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Playlist of Johann Strauss, Jr

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  • The best of Johann Strauss II

    1:13:51

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    Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)


    1.Voices of Spring, Op. 410, 0:00
    2.Tritsch-Tratsch Polka, Op. 214 6:59
    3.Emperor Waltz, Op. 437 9:42
    4.Annen Polka, Op. 117 21:45
    5.Enjoy Your Life, Waltz, Op. 340 24:46
    6.Egyptian March, Op. 335 33:10
    7.Vienna Blood Waltz, Op. 354 37:18
    8.Thunder & Lightning, Op. 324 46:47
    9.Die Fledermaus Waltz, Op. 367 50:06
    10.Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 57:00
    11.Bandit's Gallop, Op. 276 1:00:09
    12.Blue Danube, Op. 314 1:02:57

  • Strauss II - Waltzes, Polkas & Operettas | Classical Music Collection

    2:47:19

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    STRAUSS II
    WALTZES, POLKAS & OPERETTAS

    01. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen), Waltz Op. 410 00:00
    02. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden), Waltz Op. 388 07:31
    03. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der schönen blauen Donau), Waltz Op. 314 17:11
    04. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz Op. 234 28:35
    05. Treasure Waltz (Schatz-Walzer), Op. 418 37:29
    06. Where the Lemon Trees Bloom (Wo die Citronen blüh'n), Waltz Op. 346 45:53
    07. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz Op. 443 55:36
    08. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons), Waltz Op. 307 01:05:32
    09. Artist's Life (Künstlerleben) Waltz Op. 316 01:14:56
    10. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz Op. 325 01:25:18
    11. Wine, Women and Song (Wein, Weib und Gesang) Waltz Op. 333 01:38:04
    12. Morning Journals (Morgenblätter), Op. 279 01:43:40
    13. Love Songs (Liebeslieder), Waltz Op. 114 01:54:48
    14. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz Op. 354 02:04:20
    15. Annen-Polka Op. 117 02:13.33
    16. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka Op. 319 02:16:36
    17. Tritsch-Tratsch Polka Op. 214 02:19:17
    18. Thunder & Lightning (Unter Donner und Blitz) Polka Op. 324 02:21:50
    19. Long live the Magyar (Éljen a Magyar! ), Polka Op. 332 02:24:53
    20. The Gypsy Baron: Ouverture 02:27:38
    21. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: March. Hurrah, die Schlacht 02:29:55
    22. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: Finale. Reich' ihm die Hand 02:32:44
    23. Persian March, Op. 289 02:33:47
    24. Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 02:36:04
    25. The Bat (Die Fledermaus): Ouverture 02:38:58

    Tracks 1-2, 10 & 25 performed by Vilnius Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 3, 20 & 22 performed by Donetsk Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 4-9, 11-19 & 23-24 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    Track 21 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Donetsk Chorus, Stefan Marzcik

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    #classicalmusic #strauss #waltz #polka #operetta

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  • Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz

    10:59

    Disscuss/Review The Blue Danube Waltz at

    Title : Johann Strauss II , The Blue Danube Waltz
    Date : 1867

    From Wikipedia,The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau op. 314 (On the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by Johann Strauss II, composed in 1867. Originally performed 9 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men's Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success, however, and Strauss is reputed to have said The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda -- I wish that had been a success!

    The waltz originally had an accompanying song text written by Josef Weyl. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World's Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion.

    The sentimental Viennese connotations of the piece have made it into a sort of unofficial Austrian national anthem. It is a traditional encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year's Concert. The first few bars are also the interval signal of Osterreich Rundfunk's overseas programs.

    It is reported by composer Norman Lloyd in his Golden Encyclopedia of Music that when asked by Frau Strauss for an autograph, the composer Johannes Brahms autographed Mrs. Strauss's fan by writing on it the first few bars of the Blue Danube. Under it he wrote Unfortunately not by Johannes Brahms.The work commences with an extended introduction in the key of A major with shimmering (tremolo) violins and a French horn spelling out the familiar waltz theme, answered by staccato wind chords, in a subdued mood. It rises briefly into a loud passage but quickly dies down into the same restful nature of the opening bars. A contrasting and quick phrase in D major anticipates the waltz before 3 quiet downward-moving bass notes usher in the first principal waltz melody.

    The first waltz theme is familiar gently rising triad motif in cellos and horns in the tonic D major, accompanied by harps; the Viennese waltz beat is accentuated at the end of each 3-note phrase. The Waltz 1A triumphantly ends its rounds of the motif, and waltz 1B follows in the same key; the genial mood is still apparent.

    Waltz 2A glides in quietly (still in D major) before a short contrasting middle section in B flat major. The entire section is repeated.

    A more dour waltz 3A is introduced in G major before a fleeting eighth-note melodic phrase (waltz 3B). An loud Intrada (introduction) is then played. Waltz 4A starts off in a romantic mood (F major) before a more joyous waltz 4B in the same key.

    After another short Intrada in A, cadencing in F-sharp minor, sonorous clarinets spell out the poignant melody of waltz 5A in A. Waltz 5B is the climax, punctuated by cymbal crashes. Each of these may be repeated at the discretion of the performer.

    The coda recalls earlier sections (3A and 2A) before furious chords usher in a recap of the romantic Waltz 4A. The idyll is cut short as the waltz hurries back to the famous waltz theme 1A again. This statement is cut short, however, by the final codetta: a variation of 1A is presented, connecting to a rushing eighth-note passage in the final few bars: repeated tonic chords underlined by a snare drumroll and a bright-sounding flourish.

  • Strauss Jr - STRAUSS THE BEST OF POLKAS

    2:1:06

    STRAUSS THE BEST OF POLKAS
    1. Auf der Jagd, Op. 373 00:00
    2. Pizzicato-Polka 2:08
    3. Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, Op. 214 4:44
    4. Die Schwatzerin, Op. 144 7:22
    5. Annen-Polka, Op. 117 11:04
    6. Jokey-Polka 15:03
    7. Feuerfest 17:11
    8. Eingesendet, Op. 240 20:07
    9. Demolirer-Polka, Op. 269 21:55
    10. Brennende Liebe, Op. 129 25:32
    11. Bahn frei!, Op. 45 29:49
    12. Aquarellen, Op. 258 32:14
    13. Sturmisch in Lieb' und Tanz, Op. 393 39:52
    14. Frauenherz, Op. 166 41:57
    15. Piefke und Pufke, Op. 235 46:00
    16. Im Krapfenwaldl, Op. 336 47:58
    17. Die Libelle, Op. 204 52:03
    18. Moulinet 56:27
    19. So angstlich sind wir nicht!, Op. 413 59:47
    20. Lob der Frauen, Op. 315 1:02:06
    21. Explosions-Polka, Op. 43 1:05:54
    22. Heiterer Mut, Op. 281 1:08:03
    23. Champagner-Polka, Op. 211 1:11:11
    24. Neue Pizzicato-Polka, Op. 449 1:13:17
    25. Eljien a Magyar!, Op. 332 1:16:51
    26. Unter Donner und Blitz, Op. 324 1:19:28
    27. Auf Ferienreisen, Op. 133 1:22:34
    28. Vergnugungszug, Op. 281 1:25:06
    29. Leichtes Blut, Op. 319 1:27:56
    30. Die Emancipirte, Op. 282 1:30:26
    31. Accelerationen, Op. 234 1:33:51
    32. Bitte schon!, Op. 372 1:41:37
    33. Tik-Tak-Polka, Op. 365 1:45:41
    34. Ohne Sorgen, Op. 271 1:48:26
    35. Im Fluge, Op. 230 1:50:06
    36. Extempore, Op. 241 1:51:55
    37. Freikugeln, Op. 326 1:55:08
    38. Rudolfsheimer-Polka, Op. 152 1:57:58

    Find all time classic Tracks.
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  • Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    8:31

    Discuss/review/recommend the work at

    Title : Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    From Wikipedia,
    Die Fledermaus (in English: The Bat;' in French: La Chauve-souris') is an operetta composed by Johann Strauss II to a German libretto by Carl Haffner and Richard Genée.

