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Playlist of Johann Strauss

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  • Johann STRAUSS - The Greatest Hits

    1:14:06

    Johann Strauss - The Greatest Hits (Full album) 2014 / FULL HD
    State Symphony Orchestra of the USSR Ministry of Culture & Pavel Kogan

    01. Sounds of Spring Waltz, Op. 410
    02. Viennese Waltz, Op. 307
    03. Backgammon Polka, Op. 214
    04. Radetzky March, Op. 228
    05. Blue Danube, Op. 314
    06. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 449
    07. The Gypsy Baron Quadrille, Op. 422
    08. Polka-Mazurka, Fata Morgana, Op. 330
    09. In Krapfenvale, Op. 336
    10. A woman's heart, Op. 166
    11. Feast of Fire, Polka, Op. 269
    12. Artist's Life, Op. 316
    13. Hunting Polka, Op. 373
    14. You are my treasure, Op. 418
    15. Polka thunder and lightning, Op. 324
    16. Vienna, woman and song, Op. 333

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  • The Best of Strauss

    2:43

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    THE BEST OF STRAUSS II

    01. Emperor Waltz (Kaiser-Walzer) Op. 437 00:00
    02. Strauss I - Radetzky March Op. 228 11:57
    03. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen) Waltz, Op. 410 14:54
    04. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der Schönen Blauen Donau) Waltz, Op. 314 21:49
    05. Chit-Chat (Tritsch-Tratsch) Polka, Op. 214 32:42
    06. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 35:21
    07. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons) Waltz, Op. 307 44:10
    08. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz, Op. 325 53:46
    09. Love Songs (Liebeslieder) Waltz, Op. 114 1:06:20
    10. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden) Waltz, Op. 388 1:15:10
    11. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz, Op. 443 1:24:26
    12. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz, Op. 234 1:33:56
    13. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 1:42:55
    14. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka, Op. 139 1:52:21
    15. Pizzicato Polka, Op. 234 1:55:06
    16. Polka Schnell, Op. 281 1:57:49

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    The very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Ravel, Dvorák…

    #classicalmusic #classical #waltz #strauss

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  • My Top 10 Favorite Johann Strauss 1,2 Waltzes

    1:29:52

    Download this waltzes here :
    1.Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen) Waltz, Op. 410. 0:00
    2.Emperor Waltz (Kaiser-Walzer) Op. 437 5:29
    3.On the Beautiful Blue Danube Waltz, Op. 314 17:02
    4. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz, Op. 234 27:54
    5.Roses from the South Waltz, Op. 388 36:22
    6.Be Embraced, You Millions Waltz, Op. 443 45:14
    7.Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz, Op. 325 54:35
    8.Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz, Op. 354 1:05
    9. Love Songs (Liebeslieder) Waltz, Op. 114 1:12
    10.Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons) Waltz, Op. 307 1:20
    Checkout more on my channel:

  • Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz

    10:59

    Disscuss/Review The Blue Danube Waltz at

    Title : Johann Strauss II , The Blue Danube Waltz
    Date : 1867

    From Wikipedia,The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau op. 314 (On the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by Johann Strauss II, composed in 1867. Originally performed 9 February 1867 at a concert of the Wiener Männergesangsverein (Vienna Men's Choral Association), it has been one of the most consistently popular pieces of music in the classical repertoire. Its initial performance was only a mild success, however, and Strauss is reputed to have said The devil take the waltz, my only regret is for the coda -- I wish that had been a success!

    The waltz originally had an accompanying song text written by Josef Weyl. Strauss adapted it into a purely orchestral version for the World's Fair in Paris that same year, and it became a great success in this form. The instrumental version is by far the most commonly performed today. An alternate text by Franz von Gernerth, Donau so blau (Danube so blue), is also used on occasion.

    The sentimental Viennese connotations of the piece have made it into a sort of unofficial Austrian national anthem. It is a traditional encore piece at the annual Vienna New Year's Concert. The first few bars are also the interval signal of Osterreich Rundfunk's overseas programs.

    It is reported by composer Norman Lloyd in his Golden Encyclopedia of Music that when asked by Frau Strauss for an autograph, the composer Johannes Brahms autographed Mrs. Strauss's fan by writing on it the first few bars of the Blue Danube. Under it he wrote Unfortunately not by Johannes Brahms.The work commences with an extended introduction in the key of A major with shimmering (tremolo) violins and a French horn spelling out the familiar waltz theme, answered by staccato wind chords, in a subdued mood. It rises briefly into a loud passage but quickly dies down into the same restful nature of the opening bars. A contrasting and quick phrase in D major anticipates the waltz before 3 quiet downward-moving bass notes usher in the first principal waltz melody.

    The first waltz theme is familiar gently rising triad motif in cellos and horns in the tonic D major, accompanied by harps; the Viennese waltz beat is accentuated at the end of each 3-note phrase. The Waltz 1A triumphantly ends its rounds of the motif, and waltz 1B follows in the same key; the genial mood is still apparent.

    Waltz 2A glides in quietly (still in D major) before a short contrasting middle section in B flat major. The entire section is repeated.

    A more dour waltz 3A is introduced in G major before a fleeting eighth-note melodic phrase (waltz 3B). An loud Intrada (introduction) is then played. Waltz 4A starts off in a romantic mood (F major) before a more joyous waltz 4B in the same key.

    After another short Intrada in A, cadencing in F-sharp minor, sonorous clarinets spell out the poignant melody of waltz 5A in A. Waltz 5B is the climax, punctuated by cymbal crashes. Each of these may be repeated at the discretion of the performer.

    The coda recalls earlier sections (3A and 2A) before furious chords usher in a recap of the romantic Waltz 4A. The idyll is cut short as the waltz hurries back to the famous waltz theme 1A again. This statement is cut short, however, by the final codetta: a variation of 1A is presented, connecting to a rushing eighth-note passage in the final few bars: repeated tonic chords underlined by a snare drumroll and a bright-sounding flourish.

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  • Johann Strauss - Roses from the South 南国のバラ

    8:53



    This is my personal favourite orchestral version of this marvellous waltz. Played by Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Conductor: Robert Stolz (!)

