Photo: Johann Strauss II and Johannes Brahms (1894).

  • Simon Fischer: Johann Strauss II Voices of Spring

    8:57

    Johann Strauss II: Voices of Spring
    Arranged by Simon Fischer

    Simon Fischer - violin
    Joseph Havlat - piano


  • Vienna New Years Concert 2010, Die Fledermaus Overture, Johann Strauss

    9:20

    From the New Years Day concert 2010 in Vienna. Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus Overture. Upscaled to 720p.

    Recorded from the BBC on 01 January 2010.

  • Perpetuum Mobile - A Musical Joke - Johann Strauss Jr.

    3:06

    Perpetuum Mobile - A Musical Joke

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Johann Strauss Jr. - Die Fledermaus Overture - OSRP - Reg. Claudio Cruz

    8:47

    Johann Strauss Jr. - Die Fledermaus Overture (Abertura de O Morcego),
    OSRP - Orquestra Sinfonica de Ribeirão Preto - SP,
    Reg. Claudio Cruz,
    Visite:
    Concerto em comemoração aos 150 anos de Ribeirão Preto, gravado no Theatro Pedro II em 2006.
    Ouça mais musicas com esta orquestra em:

    Die Fledermaus (O Morcego) é uma opereta cômica em três atos do compositor alemão Johann Strauss. Ela estreou em 5 de abril de 1874 no Theater an der Wien em Viena, Áustria - fonte:

    Johann Strauss Jr. - Die Fledermaus Overture,
    OSRP - Symphony Orchestra of Ribeirão Preto - SP,
    Reg Claudio Cruz,
    Visit:
    Concert in commemoration of 150 years of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo state, Brazil, recorded in Theatro Pedro II in 2006.
    Listen to more music with this orchestra in:

  • Pizzicato Polka, Johann Strauss

    2:24

    Pizzicato Polka de Johann Strauss interpretado por la Orquesta Internacional de Praga en el Auditorio de Zaragoza el 5 de enero de 2008.

  • Johann Strauss II: Rosen Aus Dem Süden, Op. 388 - Riccardo Caramella Ensemble

    9:04

    Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)
    also known as Johann Baptist Strauss or Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, or the Son

    Rosen Aus Dem Süden, Op. 388
    Transcription by Arnold Schönberg (1874 - 1951) for string quartet, harmonium & piano (1921)
    Introduktion (Andantino) - Allegro agitato - Walzer 1 - Walzer 2 - Walzer 3 - Walzer 4 - Coda


    Riccardo Caramella Ensemble

    Quartetto Voces:
    Bujor Prelipcean, violin
    Anton Diaconu, violin
    Ion Stanciu, viola
    Dan Prelipcean, cello

    Fabio Luz, harmonium
    Riccardo Caramella, piano

    live concert, Auditorium Rai, Torino, 1987

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