    The original source for Die Fledermaus is a farce by German playwright Julius Roderich Benedix (1811--1873), Das Gefängnis (The Prison). Another source is a French vaudeville play, Le réveillon, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. This was first translated by Carl Haffner into a non-musical play to be produced in Vienna. However, the peculiarly French custom of the réveillon (a midnight supper party) caused problems, which were solved by the decision to adapt the play as a libretto for Johann Strauss, with the réveillon replaced by a Viennese ball. At this point Haffner's translation was handed over for adaptation to Richard Genée, who subsequently claimed not only that he had made a fresh translation from scratch but that he had never even met Haffner.

    The operetta premièred on April 5, 1874 at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna, Austria and has been part of the regular operetta repertoire ever since. It currently appears as number 19 on Opera America's list of the 20 most-performed operatic works in North America.

  • Johann STRAUSS - The Greatest Hits

    1:14:06

    Johann Strauss - The Greatest Hits (Full album) 2014 / FULL HD
    State Symphony Orchestra of the USSR Ministry of Culture & Pavel Kogan

    01. Sounds of Spring Waltz, Op. 410
    02. Viennese Waltz, Op. 307
    03. Backgammon Polka, Op. 214
    04. Radetzky March, Op. 228
    05. Blue Danube, Op. 314
    06. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 449
    07. The Gypsy Baron Quadrille, Op. 422
    08. Polka-Mazurka, Fata Morgana, Op. 330
    09. In Krapfenvale, Op. 336
    10. A woman's heart, Op. 166
    11. Feast of Fire, Polka, Op. 269
    12. Artist's Life, Op. 316
    13. Hunting Polka, Op. 373
    14. You are my treasure, Op. 418
    15. Polka thunder and lightning, Op. 324
    16. Vienna, woman and song, Op. 333

  • x
  • Strauss II - Greatest Waltzes Collection

    2:25:57

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    STRAUSS II
    Greatest Waltzes Collection

    01 Schatz-Walzer (Treasure Waltz) Op. 418 00:00
    02 Rosen aus dem Süden (Roses from the South) Op. 388 08:25
    03 Frühlingsstimmen (Voices of Spring), Op. 410 18:07
    04 Wein, Weib und Gesang (Wine, Women and Song) Op. 333 25:40
    05 An der Schonen Blauen Donau (On the Beautiful Blue Danube) Op. 314 31:18
    06 Kaiser Walzer (Emperor Waltz), Op. 437 42:42
    07 Wiener Bonbons (Vienna Sweets) Waltz Op. 307 54:36
    08 Wo die Citronen Blüh'n! (Where the Lemon Trees Bloom), Op. 364 1:04:02
    09 Seid umschlungen, Millionen! (Be Embraced, You Millions!) Waltz Op. 443 1:13:48
    10 Accellerationen (Accelerations) Waltz, Op. 234 1:23:49
    11 Künstlerleben (Artist’s Life) Op. 316 1:32:44
    12 Morgenblätter (Morning Journals), Op. 279 1:43:10
    13 Wiener Blut (Viennese Blood) Op. 354 1:54:20
    14 Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald (Tales from the Vienna Woods) Op. 325 2:03:36
    15 Liebeslieder (Love Songs) Op. 114 2:16:24

    1, 4, 8-13: performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    2, 3, 6 & 14: performed by Vilnius Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    5 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    15 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    #classicalmusic #classical #straussii

  • The Best of Strauss

    2:43

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    THE BEST OF STRAUSS II

    01. Emperor Waltz (Kaiser-Walzer) Op. 437 00:00
    02. Strauss I - Radetzky March Op. 228 11:57
    03. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen) Waltz, Op. 410 14:54
    04. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der Schönen Blauen Donau) Waltz, Op. 314 21:49
    05. Chit-Chat (Tritsch-Tratsch) Polka, Op. 214 32:42
    06. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 35:21
    07. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons) Waltz, Op. 307 44:10
    08. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz, Op. 325 53:46
    09. Love Songs (Liebeslieder) Waltz, Op. 114 1:06:20
    10. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden) Waltz, Op. 388 1:15:10
    11. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz, Op. 443 1:24:26
    12. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz, Op. 234 1:33:56
    13. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 1:42:55
    14. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka, Op. 139 1:52:21
    15. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 234 1:55:06
    16. Polka Schnell, Op. 281 1:57:49

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    The very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Ravel, Dvorák…

    #classicalmusic #classical #waltz #strauss

  • Voices Of Spring Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr.

    5:56

    Voices Of Spring Waltz

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

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  • Johann Strauss Jr - Wine, Women and Song

    6:26

    Johann Strauss Jr

    Wine Women and Song

  • Johann Strauss II - Voices of Spring Waltz

    5:33

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

    In its purely orchestral version the Frühlingsstimmen Walzer was played for the first time on 18 March 1883 when the composer's brother, Eduard Strauss, conducted it with the Strauss Orchestra at one of his regular Sunday afternoon concerts in the Goldene Saal (Golden Hall) of the Musikverein building in Vienna. This première also met with great success and the waltz had to be encored.

  • Johann Strauss II. - Der Zigeunerbaron

    8:13

    The Gypsy Baron, Overture


    ________________________________

    #7 im Programm des Neujahrskonzerts 2009 in Wien
    #7 of New Year's Concert 2009 in Vienna
    #7 ニューイヤーコンサート 2009

  • Johann Strauss • Overture to The Gipsy Baron - Der Zigeunerbaron • Volker Hartung, conductor

    8:47

    * More informations at
    * You can listen to the album of this performance in excellent 24bit-sound on many digital platforms as:


    Johann Strauss' famous overture in a public concert performance by the Cologne New Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Maestro Volker Hartung.
    Live from Hamburg's Laeisz-Concert Hall, Germany in March 2012.

    Johann Strauss's berühmte Ouvertüre zu 'Der Zigeunerbaron' in einer Konzertaufführung mit Junge Philharmonie Köln unter der Leitung von Volker Hartung.
    Live aus der Hamburger Laeisz-Halle im März 2012.
    Viel Spaß!

    Enjoy!

  • Vienna New Years Concert 2010, Die Fledermaus Overture, Johann Strauss

    9:20

    From the New Years Day concert 2010 in Vienna. Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus Overture. Upscaled to 720p.

    Recorded from the BBC on 01 January 2010.