    Robert Stolz himself is known as the last composer of the classical viennese aera. He was the one who knew best how a Strauss waltz has to be arranged and how the orchestra has to play it. That's why I adore this recording so much! It's 100% authentic and even the Vienna Philharmonics won't do it better.
    __________________________________

    #5 im Programm des Neujahrskonzerts 2009 in Wien
    #5 of New Year's Concert 2009 in Vienna
    #5 ニューイヤーコンサート 2009

    _______

    Rosen aus dem Sueden, Roses from the South, Roses du Sud, Rose dal Sud, Rosas del Sur 南国のバラ

    ヨハン・シュトラウス2世
    요한 슈트라우스 2세
    小約翰·史特勞斯

  • The Best of Johann Strauss

    1:53:03

    Johann Strauss II (born Johann Baptist Strauss; 25 October 1825 – 3 June 1899), also known as Johann Strauss Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), son of Johann Strauss I, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.

    Strauss had two younger brothers, Josef and Eduard Strauss, who became composers of light music as well, although they were never as well known as their elder brother. Some of Johann Strauss's most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer (Emperor Waltz), Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

    Johann Strauss

    Tracklist:
    1. Abertura de la opereta: O Barão Cigano
    2. Polka de Ana, Op. 117
    3. Valsa do Imperador, Op. 437
    4. Klange aus der Raimundzeit, Op. 479
    5. Polka Tritsch-Tratsch, Op. 214
    6. Vinho, Mulheres e Canto, Op. 333
    7. Polka Champagne, Op. 211
    8. Czardas da Opereta: O Morcego
    9. Polka Im Krapfenwald'l, Op. 336
    10. Abertura de Opereta: Uma noite em Veneza
    11. Vinho, Mulheres e Canto, Op. 333
    12. Valsa do Imperador, Op. 437
    13. Valsas - Canções de, Amor Op. 114
    14. Sangue Vienense, Op. 354
    15. Rosas do Sul, Op. 388
    16. Valsas do Tesouro, Op 418

    For more:

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  • The Beautiful Blue Danube - André Rieu

    8:14

    André Rieu & his Johann Strauss Orchestra playing The Beautiful Blue Danube (An der schönen blauen Donau) by composer Johann Strauss II. Recorded live at Empress Sisi's castle; Schönbrunn Palace Vienna, Austria with dancers from the famous Austrian Elmayer Dancing School.

    Clip from the DVD André Rieu At Schönbrunn, Vienna.
    One of André's biggest and most beautiful special ever.

    Tracklist:
    01. Einzugsmarsch
    02. Trumpet Voluntary
    03. Auf der Jagd
    04. Fächerpolonaise
    05. Rosen aus dem Süden
    06. Heia in den Bergen
    07. G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald
    08. Der dritte Mann
    09. Freunde, das Leben ist lebenswert
    10. Die Mädis vom Chantant
    11. Die Czárdásfürstin Potpourri
    12. Ohne Sorgen
    13. Feuerfest
    14. My Heart Will Go On
    15. Wenn ich mit meinem Dackel
    16. Heut' kommen d'Engerln auf Urlaub nach Wien
    17. Spiel mir das Lied von Glück und Treu
    18. Kaiserwalzer
    19. Ich gehör nur mir
    20. An der schönen blauen Donau
    21. Radetzky Marsch
    22. Als flotter Geist
    23. Wien du Stadt meiner Träume
    24. Musik, Musik!
    25. Anton aus Tirol
    26. Donauwalzer
    27. Strauss Party
    28. Adieu, mein kleiner Gardeoffizier

    For tour dates visit:



  • Johann Strauss - Annen-Polka

    4:27

    After you've enjoyed this video, you may checkout this video:



    New Year's Concert of the Vienna Philharmonic 2009
    The venerable live concert is the largest world-wide event in classical music reaching over a billion people annually thru radio & tv in up to 100 countries. Since the concert takes well too long, we just cut out & share with you: The Annen-Polka by Johann Strauss (Son).

  • Strauss ~ The Blue Danube Waltz

    9:24

    Classical music : Johann Strauss II - The Blue Danube Waltz op. 314 - With paintings slideshow background

    The Blue Danube is the common English title of An der schönen blauen Donau, Op. 314 (German for By the Beautiful Blue Danube), a waltz by the Austrian composer Johann Strauss II, composed in 1866.

    All the paintings in this video are in the public domain

    Thank you for watching! Have a great day! :)

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  • Strauss II - Waltzes, Polkas & Operettas | Classical Music Collection

    2:47:19

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    STRAUSS II
    WALTZES, POLKAS & OPERETTAS

    01. Voices of Spring (Frühlingsstimmen), Waltz Op. 410 00:00
    02. Roses from the South (Rosen aus dem Süden), Waltz Op. 388 07:31
    03. On the Beautiful Blue Danube (An der schönen blauen Donau), Waltz Op. 314 17:11
    04. Acceleration (Accelerationen) Waltz Op. 234 28:35
    05. Treasure Waltz (Schatz-Walzer), Op. 418 37:29
    06. Where the Lemon Trees Bloom (Wo die Citronen blüh'n), Waltz Op. 346 45:53
    07. Be Embraced, You Millions! (Seid umschlungen, Millionen!) Waltz Op. 443 55:36
    08. Viennese Sweets (Wiener Bonbons), Waltz Op. 307 01:05:32
    09. Artist's Life (Künstlerleben) Waltz Op. 316 01:14:56
    10. Tales from the Vienna Woods (G'schichten aus dem Wienerwald) Waltz Op. 325 01:25:18
    11. Wine, Women and Song (Wein, Weib und Gesang) Waltz Op. 333 01:38:04
    12. Morning Journals (Morgenblätter), Op. 279 01:43:40
    13. Love Songs (Liebeslieder), Waltz Op. 114 01:54:48
    14. Viennese Blood (Wiener Blut) Waltz Op. 354 02:04:20
    15. Annen-Polka Op. 117 02:13.33
    16. Light Blood (Leichtes Blut) Polka Op. 319 02:16:36
    17. Tritsch-Tratsch Polka Op. 214 02:19:17
    18. Thunder & Lightning (Unter Donner und Blitz) Polka Op. 324 02:21:50
    19. Long live the Magyar (Éljen a Magyar! ), Polka Op. 332 02:24:53
    20. The Gypsy Baron: Ouverture 02:27:38
    21. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: March. Hurrah, die Schlacht 02:29:55
    22. The Gypsy Baron, Act III: Finale. Reich' ihm die Hand 02:32:44
    23. Persian March, Op. 289 02:33:47
    24. Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 02:36:04
    25. The Bat (Die Fledermaus): Ouverture 02:38:58

    Tracks 1-2, 10 & 25 performed by Vilnius Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 3, 20 & 22 performed by Donetsk Orchestra, Silvano Frontalini
    Tracks 4-9, 11-19 & 23-24 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    Track 21 performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Donetsk Chorus, Stefan Marzcik

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

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    #classicalmusic #strauss #waltz #polka #operetta

  • Johann Strauss II - Voices of Spring Waltz

    5:33

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

    In its purely orchestral version the Frühlingsstimmen Walzer was played for the first time on 18 March 1883 when the composer's brother, Eduard Strauss, conducted it with the Strauss Orchestra at one of his regular Sunday afternoon concerts in the Goldene Saal (Golden Hall) of the Musikverein building in Vienna. This première also met with great success and the waltz had to be encored.

  • Strauss II - Greatest Waltzes Collection

    2:25:57

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    STRAUSS II
    Greatest Waltzes Collection

    01 Schatz-Walzer (Treasure Waltz) Op. 418 00:00
    02 Rosen aus dem Süden (Roses from the South) Op. 388 08:25
    03 Frühlingsstimmen (Voices of Spring), Op. 410 18:07
    04 Wein, Weib und Gesang (Wine, Women and Song) Op. 333 25:40
    05 An der Schonen Blauen Donau (On the Beautiful Blue Danube) Op. 314 31:18
    06 Kaiser Walzer (Emperor Waltz), Op. 437 42:42
    07 Wiener Bonbons (Vienna Sweets) Waltz Op. 307 54:36
    08 Wo die Citronen Blüh'n! (Where the Lemon Trees Bloom), Op. 364 1:04:02
    09 Seid umschlungen, Millionen! (Be Embraced, You Millions!) Waltz Op. 443 1:13:48
    10 Accellerationen (Accelerations) Waltz, Op. 234 1:23:49
    11 Künstlerleben (Artist’s Life) Op. 316 1:32:44
    12 Morgenblätter (Morning Journals), Op. 279 1:43:10
    13 Wiener Blut (Viennese Blood) Op. 354 1:54:20
    14 Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald (Tales from the Vienna Woods) Op. 325 2:03:36
    15 Liebeslieder (Love Songs) Op. 114 2:16:24

    1, 4, 8-13: performed by Stettino Philharmonic Orchestra, Stefan Marzcik
    2, 3, 6 & 14: performed by Vilnius Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    5 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini
    15 performed by Donetsk Philharmonic Orchestra cond. by Silvano Frontalini

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century. Strauss was admired by other prominent composers: Richard Wagner once admitted that he liked the waltz Wein, Weib und Gesang Op. 333. Johannes Brahms was a personal friend of Strauss; the latter dedicated his waltz Be Embraced, You Millions!, Op. 443, to him.

    Thank you so much for watching this video by Halidon Music channel, we hope you enjoyed it! Don't forget to share it and subscribe to our channel

    All the best classical music ever on Halidon Music Youtube Channel: the very best of Mozart, Beethoven, Bach, Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Vivaldi, Schubert, Handel, Liszt, Haydn, Strauss, Verdi, Brahms, Wagner, Mahler, Rossini, Ravel, Grieg, Dvorák…

    #classicalmusic #classical #straussii

  • Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    8:31

    Discuss/review/recommend the work at

    Title : Johann Strauss II - Die Fledermaus Overture

    From Wikipedia,
    Die Fledermaus (in English: The Bat;' in French: La Chauve-souris') is an operetta composed by Johann Strauss II to a German libretto by Carl Haffner and Richard Genée.

    The original source for Die Fledermaus is a farce by German playwright Julius Roderich Benedix (1811--1873), Das Gefängnis (The Prison). Another source is a French vaudeville play, Le réveillon, by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. This was first translated by Carl Haffner into a non-musical play to be produced in Vienna. However, the peculiarly French custom of the réveillon (a midnight supper party) caused problems, which were solved by the decision to adapt the play as a libretto for Johann Strauss, with the réveillon replaced by a Viennese ball. At this point Haffner's translation was handed over for adaptation to Richard Genée, who subsequently claimed not only that he had made a fresh translation from scratch but that he had never even met Haffner.

    The operetta premièred on April 5, 1874 at the Theater an der Wien in Vienna, Austria and has been part of the regular operetta repertoire ever since. It currently appears as number 19 on Opera America's list of the 20 most-performed operatic works in North America.

  • The best of Johann Strauss II

    1:13:51

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    Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)


    1.Voices of Spring, Op. 410, 0:00
    2.Tritsch-Tratsch Polka, Op. 214 6:59
    3.Emperor Waltz, Op. 437 9:42
    4.Annen Polka, Op. 117 21:45
    5.Enjoy Your Life, Waltz, Op. 340 24:46
    6.Egyptian March, Op. 335 33:10
    7.Vienna Blood Waltz, Op. 354 37:18
    8.Thunder & Lightning, Op. 324 46:47
    9.Die Fledermaus Waltz, Op. 367 50:06
    10.Perpetuum Mobile, Op. 257 57:00
    11.Bandit's Gallop, Op. 276 1:00:09
    12.Blue Danube, Op. 314 1:02:57

  • Johann Strauss: Overtures and marches

    1:8:00

    Selection of operett overtures and marches by Johann Strauss II.