  • The Blue Danube Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr

    9:56

    The Blue Danube Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr

  • My Top 10 Favorite Johann Strauss 1,2 Waltzes

    1:29:52

    Download this waltzes here :
    1.Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen) Waltz, Op. 410. 0:00
    2.Emperor Waltz (Kaiser-Walzer) Op. 437 5:29
    3.On the Beautiful Blue Danube Waltz, Op. 314 17:02
    4. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz, Op. 234 27:54
    5.Roses from the South Waltz, Op. 388 36:22
    6.Be Embraced, You Millions Waltz, Op. 443 45:14
    7.Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz, Op. 325 54:35
    8.Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 1:05
    9. Love Songs (Liebeslieder) Waltz, Op. 114 1:12
    10.Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons) Waltz, Op. 307 1:20
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  • Johann Strauss II - Roses from the South Waltz

    8:50

    It was an eventful evening; the house was filled to the gables in order to hear a new work by our Strauss

    So wrote the Fremdenblatt newspaper (3 October) in its review of the highly successful première of Johann Strauss's operetta Das Spitzentuch der Königin ('The Queen's Lace Handkerchief'), which opened at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on 1 October 1880. The composer himself, though delighted by the reception accorded his latest stage work, was unconvinced that it would enjoy a lasting success. But he had no such doubts about the magnificent orchestral waltz, Rosen aus dem Süden, which he had hurriedly assembled from themes in his operetta, and whose piano edition his publisher, Cranz, was able to advertise in the press (together with the first Spitzentuch potpourri) just four days after the theatrical première! The honour of conducting the first performance of Rosen aus dem Süden fell to Johann's brother, Eduard, who was still on a concert tour of Germany when Spitzentuch received its première. Not until 7 November, therefore, at Eduard's Sunday afternoon concert in the Musikverein, did the waltz begin its triumphant conquest of the world, comprising, as it did, many of the musical highlights from the operetta. Two numbers which had drawn especial praise from the Spitzentuch first-night reviewers were the King's Act 1 Trüffel-Couplet (Stets kommt mir wieder in den Sinn -- the refrain of which Strauss claimed he had rewritten twelve times!) and Cervantes's Act 2 Romance, Wo die wilde Rose erblüht, and these both appear in Rosen aus dem Süden, as Waltz 1 and Waltz 2A respectively.

  • Johann Strauss II - Kaiser-Walzer, Op. 437

    11:35

    In the autumn of 1889 Johann Strauss conducted five concerts in Berlin at the newly-opened Königsbau concert hall. Prior to the composer's departure for Germany the Viennese press reported that he had sent his Berlin publisher a new waltz, entitled Hand in Hand. This title referred to a toast made in August 1889 by the Austrian Emperor, Franz Joseph I, on the occasion of his visit to the German Kaiser, Wilhelm II, in which Austria had extended 'the hand of friendship' to Germany. The astute publisher, Fritz Simrock, suggested to Johann that Kaiser-Walzer might prove a more suitable title since, by not dedicating the work to either monarch, title that the Waltz King's magnificent composition was first performed in Berlin on 21 October 1889—though it should be noted that the illustrated title page of the original piano edition is emblazoned with the Austrian Imperial crown!

    Picture: The German Emperor Wilhelm II (left) and the Emperor Franz Joseph of Austria-Hungary (right).

    Conductor: Georges Prêtre
    Orchestra: Wiener Philharmoniker

  • Johann Strauss II - Morning Papers

    10:20

  • The Beautiful Blue Danube - André Rieu

    8:14

    André Rieu & his Johann Strauss Orchestra playing The Beautiful Blue Danube (An der schönen blauen Donau) by composer Johann Strauss II. Recorded live at Empress Sisi's castle; Schönbrunn Palace Vienna, Austria with dancers from the famous Austrian Elmayer Dancing School.

    Clip from the DVD André Rieu At Schönbrunn, Vienna.
    One of André's biggest and most beautiful special ever.

    Tracklist:
    01. Einzugsmarsch
    02. Trumpet Voluntary
    03. Auf der Jagd
    04. Fächerpolonaise
    05. Rosen aus dem Süden
    06. Heia in den Bergen
    07. G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald
    08. Der dritte Mann
    09. Freunde, das Leben ist lebenswert
    10. Die Mädis vom Chantant
    11. Die Czárdásfürstin Potpourri
    12. Ohne Sorgen
    13. Feuerfest
    14. My Heart Will Go On
    15. Wenn ich mit meinem Dackel
    16. Heut' kommen d'Engerln auf Urlaub nach Wien
    17. Spiel mir das Lied von Glück und Treu
    18. Kaiserwalzer
    19. Ich gehör nur mir
    20. An der schönen blauen Donau
    21. Radetzky Marsch
    22. Als flotter Geist
    23. Wien du Stadt meiner Träume
    24. Musik, Musik!
    25. Anton aus Tirol
    26. Donauwalzer
    27. Strauss Party
    28. Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier

    For tour dates visit:



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  • Johann Strauss II - Tales from the Vienna Woods Waltz

    11:01

    The decorative first piano edition of Johann Strauss's evocative waltz Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald carries the composer's respectful dedication to his Highness Prince Constantin Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (1828-1896), and the work was almost certainly given its world première at a private soirée in the prince's 16th-century palace in the Augarten, Vienna, during summer 1868. An undated letter from that year, written to the composer by Princess Marie Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, reads: Dear Sir, The performance of your beautiful waltz gave me such pleasure recently -- that I cannot help asking you kindly to accept a small memento of the unforgettable evening. It is to remind you of another of your finely-chiselled masterpieces, by the blue Danube -- whose sound reminds us all of happy hours. With repeated thanks and greatest respect. Fürstin zu Hohenlohe. (The nature of the Princess's memento is unfortunately not known). Since May 1867 Prince Constantin had held the position of First Master of the Royal Household and had lived in the Augarten residence with his wife Marie (née Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein), the daughter of Franz Liszt's long-term mistress Princess Carolyne Wittgenstein. Through Marie's connections the Augarten Palace, situated on the opposite side of the Danube Canal from the inner city of Vienna, became a focal point of cultural life in the Austrian capital. (After the Second World War it became, and has remained, the home of the Vienna Boys' Choir).

    On 22 June 1868 Johann Strauss conducted a public performance of Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald before an audience of five thousand at the 'Sommerliedertafel' (Summer Song Programme) of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) held in Karl Schwender's 'Neue Welt' entertainment establishment in the Vienna suburb of Hietzing. Yet this was no public première: three days earlier in the Volksgarten, at an 'Extraordinary Novelty Festival with Fireworks, for the Benefit of Josef and Eduard Strauss' on 19 June, Johann himself conducted the new work to great applause and was obliged to repeat it four times. A particularly strong impression was made by the waltz's expansive Introduction of 122 bars, a rustic tone-poem evocative of the countryside of the Wienerwald, the wooded eastern foothills of the Alps, situated just north-west of Vienna. It is curious to reflect, therefore, that at no time in his life did the composer himself undertake walks in the Vienna Woods -- indeed, he expressed a lifelong fear of climbing even the most gentle of hills! Through the use of zither (replaced on this recording by an optional string ensemble) and Ländler-style rhythms in the Introduction and Coda, Strauss emphasises the close ties between the Viennese Waltz and the peasant music of Lower Austria. A zither-player pictured in a vignette on the cover of the first piano edition further underlines this connection, while the artist also depicts other commonplace scenes and pleasures to be enjoyed in the countryside -- shooting on a rifle range, a pair of lovers enjoying rural seclusion, and young men bowling at an outdoor skittle alley.

  • Johann Strauss II - Pizzicato Polka

    2:48

    The second of the Strauss brothers, Josef (1827-70), had been the first to tread the path of matrimony. Though very happily married since 1857, Josef constantly strove to become financially independent so he could break free from the oppressive confines of the Strauss family apartments in the massive 'Hirschenhaus' in Leopoldstadt and establish a home of his own with his wife and daughter. This possibility appeared to him to advance a step closer when, in 1868, brother Johann reached agreement with the management of the St Petersburg Tsarskoye-Selo Railway Company for Josef and himself to share the conducting of concerts at Pavlovsk during the summer months of 1869.