    01. The Bat Overture 00:00
    02. Egyptian March 08:30
    03. Franz Joseph I March 12:35
    04. The Gypsy Baron Overture 16:03
    05. The Gypsy Baron March 24:16
    06. One Night in Venice Overture 27:18
    07. Russian March 34:47
    08. Cagliostro in Wien Overture 38:15
    09. Napoleon March 45:20
    10. Persian March 48:12
    11. Prinz Methusalem Overture 50:15
    12. Spanish March 55:58
    13. Indigo and the forty thieves Overture 01:00:47

  • Johann Strauss II - Tales from the Vienna Woods Waltz

    11:01

    The decorative first piano edition of Johann Strauss's evocative waltz Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald carries the composer's respectful dedication to his Highness Prince Constantin Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst (1828-1896), and the work was almost certainly given its world première at a private soirée in the prince's 16th-century palace in the Augarten, Vienna, during summer 1868. An undated letter from that year, written to the composer by Princess Marie Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst, reads: Dear Sir, The performance of your beautiful waltz gave me such pleasure recently -- that I cannot help asking you kindly to accept a small memento of the unforgettable evening. It is to remind you of another of your finely-chiselled masterpieces, by the blue Danube -- whose sound reminds us all of happy hours. With repeated thanks and greatest respect. Fürstin zu Hohenlohe. (The nature of the Princess's memento is unfortunately not known). Since May 1867 Prince Constantin had held the position of First Master of the Royal Household and had lived in the Augarten residence with his wife Marie (née Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein), the daughter of Franz Liszt's long-term mistress Princess Carolyne Wittgenstein. Through Marie's connections the Augarten Palace, situated on the opposite side of the Danube Canal from the inner city of Vienna, became a focal point of cultural life in the Austrian capital. (After the Second World War it became, and has remained, the home of the Vienna Boys' Choir).

    On 22 June 1868 Johann Strauss conducted a public performance of Geschichten aus dem Wienerwald before an audience of five thousand at the 'Sommerliedertafel' (Summer Song Programme) of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) held in Karl Schwender's 'Neue Welt' entertainment establishment in the Vienna suburb of Hietzing. Yet this was no public première: three days earlier in the Volksgarten, at an 'Extraordinary Novelty Festival with Fireworks, for the Benefit of Josef and Eduard Strauss' on 19 June, Johann himself conducted the new work to great applause and was obliged to repeat it four times. A particularly strong impression was made by the waltz's expansive Introduction of 122 bars, a rustic tone-poem evocative of the countryside of the Wienerwald, the wooded eastern foothills of the Alps, situated just north-west of Vienna. It is curious to reflect, therefore, that at no time in his life did the composer himself undertake walks in the Vienna Woods -- indeed, he expressed a lifelong fear of climbing even the most gentle of hills! Through the use of zither (replaced on this recording by an optional string ensemble) and Ländler-style rhythms in the Introduction and Coda, Strauss emphasises the close ties between the Viennese Waltz and the peasant music of Lower Austria. A zither-player pictured in a vignette on the cover of the first piano edition further underlines this connection, while the artist also depicts other commonplace scenes and pleasures to be enjoyed in the countryside -- shooting on a rifle range, a pair of lovers enjoying rural seclusion, and young men bowling at an outdoor skittle alley.

  • Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, Op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    7:55

    Jakarta Concert Orchestra
    Avip Priatna, konduktor
    Isyana Sarasvati, sopran

    Konser LIVE Invitation To The Dance, 2018. Di Ciputra Artpreneur Theater, Jakarta Selatan.

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  • Johann Strauss:Emperor Waltz Op. 437

    11:56

    Berliner Philharmoniker

  • Johann Strauss - Valzer

    1:6:01

    Orchestra Filarmonica di Vienna,
    Willi Boskovsky direttore

    0:00:07 Sul bel Danubio blu, Op.314
    0:09:20 Voci di primavera, Op.410
    0:15:26 Mille e una notte, Op.346
    0:23:52 Canti d'amore, Op.114
    0:30:35 Sangue viennese, Op.354
    0:38:45 Caramelle viennesi, Op.307
    0:47:21 Vita d'artista, Op.316
    0:55:46 Valzer dell'imperatore, Op.437

  • Johann Strauss - Vienna Waltz

    2:21

    One wonderful waltz of Johann Strauss
    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 -- June 3, 1899; also known as fully Johann Baptist Strauss, and Johann Strauss, Jr. was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Strauss was born in St. Ulrich (now a part of Neubau), the son of Johann Strauss I, another composer of dance music. His father did not wish him to become a composer, but rather a banker; however, the son defied his father's wishes, and went on to study music with the composer Joseph Drechsler and the violin with Anton Kollmann, the ballet répétiteur of the Vienna Court Opera. Strauss had two younger brothers, Josef and Eduard Strauss, who became composers of light music as well, although they were never as well-known as their elder brother.
    Some of Johann Strauss's most famous works include The Blue Danube, Vienna Waltz, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, and the Pizzicato Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the most well-known.

  • x
  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen - Walzer, op. 410

    6:00

    In the winter of 1882/83 Johann Strauss was invited to compose a vocal waltz for the Heidelberg-born coloratura soprano, Bianca Bianchi (1855-1947) - real name, Bertha Schwarz - who was at that time an acclaimed member of the Wiener Hofoperntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre). The waltz was to be given its first performance on 1 March 1883 at a grand matinée charity performance at the Theater an der Wien in aid of the '[Emperor] Franz Joseph and [Empress] Elisabeth Foundation for Indigent Austro-Hungarian Subjects in Leipzig'. Strauss, after his success with choral waltzes, was excited by the challenge of writing a waltz for solo voice. The librettist, Richard Genée, with whom the composer was at that time collaborating on the operetta Eine Nacht in Venedig (1883), signified his willingness to provide the text to the waltz. In the event he was responsible also for the vocal setting of the new work.

    Late autumn 1882 saw Johann Strauss in Budapest, Vienna's sister city on the River Danube, for the first performance there of his operetta Der lustige Krieg (The Merry War, 1881). He was accompanied for the first time by Adèle Strauss (née Deutsch), a young widow who was to become his third wife. According to contemporary reports, it was at one of the private soirées given in his honour during this visit that Johann gave an impromptu concert and played piano duets with another of the guests, Franz Liszt. The two men had known each other well for more than thirty years (Strauss had dedicated his waltz Abschieds-Rufe op. 179 to Liszt in January 1856) and had met on a number of occasions. It seerns highly probable that it was this visit which provided the impetus for writing the waltz Frühlingsstimmen, a work which is by no means a typical 'Violin waltz' but rather a waltz for the piano. The following February Strauss returned to Budapest to conduct another performance of Der lustige Krieg and, on 4 February , met Liszt again when the two men were among the guests at a soirée hosted by the Hungarian writer Gustav Tarnoczy. The Fremdenblatt (7.02.1883) was one of several Viennese newspapers which carried a report, reprinted frorn the Hungarian press, of the improvised concert which took place on this evening. The entertainment began with Weber's Jubel Overture, played as a piano duet by Liszt and the lady of the house. Strauss turned the pages. After this Strauss sat down at the piano and played his latest, as yet unpublished, compositions. [Another report refers specifically to the Bianchi-Walzer!] After the concert there was a whist party, at which Liszt and Strauss sat opposite Messrs Moriz Wahlmann and Ignaz Brüll; as always, here also luck smiled on the Piano King [= Liszt]. The soirée ended with dancing, for the commencernent of which Strauss himself gave the signal by sitting at the piano and playing several of his waltzes. After that a gypsy band played until four o'clock in the morning.

    Johann was justifiably pleased with his Frühlingsstimmen Walzer and in February he notified interested parties of its publication by Cranz. He even sent a copy to a member of the Austrian Imperial Household, the Archduke Wilhelm Franz Karl who, on 17 February, replied to Dear Strauss!, thanking him for his exquisitely successful concert waltz. He continued: Yesterday evening I couldn't get enough of playing these capitivating melodies and had to begin again and again da capo. Please number among the most ardent and oldest adherents of your musical creations your grateful Archduke Wilhelm.

    Johann Strauss himself conducted the theatre orchestra at the première of Frühlingsstimmen on 1 March in the Theater an der Wien, and the performance was so well received by the audience that Bianca Bianchi had to repeat it immediately.

  • Johann Strauss Sr. Radetzky March performed by Vienna Philharmonic at new years concert 2011

    7:08

    Franz Welser-Möst conducts Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

  • Johann Strauss - El Danubio Azul

    10:06

    Johann Strauss - El Danubio Azul

  • Johann Strauss Gala Concert in Vienna with José Carreras and Zubin Mehta

    1:44:11

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999
    #ZubinMehta conducts the tenor #JoséCarreras and the soprano #AndreaRost

    Wiener Philharmoniker (Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor
    Andrea Rost - soloist
    José Carreras - soloist

    Subscribe:

    0:52 Einzugsmarsch from the Zigeunerbaron
    4:18 Im Sturmschritt, Polka
    7:15 Wiener Blut, Waltz
    16:17 Stadt und Land, Polka Mazur
    21:14 Nur fort!, Polka
    24:34 Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka
    28:05 Overture Die Fledermaus
    37:04 Csárdás from Die Fledermaus
    43:00 Loreley-Rhein-Klänge, Waltz
    50:50 Beliebte Annen-Polka
    53:15 Sperl Galopp
    55:53 Im Krapfenwald'l, Polka française
    1:00:39 Wiener Bonbons, Waltz
    1:09:59 Wer uns getraut from Der Zigeunerbaron
    1:15:16 Unter Donner und Blitz, Polka
    1:19:06 Gondellied from Eine Nacht in Venedig
    1:24:15 Duett from Wiener Blut
    1:28:13 An der schönen blauen Donau, Waltz
    1:38:00 Johann Strauss - Radetzky-Marsch

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.

    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Johann Strauss II - Thousand and one Nights Waltz

    9:14

    Before eventually reaching the stage on 10 February 1871 as Indigo und die vierzig Räuber (Indigo and the Forty Thieves), Johann Strauss's début stage work had undergone several changes of name, and one can imagine the confusion in the minds of Vienna's theatre-going public as they read in their newspapers first of Ali Baba, then Fantaska and then Vierzig Räuber. The Morgen-Post (4.12.1870) found the situation laughable: They still shilly-shally between the names 'Fantaska', 'Espritta', 'Hildalga', 'Grazietta', 'Gitana', 'Varietta', 'Amora', 'Amanda', 'Zizine', 'Florinde', 'Lorina', 'Zerbina', 'Bimbona', 'Friola', 'Dryana', 'Uldalma', and several dozen more sonorous women's names. (Thirty-five years later, in 1906, Strauss's operetta was triumphantly re-worked under yet another title: Tausend und eine Nacht, a name harking back of to Antoine Galland's original 18th-century translation of this collection of oriental tales, The Thousand and One Nights).

    Tausend und eine Nacht was also the evocative title Johann Strauss gave to the splendid orchestral waltz he arranged from melodies in his first-born operetta. The composer had intended to unveil the waltz as his dedication dance for the ball of the powerful Vienna Authors' and Journalists' Association, 'Concordia', to be held in the Sofienbad-Saal on 7 February 1871. When the date set for the premiere of Indigo was postponed until 10 February, however, he found himself in the embarrassing position of having promised the waltz to the 'Concordia', yet wishing to avoid pre-empting the première of his operetta with an orchestral selection of what he knew to be its most charming melodies. In the event, believing that he depended upon the goodwill of the journalists, he presented the Association with his Tausendundeine Nacht-Polka - based on themes from the operetta - which he personally conducted at their ball, and which was later published under the amended title: Shawl-Polka française op. 343. It was therefore left to Eduard Strauss to perform the première of the waltz Tausend und eine Nacht at his Sunday promenade concert in the Golden Hall of the Vienna Musikverein on 12 March 1871. The programme of music also included the Indigo Overture and the Indigo-Quadrille op. 344.

    Reviewing the first night of Indigo und die vierzig Räuber in the Fremden-Blatt on 12 February 1871, the journalist Ludwig Speidel observed: How lightly skipping, how charmingly gossiping, how irresistibly coquettish are his polkas and his quadrilles, how cosy, convivial, piquant and ingenious they are. But if all these charms do not avail, the magician has one last remedy that never fails - he has his waltz! It is his 'Pied Piper of Hamelin'; there is nothing for it - everyone has to join in. Strauss has proved his magic powers in that Trio of the first Act which culminates in a waltz. It is a Viennese waltz of truly elemental power, born not very far from Lerchenfeld [a suburb of Vienna], stirringly melodic, of piquant, rhythmic features and bewitchingly instrumented. Another eyewitness, the journalist Josef Wimmer, praised the same vocal waltz: And when the star number of the evening, the waltz 'Ja, so singt man, in der Stadt wo ich geboren' [Yes, that's how they sing in the city where I was born], was played, the whole house broke out into a jubilant shout, the occupants of the boxes and the stalls began to dance and the gallery was overtaken by a regular Viennese * 'sell my clothes mood'. One almost believed that Strauss would tear the violin from the hands of the first violinist and strike up the dance as in the days of old at the 'Sperl' and the 'Zeisig', at 'Dommayers' and 'Unger', and at the 'Straussl' and 'Schwenders'.