    The two Strauss brothers were accompanied on their 1869 venture to Russia by Johann's wife, Jetty (1818-78), whose letters home show that the underlying disharmony which had long existed between 'Jean' (Johann) and 'Pepi' (Josef) had largely given way to a spirit of mutual co-operation. As the two musical directors were now able to divide the workload of rehearsing and conducting the orchestra, both had sufficient time to compose. On 13 June 1869 (= 1 June, Russian calendar), Jetty wrote from Pavlovsk to Josef¡¦s wife Caroline (1831-1900) in Vienna: Pepi & Jean are now writing a polka together - that again will be something new. Almost twenty-three years later, on 1 April 1892, Johann detailed in a letter to his publisher Fritz Simrock the events which had culminated in this fraternal collaboration: I advised my brother Josef - so that he could secure the St Petersburg engagement (I have been there 10 times and earned a lot of money) [-] to compose something which would catch on in St Petersburg, and suggested he should prepare a pizzicato polka. He did not want to do it - he was always indecisive - finally I proposed to him that the polka should be created by the two of us. He agreed, and just look - the polka caused a furore in the true sense of the word.

    Johann Strauss was not exaggerating. The records kept by the diarist F.A. Zimmermann, a viola-player in the 47-strong orchestra at Pavlovsk, show clearly that the work was played no less than nine times on the evening it was first introduced to the Russian public - 24 June 1869 (= 12 June). One can only guess at the scenes which must have ensued as the public demonstrated its wild enthusiasm for this novelty item which, according to Johann, was the very first of its kind. (Léo Delibes's famous Pizzicato-Polka for his ballet Sylvia, ou La Nymphe de Diane was not heard until 1876.) In view of the work's success, it is strange that Johann and Josef omitted the Pizzicato-Polka from their next eleven concerts and only reintroduced it at their benefit performance on 6 July 1869 (= 24 June), when the piece had to be played a total of seven times. At subsequent performances during the remainder of the Pavlovsk season, the Pizzicato-Polka continued to exert its extraordinary effect upon the public.

    Outside the lands of the Tsar, the Pizzicato-Polka began its conquest of the world when Josef Strauss conducted its Viennese première on 14 November 1869 during the first of his promenade concerts that season with the Strauss Orchestra at the Sofienbad-Saal. In addition to the Pizzicato-Polka - which was given by a quartet of players - Josef also introduced the first Viennese performances of three other works written by him for that year's Pavlovsk concerts: Ohne Sorgen! Polka schnell op. 271, Frohes Leben, Walzer op. 272 and En passant, Polka française op. 273.

  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen Waltz, Op. 410 Voices of Spring

    8:37

    Zygmunt Nitkiewicz - conductor
    Symphony Orchestra of The Józef Marcin Żebrowski Music School in Częstochowa, Poland
    La Folle Journée de Varsovie
    recorded at Polish National Opera House in Warsaw, september 27, 2016

  • Johann Strauss - Overture Die Fledermaus

    8:58

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Overture Die Fledermaus

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Johann Strauss II - Vienna Blood Waltz

    7:07

    On 20 April 1873, the Archduchess Gisela Louise Maria (1856-1932), eldest daughter of the Austrian Emperor Franz Josef and the Empress Elisabeth, married Prince Leopold of Bavaria (1846-1930) in Vienna. To commemorate this major occasion a series of glittering festivities was arranged around the date of the Imperial wedding, including a Court Ball in the Hofburg Palace and a festival in the Prater, and the most important organisations of the nobility and citizenry, as well as the authorities of the City of Vienna itself, vied with each other in the organising of numerous celebrations and festive events.

    For their part, the personnel of the Wiener Hof-Operntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre) devised a very special attraction and announced for 22 April 1873 a Court Opera Ball - a forerunner of the present-day Vienna Opera Ball - the proceeds from which were destined for the theatre's Pensions Institute, which arranged the event. However, since at this time the Austrian Emperor was unprepared to sanction dancing in the Hof-Operntheater, which he looked upon as 'his' opera house, the event was instead held in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein building - home of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Society of the Friends of Music) and today the setting for the annual New Year's Day Concerts of the Vienna Philharmonic. As hosts of the Court Opera Ball, the artistes of the Hof-Operntheater were keen to present themselves as favourably as possible to their public, and so offered their guests a particularly beguiling programme. They engaged the Strauss Orchestra and its conductor, 'Court Ball Music Director' Eduard Strauss, to provide the music for dancing, but withheld their pièce de résistance until around midnight, when a break in proceedings of one hour¡¦s duration was announced for the benefit of both orchestra and dancers.

    Now the highlight of the evening was revealed as the resident orchestra of the Vienna Court Opera, the Vienna Philharmonic, presented a short concert of music. Since the Director of the Wiener Philharmoniker, Johann Herbeck, had been taken ill shortly before the ball, the first item - Carl Maria von Weber's Aufforderung zum Tanz (Invitation to the Dance), in Hector Berlioz's orchestration - was conducted by Otto Dessoff, who at that time was also leader of the Philharmonic Concerts. The critic of the Fremden-Blatt (24.04.1873) observed of this performance that it was played with such verve and precision that perhaps nobody will be able to recall having heard this piece of music better [played]. The journalist continued: After this, Johann Strauss stepped up to the conductor's podium to perform his latest waltz, 'Wiener Blut'. We do not believe that we are overstating our praise if we count this work amongst the best by the beloved Waltz King. This dance piece is a collection of genuine Viennese tunes, full of melody and electrifying rhythm. On tempestuous demand the waltz had to be repeated. The reviewer for the Neues Wiener Tagblatt (23.04.1873) was equally enthusiastic, numbering the waltz Wiener Blut amongst the most beautiful which Strauss has written in recent years. In these three-four bars, sometimes cheeky, sometimes sentimental, flows fresh, free and red Viennese blood.

    This performance of the waltz Wiener Blut, on the night of 22/23 April 1873, marked the first occasion on which the Viennese Waltz King conducted the renowned Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and thus also the commencement of the orchestra's 'Strauss tradition'. (Some six months later, on 4 November 1873, the Wiener Philharmoniker would cement this relationship still further when, under the composer's direction, they performed Strauss's waltz An der schönen blauen Donau for the very first time at a concert in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein, hosted by the Committee of the Chinese World Exhibition.)

  • Johann Strauss II - Éljen a Magyar! - Polka-schnell, Op. 332

    2:29

    Immediately after the close of the official 1869 Vienna Carnival calendar, Johann and Josef Strauss began preparations for their joint Russian summer season of concerts in Pavlovsk from 9 May (= 27 April, Russian calendar) until 10 October (= 28 September). But a number of concert engagements had to be fulfilled before their departure, including a journey by the Strauss orchestra under the direction of all three brothers, Johann, Josef and Eduard, to the Hungarian town of Pest on the banks of the Danube. To coincide with the opening of Pest's imposing new Redoutensaal building, the brothers had organised two concerts there on 16 and 17 March. It was at the first of these that Johann conducted his quick polka Éljen a Magyar!, composed especially for the occasion and dedicated to the Hungarian Nation. From his early days as a composer Johann was as much at home with the music of Hungary as he was with that of his native Vienna, and this exciting work, further enhanced at its première by the participation of the Budapest Men's Choral Association, was triumphantly applauded and had to be repeated several times. The Coda of the work features a fleeting quotation from the Rákóczi March, which Berlioz had earlier utilised in his Damnation of Faust (1846), but which owes its origins to the patriotic Magyar Rákóczi song.

  • Johann Strauss Jr.-Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka - New Years Concert 2012

    3:21

    Mariss Jansons, conductor
    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

  • Johann Strauss II - An der schönen, blauen Donau - Walzer, Op. 314

    9:40

    It is interesting to reflect that Johann Strauss II's An der schönen blauen Donau (By the beautiful blue Danube), the most famous of all orchestral waltzes, was conceived and first performed as a showpiece for male voice choir. The work was Johann's first choral waltz, written as a commission for the Wiener Mannergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) with whom he was to enjoy a close association over the years, creating for the choir a total of six choral master waltzes, two polkas and a march.

    Strauss began sketching themes for the waltz, which would eventually bear the title An der schönen blauen Donau, in autumn 1866, and originally submitted to the Association a four-part unaccompanied chorus comprising just four waltz sections and a brief Coda, but without Introduction. A hastily written piano accompaniment followed soon afterwards, and then a fifth waltz section. The orchestral accompaniment, together with the distinctive Introduction, was provided only shortly before the first performance which took place at Vienna's Dianabad-Saal ballroom during the Association's Faschings-Liedertafel (Carnival Programme of Songs) on 15 February 1867. In the absence of the composer, who was appearing with the Strauss Orchestra at the Imperial Court on the night of the première, the members of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein were conducted by their chorus-master, Rudolf Weinwurm, and accompanied by the orchestra of the 'Georg V, König von Hannover' Infantry Regiment No. 42, which was temporarily stationed in Vienna. The original, satirical, text had been furnished by the Association's own 'house poet', Josef Weyl (1821-95), although a new text was added in 1890 by Franz von Gernerth (1821-1900) which was more suited to non-carnival occasions and commenced with the now familiar words: Donau so blau ... (Danube so blue...)

    The Viennese were treated to the first purely orchestral rendition of An der schönen blauen Donau - complete with Introduction and full-length Coda - on Sunday 10 March 1867 in the Volksgarten at the Strauss Orchestra's annual Carnival Revue, which took the form a Benefit Concert by Josef and Eduard Strauss, with the participation of Johann Strauss, Imperial-Royal Court Ball Music Director. This date is further confirmed by an entry in Josef Strauss's diary. Johann himself conducted this performance of his waltz, which featured as the third item on a programme presenting no less than twenty-four novelties composed for that year's carnival celebrations by the three Strauss brothers. Perhaps surprisingly, in view of the unanimous praise lavished by the Viennese press upon the choral première of the work, the orchestral version of An der schönen blauen Donau did not attract special attention from the critics, the Neues Fremden-Blatt (11.03.1867) merely noting that every piece met with the most undivided applause, which now and then increased to tempestuous enthusiasm, and everything had to be repeated. The three brothers celebrated in this concert the greatest triumph in the sphere of Viennese dance music.

    During the 1867 Carnival, An der schönen blauen Donau was merely regarded as a pearl amongst many others, and only a little later did the unique position which it was to assume, and maintain, as the unofficial national anthem of both Vienna and Austria, become evident. The new waltz was in the composer's luggage which he took with him to Paris in summer 1867, where it was played on 28 May at the glittering Austrian Embassy Ball given by the Ambassador, Prince Richard Metternich, and his wife, Princess Pauline, benefiting considerably from an attendance by the élite of international society. An Englishwoman who was present at this event, Mrs Charles Moulton (later Madame de Hegermann-Lindencrone), wrote home enthusiastically the following day: The famous Johann Strauss, brought from Vienna especially for this occasion, stood waiting with uplifted baton and struck up the 'Blue Danube', heard for the first time in Paris... And how Strauss played it!... With what fire and 'entrain'!. It did not take long for the reputation of the work to spread much further afield, and on 1 July 1867 Theodore Thomas conducted its first American performance in New York with his own orchestra, an ensemble which later became the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. A little less than twelve weeks later, on 21 September 1867, the composer conducted the British première of the work (in a choral version with a 100-strong male voice choir) at London's Royal Italian Opera House, Covent Garden, afterwards noting in his diary: tremendous tumult and rejoicing!!!.

    Conductor: Franz Welser-Most
    Orchestra: London Philarmonic Orchestra

  • Johann Strauss II - An der schönen blauen Donau Waltz, Op. 314 The Blue Danube

    11:38

    Zygmunt Nitkiewicz - conductor
    Symphony Orchestra of The Józef Marcin Żebrowski Music School in Częstochowa, Poland
    La Folle Journée de Varsovie
    recorded at Polish National Opera House in Warsaw, september 27, 2016

  • Johann Strauss II - Ich bin dir gut! - Walzer, Op. 455

    10:13

    On 15 October 1844, the 18-year-old Johann Strauss the Younger appeared in public for the first time as composer and conductor at the head of his orchestra for a much-heralded soirée at Dommayer's Casino in the Viennese suburb of Hietzing. Half a century after this tentative first step upon his musical career, Johann stood before the Viennese as the world's most celebrated composer of dance music and operetta. If he had anticipated that his Golden Jubilee in October 1894 would have been allowed to pass comparatively quietly, he was mistaken, for his native city was munificent in lavishing upon her favourite son several days of receptions, festive concerts and performances on a scale previously unwitnessed in the Austrian capital. Messages of goodwill flooded in from celebrities around the world, honours were heaped upon the celebrant and, in the words of the composer's friend, the great Johannes Brahms: The week belonged to Strauss! It was really frantic, but happy and splendid and agreeable.

    In May 1893 Johann had commenced work on a new operetta, the Slavonic subject of which he had chosen himself. His friend Max Kalbeck (1850-1921) had written the libretto of the stage work, Joschko, with Gustav Davis (1856-1951), and it was hoped that the musical score would be completed before the end of the year. In the event, Strauss was delayed by intermittent illness and the new work, re-named Jabuka (Das Apfelfest) - Jabuka (The Apple Festival) - eventually took to the stage of the Theater an der Wien on 12 October 1894 as an hors d'oeuvre before the banquet of Golden Jubilee festivities that were to follow. Jabuka triumphed at its opening night, although it was felt, with some justification, that the material itself - a folk-tale set in contemporary Serbian south-Hungary - did not permit the composer to make full use of his idiosyncratic musical abilities. Strauss himself recognised the consequences these restrictions had exercised upon his creative powers and, in contrast to his usual procedure, personally undertook the orchestration of only one dance piece from the score of the operetta: the Jabuka-Walzer, which he dedicated to Julie Kalbeck, wife of the Jabuka librettist and Brahms biographer, Max Kalbeck. The waltz was given its first public performance by the Strauss Orchestra, under Eduard Strauss's direction, on 14 October 1894 at a Festival Concert honouring Johann Strauss in the Golden Hall of the Vienna Musikverein. Johann watched the concert with his family from a loggia and, when he rose to leave, the house erupted into a jubilant cheer: Auf frohes Wiedersehen! (Till our next happy meeting!).