    Little wonder, therefore, that Strauss should have awarded pride of place to the melody of Ja, so singt man in his orchestral waltz Tausend und eine Nacht; indeed, this number provides the music for the entire first waltz section, including the Trio. Waltz 2 comprises material exclusively from the waltz section in the Act 2 (No. 16) Bacchanal, Lasst frei nun erschallen das Lied aus der Brust, sung by Fantasca with the chorus of bayadere. Waltz 3A also owes its origins to the Act 2 Bacchanal, to the second waltz tune Die Freiheit lacht für diese Nacht, whilst the final waltz section (3B) is to be found with the text Esel, nur Esel, nur Eseltreiber All' in Act 1 (No. 3), sung by Alibaba, the donkey-driver, and chorus.

  • Johann Strauss II - Vienna Blood Waltz

    7:07

    On 20 April 1873, the Archduchess Gisela Louise Maria (1856-1932), eldest daughter of the Austrian Emperor Franz Josef and the Empress Elisabeth, married Prince Leopold of Bavaria (1846-1930) in Vienna. To commemorate this major occasion a series of glittering festivities was arranged around the date of the Imperial wedding, including a Court Ball in the Hofburg Palace and a festival in the Prater, and the most important organisations of the nobility and citizenry, as well as the authorities of the City of Vienna itself, vied with each other in the organising of numerous celebrations and festive events.

    For their part, the personnel of the Wiener Hof-Operntheater (Vienna Court Opera Theatre) devised a very special attraction and announced for 22 April 1873 a Court Opera Ball - a forerunner of the present-day Vienna Opera Ball - the proceeds from which were destined for the theatre's Pensions Institute, which arranged the event. However, since at this time the Austrian Emperor was unprepared to sanction dancing in the Hof-Operntheater, which he looked upon as 'his' opera house, the event was instead held in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein building - home of the Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Society of the Friends of Music) and today the setting for the annual New Year's Day Concerts of the Vienna Philharmonic. As hosts of the Court Opera Ball, the artistes of the Hof-Operntheater were keen to present themselves as favourably as possible to their public, and so offered their guests a particularly beguiling programme. They engaged the Strauss Orchestra and its conductor, 'Court Ball Music Director' Eduard Strauss, to provide the music for dancing, but withheld their pièce de résistance until around midnight, when a break in proceedings of one hour¡¦s duration was announced for the benefit of both orchestra and dancers.

    Now the highlight of the evening was revealed as the resident orchestra of the Vienna Court Opera, the Vienna Philharmonic, presented a short concert of music. Since the Director of the Wiener Philharmoniker, Johann Herbeck, had been taken ill shortly before the ball, the first item - Carl Maria von Weber's Aufforderung zum Tanz (Invitation to the Dance), in Hector Berlioz's orchestration - was conducted by Otto Dessoff, who at that time was also leader of the Philharmonic Concerts. The critic of the Fremden-Blatt (24.04.1873) observed of this performance that it was played with such verve and precision that perhaps nobody will be able to recall having heard this piece of music better [played]. The journalist continued: After this, Johann Strauss stepped up to the conductor's podium to perform his latest waltz, 'Wiener Blut'. We do not believe that we are overstating our praise if we count this work amongst the best by the beloved Waltz King. This dance piece is a collection of genuine Viennese tunes, full of melody and electrifying rhythm. On tempestuous demand the waltz had to be repeated. The reviewer for the Neues Wiener Tagblatt (23.04.1873) was equally enthusiastic, numbering the waltz Wiener Blut amongst the most beautiful which Strauss has written in recent years. In these three-four bars, sometimes cheeky, sometimes sentimental, flows fresh, free and red Viennese blood.

    This performance of the waltz Wiener Blut, on the night of 22/23 April 1873, marked the first occasion on which the Viennese Waltz King conducted the renowned Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, and thus also the commencement of the orchestra's 'Strauss tradition'. (Some six months later, on 4 November 1873, the Wiener Philharmoniker would cement this relationship still further when, under the composer's direction, they performed Strauss's waltz An der schönen blauen Donau for the very first time at a concert in the Golden Hall of the Musikverein, hosted by the Committee of the Chinese World Exhibition.)

  • Johann Strauss II - Frühlingsstimmen Waltz, Op. 410 Voices of Spring

    8:37

    Zygmunt Nitkiewicz - conductor
    Symphony Orchestra of The Józef Marcin Żebrowski Music School in Częstochowa, Poland
    La Folle Journée de Varsovie
    recorded at Polish National Opera House in Warsaw, september 27, 2016

  • Johann Strauss II - Roses from the South Waltz

    8:50

    It was an eventful evening; the house was filled to the gables in order to hear a new work by our Strauss

    So wrote the Fremdenblatt newspaper (3 October) in its review of the highly successful première of Johann Strauss's operetta Das Spitzentuch der Königin ('The Queen's Lace Handkerchief'), which opened at Vienna's Theater an der Wien on 1 October 1880. The composer himself, though delighted by the reception accorded his latest stage work, was unconvinced that it would enjoy a lasting success. But he had no such doubts about the magnificent orchestral waltz, Rosen aus dem Süden, which he had hurriedly assembled from themes in his operetta, and whose piano edition his publisher, Cranz, was able to advertise in the press (together with the first Spitzentuch potpourri) just four days after the theatrical première! The honour of conducting the first performance of Rosen aus dem Süden fell to Johann's brother, Eduard, who was still on a concert tour of Germany when Spitzentuch received its première. Not until 7 November, therefore, at Eduard's Sunday afternoon concert in the Musikverein, did the waltz begin its triumphant conquest of the world, comprising, as it did, many of the musical highlights from the operetta. Two numbers which had drawn especial praise from the Spitzentuch first-night reviewers were the King's Act 1 Trüffel-Couplet (Stets kommt mir wieder in den Sinn -- the refrain of which Strauss claimed he had rewritten twelve times!) and Cervantes's Act 2 Romance, Wo die wilde Rose erblüht, and these both appear in Rosen aus dem Süden, as Waltz 1 and Waltz 2A respectively.

  • Johann Strauss II - An der schönen, blauen Donau - Walzer, Op. 314

    9:40

    It is interesting to reflect that Johann Strauss II's An der schönen blauen Donau (By the beautiful blue Danube), the most famous of all orchestral waltzes, was conceived and first performed as a showpiece for male voice choir. The work was Johann's first choral waltz, written as a commission for the Wiener Mannergesang-Verein (Vienna Men's Choral Association) with whom he was to enjoy a close association over the years, creating for the choir a total of six choral master waltzes, two polkas and a march.

    Strauss began sketching themes for the waltz, which would eventually bear the title An der schönen blauen Donau, in autumn 1866, and originally submitted to the Association a four-part unaccompanied chorus comprising just four waltz sections and a brief Coda, but without Introduction. A hastily written piano accompaniment followed soon afterwards, and then a fifth waltz section. The orchestral accompaniment, together with the distinctive Introduction, was provided only shortly before the first performance which took place at Vienna's Dianabad-Saal ballroom during the Association's Faschings-Liedertafel (Carnival Programme of Songs) on 15 February 1867. In the absence of the composer, who was appearing with the Strauss Orchestra at the Imperial Court on the night of the première, the members of the Wiener Männergesang-Verein were conducted by their chorus-master, Rudolf Weinwurm, and accompanied by the orchestra of the 'Georg V, König von Hannover' Infantry Regiment No. 42, which was temporarily stationed in Vienna. The original, satirical, text had been furnished by the Association's own 'house poet', Josef Weyl (1821-95), although a new text was added in 1890 by Franz von Gernerth (1821-1900) which was more suited to non-carnival occasions and commenced with the now familiar words: Donau so blau ... (Danube so blue...)

    The Viennese were treated to the first purely orchestral rendition of An der schönen blauen Donau - complete with Introduction and full-length Coda - on Sunday 10 March 1867 in the Volksgarten at the Strauss Orchestra's annual Carnival Revue, which took the form a Benefit Concert by Josef and Eduard Strauss, with the participation of Johann Strauss, Imperial-Royal Court Ball Music Director. This date is further confirmed by an entry in Josef Strauss's diary. Johann himself conducted this performance of his waltz, which featured as the third item on a programme presenting no less than twenty-four novelties composed for that year's carnival celebrations by the three Strauss brothers. Perhaps surprisingly, in view of the unanimous praise lavished by the Viennese press upon the choral première of the work, the orchestral version of An der schönen blauen Donau did not attract special attention from the critics, the Neues Fremden-Blatt (11.03.1867) merely noting that every piece met with the most undivided applause, which now and then increased to tempestuous enthusiasm, and everything had to be repeated. The three brothers celebrated in this concert the greatest triumph in the sphere of Viennese dance music.

    During the 1867 Carnival, An der schönen blauen Donau was merely regarded as a pearl amongst many others, and only a little later did the unique position which it was to assume, and maintain, as the unofficial national anthem of both Vienna and Austria, become evident. The new waltz was in the composer's luggage which he took with him to Paris in summer 1867, where it was played on 28 May at the glittering Austrian Embassy Ball given by the Ambassador, Prince Richard Metternich, and his wife, Princess Pauline, benefiting considerably from an attendance by the élite of international society. An Englishwoman who was present at this event, Mrs Charles Moulton (later Madame de Hegermann-Lindencrone), wrote home enthusiastically the following day: The famous Johann Strauss, brought from Vienna especially for this occasion, stood waiting with uplifted baton and struck up the 'Blue Danube', heard for the first time in Paris... And how Strauss played it!... With what fire and 'entrain'!. It did not take long for the reputation of the work to spread much further afield, and on 1 July 1867 Theodore Thomas conducted its first American performance in New York with his own orchestra, an ensemble which later became the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. A little less than twelve weeks later, on 21 September 1867, the composer conducted the British première of the work (in a choral version with a 100-strong male voice choir) at London's Royal Italian Opera House, Covent Garden, afterwards noting in his diary: tremendous tumult and rejoicing!!!.

    Conductor: Franz Welser-Most
    Orchestra: London Philarmonic Orchestra

  • Johann Strauss II. - Geschichten aus dem Wiener Wald

    7:39



    This is my personal favourite orchestral version of this terrific masterpiece. Played by Vienna Symphony Orchestra, Conductor: Robert Stolz (!)

    Robert Stolz himself is known as the last composer of the classical viennese aera. He was the one who knew best how a Strauss waltz has to be arranged and how the orchestra has to play it. That's why I adore this recording so much! It's 100% authentic and even the Vienna Philharmonics won't do it better.

    I had to shorten the track coz it was longer than 10 minutes. The intro has been removed. But never mind, the zither theme of the intro is played again at the end of the waltz.

    ___________________

    Tales from the Vienna woods
    ウィーンの森の物語
    小约翰·施特劳斯
    योहान स्ट्रॉस दुसरा
    ヨハン・シュトラウス2世

  • Radetzky March - Johann Strauss Sr

    3:01

    Radetzky March - Johann Strauss Sr

  • Johann Strauss - Overture Die Fledermaus

    8:58

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Overture Die Fledermaus

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Johann Strauss II - Dunarea Albastra

    7:03

    :x

  • Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka - Johann Strauss II

    2:39

    Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka, Polka schnell Op. 214 von Johann Strauss II (1825 - 1899)

  • Vienna New Years Concert 2010, Die Fledermaus Overture, Johann Strauss

    9:20

    From the New Years Day concert 2010 in Vienna. Johann Strauss' Die Fledermaus Overture. Upscaled to 720p.

    Recorded from the BBC on 01 January 2010.

  • Johann Strauss II - Pizzicato Polka

    2:48

    The second of the Strauss brothers, Josef (1827-70), had been the first to tread the path of matrimony. Though very happily married since 1857, Josef constantly strove to become financially independent so he could break free from the oppressive confines of the Strauss family apartments in the massive 'Hirschenhaus' in Leopoldstadt and establish a home of his own with his wife and daughter. This possibility appeared to him to advance a step closer when, in 1868, brother Johann reached agreement with the management of the St Petersburg Tsarskoye-Selo Railway Company for Josef and himself to share the conducting of concerts at Pavlovsk during the summer months of 1869.