    A few days later Johann wrote to his brother Eduard. The letter commences appreciatively (Your orchestra played quite superbly last Sunday), before Strauss, the consummate orchestrator, sounds a critical note: Everything was executed very well, with the exception of the first part of [Waltz] No. 1 [of the Jabuka-Walzer]. Play this piece strictly in waltz tempo without ritardando, with the exception of the introductory bar, but then only a little slower, so that the public can better distinguish the Introduction from the beginning of the first waltz [section]. For the percussion, (side drum) trumpets, even in the woodwind, a strictly rhythmic waltz rhythm exists, which cannot take a slower tempo. There then follows a most interesting passage: At the very end, treat the first part of [Waltz] No. 1 more as a dance waltz, all the more as the melody is broad - and therefore requires rhythmic assistance - which exists only in the accompaniment. If this also gets slower - then the effect is diminished. A comparison between Johann's instruction regarding the interpretation of Waltz 1A at the very end of the composition and the first piano edition of the Jabuka-Walzer reveals that, unusually, Strauss does not in fact repeat the striking first waltz theme (Ich bin dir gut!) in the Coda of his waltz as published. Moreover, shortly after Lewy had published the solo piano version of the Jabuka-Walzer, Strauss effected alterations to the construction of his waltz which resulted in the work being swiftly reissued (in editions for piano and full orchestra) - but still omitting the reprise of Waltz 1A in the Coda.

  • Frühlingsstimmen op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    5:48

    Frühlingsstimmen, walzer op. 410 (Voices of Spring). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).

  • Johann Strauss II - Sinngedichte - Walzer, Op. 1

    9:44

    One can scarcely imagine today the excitement and intrigue which must have greeted the first press reports in the Austrian capital that Johann Strauss junior, the unknown son of Europe's most celebrated dance music composer and conductor, was to make his public musical début with his own orchestra on 15 October 1844 at a Soirée dansante, and moreover that the event was to be held at one of his father's regular venues -- Dommayer's Casino. After obtaining permission from the Vienna municipal council on 5 September 1844 to his request to perform with an orchestra of twelve to fifteen players in restaurants and, indeed, at Dommayer's in Hietzing, who has already assured me that I can hold musical entertainments there as soon as my orchestra is in order, the 18-year-old youngster assembled his instrumentalists from the work-hungry players who thronged Vienna's 'musicians' exchange', the tavern 'Zur Stadt Belgrad' in the suburb of Josefstadt. The first announcement of the younger Johann's intentions had appeared in the Wiener Allgemeine Theaterzeitung on 2 October 1844 under the heading: Quick, what's new in Vienna? A new Capellmeister Strauss -- the term 'Capellmeister' referring to a conductor in charge of his own orchestra. The paper ended its report: One will be able to hear five [sic!] new compositions by him: we expect very much of this young man, and the public will certainly bestow upon the son just as much favour as it has for years granted his father. The sentiment of good luck! was echoed in many journals, although the elder Johann's reaction to this blatant act of filial defiance can merely be surmised -- he had forbidden his sons to pursue a musical career and intended that his eldest should join a bank. Unlike his wife, he did not attend Johann's début at Dommayer's, and if the son's actions took him by surprise, he must surely have been left wondering if some divine intervention had guided his choice, just a month earlier, of the title for his latest waltz: Geheimnisse aus der Wiener Tanzwelt (Secrets from the Viennese Dance World) op. 176.

    With actual dancing ruled out by the sheer numbers of people clamouring for admission to Dommayer's elegant, if small (it accommodated around 600 persons), premises for the younger Johann's début on 15 October, the Soirée dansante in reality took the form of a straight orchestral concert. While naturally there was interest in the youngster's interpretations of works by his father, Auber, Suppé, and Meyerbeer, it was his own compositions which the audience wanted most to hear. They were not disappointed, and each of the four works written especially for the occasion excited genuinely enthusiastic and tumultuous applause. Johann's publisher, Pietro Mechetti, subsequently allotted opus numbers to the four pieces in reverse order to that in which the works were introduced at the début: Gunst-Werber Walzer op. 4, Herzenslust Polka op. 3, Debut-Quadrille op. 2 and Sinngedichte Walzer op. 1.

  • Johann Strauss Jr.s Overtures - Blindekuh

    9:37

    Johann Strauss II - Blind Man's Buff (1878).

    On 15 June 1876 - even before the premiére of Johann Strauss's operetta Prinz Methusalem (Carl-Theater, 3 January 1877) - the Viennese Fremden-Blatt newspaper informed its readers that the following season's repertoire (i.e. autumn 1876 to summer 1877) at the Theater an der Wien would include a new operetta by the Waltz King entitled Blinde Kuh. The report correctly stated that the stage work was based on a comedy by the German actor, dramatist and theatre director Rudolf Kneisel (1831-99), with song texts by the ever-reliable Richard Genée (1823-95), but was incorrect in announcing that it was scheduled for early December 1876. As Jetty Strauss, Johann's first wife, was to write on 6 September 1876 to Victor Wilder (1835-92), the French co-librettist of Prinz Methusalem (Prince Methuselah): Jean [Johann] won't any longer permit 'Blinde Kuh' to be performed during this season [i.e. autumn 1876 to summer 1877]; on the contrary he has the plan (the idea) to give it first in Paris, since the piece is amusing and he has written enchanting music [for it].

    Johann's plan, as detailed by Jetty, failed to transpire. Instead, the composer remained extremely busy working towards the premières of Prinz Methusalem and La Tzigane (the French adaptation of Die Fledermaus, mounted in Paris on 30 October 1877). Then, after Jetty's sudden death on 8 April 1878, Johann set aside work on Blindekuh for a while, and only completed it with a new woman at his side - his second wife, Angelika (née Dittrich). Not until 17 November 1878 could the Fremden-Blatt report that Strauss's 'Blinde Kuh' is finished and in the possession of the management, and the new work finally reached the stage of the Theater an der Wien on 18 December 1878 - two years after its anticipated première. After a performance lasting three hours, and in spite of some applause for the music, one thing was certain: the public had witnessed a failure. As the journal Hans Jörgel (1872, Volume 52) opined: Individual charming blooms of melody floated in the slough of banality and popular song, a superfluity of reminiscences. As a true-hearted friend one must say, the opera was a roaring - failure. Theatre director Maximilian Steiner (1830-80) had apparently acquired Kneisel's comedy without the author's knowledge, and when the operetta proved beyond salvaging even by extensive reworking Strauss abandoned it with relative equanimity.

    Rather unusually for a Strauss overture, that for Blindekuh was heard in advance of the operetta's first stage performance. As is clear from an announcement which firs t appeared in Vienna's Morgen-Post newspaper on 4 December 1878, the composer made his Blindekuh Overture available for an academy of the Vienna Authors' and Journalists' Association, 'Concordia', to be held in the Theater an der Wien on 9 December 1878. The proceeds from this charity musical event were promised for the pension fund of the 'Concordia' and Johann had agreed to conduct his overture personally. As could have been anticipated, Vienna's pressmen reported extensively on their own trade association's festivity, and most included mention of the Waltz King's particular contribution. The reviewer for the Illustrirtes Wiener Extrablatt (10.12.1878) concentrated on the reaction of the audience to the musical novelty: Greeted with tempestuous applause, Johann Strauss stepped up to the conductor's rostrum. Barely a minute later, dainty fingers could be seen strumming on the sills of the boxes and in the stalls heads swayed to-and-fro like water lilies enjoying delightful thoughts. A teasing polka and a roguish waltz play blind man's buff [= Blindekuh] with each other in Strauss's overture; they seek to play tag, to hold on to each other - a wonderful game - in which the public joined with such delight that Strauss had to repeat the whale overture. A large laurel wreath was presented to the maestro. The verdict of the Fremden-Blatt (10.12.1878) was no less favourable. It is a richly-instrumented capriccio with an effective crescendo, bringing together melodies of a truly Straussian character which we shall find again in the eagerly awaited new operetta by the Viennese maestro.

    Sadly, the eagerly awaited Blindekuh did not match the public's expectation of the piece. This, together with the generally unfavourable reviews which followed the opening night, led to the new stage work surviving only a total of sixteen performances. Strauss bore the failure badly. On Thursday 26 December 1878 he made an appearance at the Musikverein to conduct the première public concert performance of the operetta's overture at his brother Eduard's promenade concert with the Strauss Orchestra. Once again the piece enjoyed a complete triumph.

  • Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube HD

    11:00

    Johann Strauss II, The Blue Danube HD Blue Danube (German: An der Donau schönen blauen, On the Beautiful Blue Danube), Op 314, is a waltz composed by Johann Strauss II which premiered at the Wiener Männergesangsverein on February 13, 1867. waltz
    Lyrics
    Donau so blau,
    so schön und blau,
    durch Tal und Au
    wogst ruhig du hin,
    dich grüßt unser Wien,
    dein silbernes Band
    knüpft Land an Land,
    und fröhliche Herzen schlagen
    an deinem schönen Strand.

    Weit vom Schwarzwald her
    eilst du hin zum Meer,
    spendest Segen
    allerwegen,
    ostwärts geht dein Lauf,
    nimmst viel Brüder auf:
    Bild der Einigkeit
    für alle Zeit!
    Alte Burgen seh'n
    nieder von den Höh'n,
    grüssen gerne
    dich von ferne
    und der Berge Kranz,
    hell vom Morgenglanz,
    spiegelt sich in deiner Wellen Tanz.

    Die Nixen auf dem Grund,
    die geben's flüsternd kund,
    was Alles du erschaut,
    seit dem über dir der Himmel blaut.
    Drum schon in alter Zeit
    ward dir manch' Lied geweiht;
    und mit dem hellsten Klang
    preist immer auf's Neu' dich unser Sang.

    Halt' an deine Fluten bei Wien,
    es liebt dich ja so sehr!
    Du findest, wohin du magst zieh'n,
    ein zweites Wien nicht mehr!
    Hier quillt aus voller Brust
    der Zauber heit'rer Lust,
    und treuer, deutscher Sinn
    streut aus seine Saat von hier weithin.

    Du kennst wol gut deinen Bruder, den Rhein,
    an seinen Ufern wächst herrlicher Wein,
    dort auch steht bei Tag und bei Nacht
    die feste treue Wacht.
    Doch neid' ihm nicht jene himmlische Gab',
    bei dir auch strämt reicher Segen herab,
    und es schützt die tapfere Hand
    auch unser Heimatland!

    D'rum laßt uns einig sein,
    schliesst Brüder, fest den Reih'n,
    froh auch in trüber Zeit,
    Muth, wenn Gefahr uns dräut,
    Heimat am Donaustrand,
    bist uns'rer Herzen Band,
    dir sei für alle Zeit
    Gut und Blut geweiht!

    Das Schifflein fährt auf den Wellen so sacht,
    still ist die Nacht,
    die Liebe nur wacht,
    der Schiffer flüstert der Liebsten ins Ohr,
    dass längst schon sein Herz sie erkor.
    O Himmel, sei gnädig dem liebenden Paar,
    schutz' vor Gefahr es immerdar!
    Nun fahren dahin sie in seliger Ruh',
    Schifflein, far' immer nur zu!

    Junges Blut,
    frischer Muth,
    o wie glücklich macht,
    dem vereint ihr lacht!
    Lieb und Lust
    schwellt die Brust,
    hat das Größte in der Welt vollbracht.

    Nun singt ein fröhliches seliges Lied,
    das wie jauchzend die Lüfte durchzieht,
    von den Herzen laut widerklingt
    und ein festes Band um uns schlingt.

    Frei und treu in Lied und Tat,
    bringt ein Hoch der Wienerstadt,
    die auf's Neu' erstand voller Pracht
    und die Herzen erobert mit Macht.

    Und zum Schluß
    bringt noch einen Gruß
    uns'rer lieben Donau dem herrlichen Fluß.
    Was der Tag
    uns auch bringen mag,
    Treu' und Einigkeit
    soll uns schützen zu jeglicher Zeit!

  • Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II

    4:06

    Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II

  • Vienna Blood Waltz - Johann Strauss Jr.

    7:11

    Vienna Blood Waltz

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Annen-Polka op. 117 - Johann Strauss II

    4:21

    Annen-Polka op 117 from Neujahrskonzert 2009. Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).
    Conductor: Daniel Barenboim & Wiener Philharmoniker

  • Johann Strauss:Emperor Waltz Op. 437

    11:56

    Berliner Philharmoniker

  • Johann Strauss II - Wiener Bonbons - Walzer, Op. 307

    8:39

    Wiener Bonbons, one of the most inspired and popular of Johann Strauss's waltzes, owes its origins to the ball of the Association of Industrial Societies held in the Redoutensaal ballroom of the Imperial Hofburg Palace, Vienna, on 28 January 1866.

    Even a year before composing the most famous of all waltzes, An der schönen blauen Donau (By the beautiful blue Danube, 1867), Johann had begun to draw back a little from the arduous business of writing waltzes and had been pleased to allow his younger brother, Josef, not only to compose the due dedication for the Industrial Societies' festivity but also to conduct it on the night of the ball. It then became known that honorary patronage of the event had been accepted by Princess Pauline Metternich-Winneburg (1836-1921), the highly respected wife of the Austrian Ambassador in Paris, and that she had asked for the proceeds from the ball to be donated to the construction of a hospital for Germans in the French capital. For this reason Josef entitled his waltz Deutsche Grüße (German Greetings, op. 191), and dedicated it to the patroness who was present at the ball. In addition he altered his plans to conduct the first performance of a new polka-mazurka, entitled Pauline (op. 190a), at a Strauss benefit ball in the Sofienbad-Saal on 29 January, playing it instead at the ball of the Industrial Societies as a further tribute to the princess. Shortly before the Industrial Societies' Ball, however, Johann chose to contribute a waltz of his own to the festivity, a dance combining the traditional Viennese Waltz with Parisian flair and which even united the languages of both nations in its title - Wiener Bonbons! The waltz was published by C.A. Spina on 13 February 1866 and its delightful title page illustration, showing the work's title fashioned from twisted bonbon wrappers, bore its composer's dedication to her Highness the Princess Pauline Metternich-Winneburg, nee Countess Sándor, in deepest respect.

    Princess Pauline was not only an influential figure in Vienna, but was also highly active at the Imperial court of Napoléon III in Paris. The two Strauss brothers therefore openly courted her support, knowing that her connections could assist them in their plans to give concerts at the 1867 World Exhibition in the French capital. To this end the brothers intended to make an exploratory joint visit there during Easter 1866, just weeks after the Industrial Societies' Ball. (In the event, Johann undertook the conducting of concerts at the World Exhibition alone, and amongst his engagements in the city on the Seine during summer 1867 was a sumptuous ball at the Austrian Embassy hosted by the Ambassador, Prince Richard Metternich, and his wife, Princess Pauline. On this occasion the waltz An der schonen blauen Donau was played for the first time in Paris, doubtless alongside Wiener Bonbons.)

  • “Circassian March”, Johann Strauss Jr.

    4:54

    “Circassian March, Op. 335” [“Tscherkessen-Marsch”], Johann Strauss II, 1869.

    Berlin Philharmonic, conducted by Herbert von Karajan.

    This masterpiece was written by Strauss during his tour of Russia in the 1860s. “Circassian March” was premiered in St. Petersburg in 1869. On his return to Vienna, Strauss re-released the piece as “Egyptian March” [“Ägyptischer Marsch”], as it was adapted to the opening of the Suez Canal in November 1869.

    Johann Strauss II (1825-1899) was an Austrian composer of waltzes, polkas, marches, and operettas. Strauss was known as “Waltz King”. His most famous works include “The Blue Danube”, “Kaiser-Walzer” [“Emperor Waltz”], “Tales from the Vienna Woods”, and “Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka”. Strauss’ best known operettas include “Die Fledermaus” and “Der Zigeunerbaron”.

  • Johann Strauss - Annen-Polka

    4:27

    After you've enjoyed this video, you may checkout this video:



    New Year's Concert of the Vienna Philharmonic 2009
    The venerable live concert is the largest world-wide event in classical music reaching over a billion people annually thru radio & tv in up to 100 countries. Since the concert takes well too long, we just cut out & share with you: The Annen-Polka by Johann Strauss (Son).

  • Perpetuum Mobile - A Musical Joke - Johann Strauss Jr.

    3:06

    Perpetuum Mobile - A Musical Joke

    Johann Strauss, Jr.

  • Johann Strauss II - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, Op. 214

    2:40

    Shortly before Johann Strauss returned to Vienna after completing his third summer concert season at Pavlovsk near St. Petersburg, an announcement appeared in the Wiener Allgemeine Theaterzeitung on 24 September 1858: Herr Kapellmeister Johann Strauss has completed the following compositions during his stay in St. Petersburg this year, and they will appear in due course from Carl Haslinger: 'Mes adieux à St. Petersbourg' [op. 210], 'Bon-Bon' - Polka française [op. 213], 'Tritsch-Tratsch' Schnellpolka, 'Szechenyi-Tänze' Walzer [= Gedankenflug Walzer op. 215]. Yet, while Tritsch-Tratsch may well have been sketched, or even completed, in Russia, Strauss did not perform it there until the following season, on 22 May 1859 (= 10 May, Russian calendar).

    Upon returning to his native city, Strauss made his first public appearance at a concert in the Volksgarten on 21 November 1858, performing the Viennese premières of the Abschied von St. Petersburg Walzer op. 210, Champagner-Polka op. 211, Fürst Bariatinsky-Marsch op. 212 and Bonbon-Polka op. 213. Three days later, on 24 November, sharing the conducting with his brother Josef at a concert in the intimate surroundings of 'Zum grossen Zeisig', a tavern on the Burgglacis (today, Burggasse 2) in the suburb of Neubau, Johann played these pieces again, introducing an additional novelty - the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. The new work proved a sensation, prompting the Wiener Allgemeine Theaterzeitung to state in its edition of 27 November 1858: Johann Strauss's enormously successful 'Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka', which has been received with the most tempestuous applause, will appear in the next few days from Carl Haslinger. No dance composition of such freshness, humorous colouring and piquant instrumentation can have appeared for years. Demand for the new work was so overwhelming that Haslinger was obliged to change his publishing programme: the piano arrangement of the polka was written out in just a few hours and its first printed edition was announced on 1 December 1858. By the time this advertisement appeared in the Fremden-Blatt, however, the first edition had been sold out and Haslinger was forced into the first of several reprints. The new polka also appealed to Vienna's folk singers - chief amongst them Johann Baptist Moser (1799-1863) - who immediately added lyrics and further helped to spread the work's popularity.

    Although Strauss may have conceived the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka in Russia, the stimulus for the polka's title most definitely stemmed from Vienna. On 7 March 1858 a new paper had appeared on Vienna's news-stands: entitled Tritsch-Tratsch and described as a humorous, satirical weekly publication, it was a successor to the short-lived Der Teufel in Wien (The Devil in Vienna) which had ceased with its issue of 25 February 1858. The new publication was edited by the successful writer and folk singer Anton Varry and counted among its principal contributors O.F. Berg and Josef Wimmer - all three of whom were friends, or at least acquaintances, of Johann Strauss. The Wiener Allgemeine Theaterzeitung (7.03.1858) praised the appearance of this Viennese popular weekly, noting particularly that It is handsomely put together; paper, print and especially the woodcut met with very great approval. The woodcut referred to was A. Carl's entertaining masthead engraving on the front page, showing the title Tritsch-Tratsch and depicting an elephant clambering from the mouth of a jovial carnival jester - an allegoric portrayal of telling whoppers - together with a small inset of the Stephansdom (St. Stephen's Cathedral) in Vienna. Yet if Varry's publication was new, his choice of title for it harked back a quarter of a century to 1833 to Der Tritschtratsch, a one-act burlesque (with music by Adolf Müller senior) by the great Austrian dramatist and actor Johann Nepomuk Nestroy (1801-62), which was still in the repertoire of Vienna's theatres. A quotation from the farce, ... aus der Mücken einen Elefanten macht ... (literally to make a midge out of an elephant but colloquially meaning to make a mountain out of a molehill), further explains the elephantine imagery in the masthead illustration of Varry's publication.

    Such was the background to the charming engraving which adorns the first piano edition of Johann Strauss's Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. The Haslinger issue reproduces the open-mouthed jester with the elephant and Stephansdom, and even borrows its lettering style from the humorous paper, but it also makes some charming additions: prominently featured are the gossiping wives from Nestroy's farce and - of course - that Viennese popular weekly, Tritsch-Tratsch! Doubtless Varry and his colleagues wished they could have competed on more equal terms with Strauss's rumbustious and evergreen polka: the comic paper was to enjoy only limited success and ceased publication before reaching its second anniversary.

  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, op. 410

    6:00

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

  • Johann Strauss Jr - Treasure Waltz

    8:41

    Johann Strauss Jr

    Treasure Waltz

  • Johann Strauss - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka

    3:31

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, Op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    7:55

    Jakarta Concert Orchestra
    Avip Priatna, konduktor
    Isyana Sarasvati, sopran

    Konser LIVE Invitation To The Dance, 2018. Di Ciputra Artpreneur Theater, Jakarta Selatan.

    About:



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  • Johann Strauss II - Im Krapfenwald’l Polka, Op. 336, In Krapfens Woods

    5:46

    Kacper Woźniakowski - cuckoo
    Oskar Kucharski - conductor
    Symphony Orchestra of The Józef Marcin Żebrowski Music School in Częstochowa, Poland
    La Folle Journée de Varsovie
    recorded at Polish National Opera House in Warsaw, september 27, 2016

  • Johann Strauss II - Abschieds-Walzer Op.posth

    10:25

    Honorables miembros y usuarios de youtube sean bienvenidos a una nueva emisiòn de este su lindo canal MrJohannStraussViena,presentando:

    Obra.- Abschieds-Walzer Op.posth
    Compositor.- Johann Strauss II

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  • Johann Strauss II: Die Fledermaus / Carlos Kleiber

    1:46:06

    Personnel:
    Hermann Prey, baritone
    Julia Varady, soprano
    Lucia Popp, soprano
    René Kollo, tenor
    Ivan Rebroff, bass
    Bernd Weikl, baritone
    Bayerischer Staatsopernchor
    Bayerisches Staatsorchester
    Carlos Kleiber, conductor

    Digitally remastered. Source: FLAC (tracks) 24 bit/96 kHz

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