    The two Strauss brothers were accompanied on their 1869 venture to Russia by Johann's wife, Jetty (1818-78), whose letters home show that the underlying disharmony which had long existed between 'Jean' (Johann) and 'Pepi' (Josef) had largely given way to a spirit of mutual co-operation. As the two musical directors were now able to divide the workload of rehearsing and conducting the orchestra, both had sufficient time to compose. On 13 June 1869 (= 1 June, Russian calendar), Jetty wrote from Pavlovsk to Josef¡¦s wife Caroline (1831-1900) in Vienna: Pepi & Jean are now writing a polka together - that again will be something new. Almost twenty-three years later, on 1 April 1892, Johann detailed in a letter to his publisher Fritz Simrock the events which had culminated in this fraternal collaboration: I advised my brother Josef - so that he could secure the St Petersburg engagement (I have been there 10 times and earned a lot of money) [-] to compose something which would catch on in St Petersburg, and suggested he should prepare a pizzicato polka. He did not want to do it - he was always indecisive - finally I proposed to him that the polka should be created by the two of us. He agreed, and just look - the polka caused a furore in the true sense of the word.

    Johann Strauss was not exaggerating. The records kept by the diarist F.A. Zimmermann, a viola-player in the 47-strong orchestra at Pavlovsk, show clearly that the work was played no less than nine times on the evening it was first introduced to the Russian public - 24 June 1869 (= 12 June). One can only guess at the scenes which must have ensued as the public demonstrated its wild enthusiasm for this novelty item which, according to Johann, was the very first of its kind. (Léo Delibes's famous Pizzicato-Polka for his ballet Sylvia, ou La Nymphe de Diane was not heard until 1876.) In view of the work's success, it is strange that Johann and Josef omitted the Pizzicato-Polka from their next eleven concerts and only reintroduced it at their benefit performance on 6 July 1869 (= 24 June), when the piece had to be played a total of seven times. At subsequent performances during the remainder of the Pavlovsk season, the Pizzicato-Polka continued to exert its extraordinary effect upon the public.

    Outside the lands of the Tsar, the Pizzicato-Polka began its conquest of the world when Josef Strauss conducted its Viennese première on 14 November 1869 during the first of his promenade concerts that season with the Strauss Orchestra at the Sofienbad-Saal. In addition to the Pizzicato-Polka - which was given by a quartet of players - Josef also introduced the first Viennese performances of three other works written by him for that year's Pavlovsk concerts: Ohne Sorgen! Polka schnell op. 271, Frohes Leben, Walzer op. 272 and En passant, Polka française op. 273.

  • 3 Hours The Blue Danube Johann Strauss - Healing Relaxing Sleeping Nature Sounds

    3:00

    3 Hours The Blue Danube Johann Strauss
    Sounds of nature can help you heal ,relax , sleep and meditate.

    We hope you like this sound and may it serve you well!
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    ▶3 Hours Thunder and Rain Sounds


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    ▶Playlist :classical music and nature sounds

  • Johann Strauss II - Egyptian March, Op. 335 conducted by Maciej Tomasiewicz

    5:01

    Special Winners Concert of 3rd Polish Nationwide Music Schools' Symphonic Orchestras Competition
    Audition Award - Polish Youth Symphony Orchestra in Bytom, Maciej Tomasiewicz - conductor
    Zdobywca nagrody publiczności - Polska Młodzieżowa Orkiestra Symfoniczna –
    Orkiestra Ogólnokształcącej Szkoły Muzycznej I i II stopnia im. Fryderyka Chopina w Bytomiu,
    pod dyrekcją Macieja Tomasiewicza

  • Frühlingsstimmen op. 410 - Johann Strauss II

    5:48

    Frühlingsstimmen, walzer op. 410 (Voices of Spring). Author: Johann Strauss II (1825-1899).

  • Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra - Dunărea Albastră

    9:59

    Moment din Concertul de Anul Nou, Viena 2011, transmis de TVR1 şi TVR HD.

    Dirijor: Franz Welser-Möst





  • Patricia JANEČKOVÁ: Mein Herr Marquis

    3:42

    Johann Strauss II: Mein Herr Marquis (Die Fledermaus)
    Soprano: Patricia JANEČKOVÁ - New Years Concert in Vienna Style“

    Janáček Philharmonic Ostrava, Chief conductor: Heiko Mathias Förster
    January 7, 2016, Ostrava, Czech Republic

  • André Rieu - Strauss & Co

    3:38

    André Rieu & His Johann Strauss Orchestra performing Strauss & Co live in Maastricht. From the DVD A Midsummer Night's Dream. For tour dates and tickets visit:

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  • Kaiser-Walzer - Johann Strauss

    10:54

    Herbert von Karajan

  • Johann Strauss II - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka Op.214

    2:38

    Johann Strauss (en aleman: Johann Strauß (Sohn)) (Viena, 25 de octubre de 1825 - 3 de junio de 1899) compositor austriaco, hijo de Johann Strauss y hermano de Josef y Eduard, todos ellos compositores también, aunque no alcanzaron la fama de Johann al que se le conocía en Viena como el rey del Vals, debiéndose en gran parte a sus composiciones la popularidad de la que gozó este género musical en la Viena del siglo XIX.

    Johann nació en Viena, y aunque su padre no deseaba que su hijo se dedicara a la música, estudió secretamente violín. Cuando su padre abandonó a la familia, contando Johann 17 años, pudo éste dedicarse plenamente a su carrera como compositor. A los 19 años realizó su primera aparición en público dirigiendo su propia orquesta. A la muerte de su padre unió su grupo a la orquesta que su padre había lanzado a la fama. En sus múltiples giras por Europa y en 1876 por Estados Unidos interpretó sus propias composiciones y en especial sus valses. Entre los más famosos se encuentran El Danubio azul (1867), Cuentos de los bosques de Viena (1868), Rosas del sur (1878) y Voces de primavera (1881). Entre 1871 y 1897 compuso 16 operetas para los teatros de Viena, entre las que destacan Die Fledermaus (El murciélago, 1874) y Der Zigeunerbaron (El barón gitano, 1885).

    Sus composiciones le granjearon la admiración de eminentes compositores coetáneos, incluyendo a Johannes Brahms al que le unía una amistad personal. Falleció de neumonía en su ciudad natal a la edad de 73 años.

  • Johann Strauss - Wiener Blut, Waltz

    9:06

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Wiener Blut, Waltz

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

  • Einzugsmarsch from Johann Strauss, Jr. ♪ ♫ ♪ ♫♪ ♫ ♪ ♫♪ ♫ ♪

    3:27

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Conductor Zubin Mehta from Heldenplatz, Vienna.

  • Vozes da Primavera-valsa de Johann Strauss Jr. - wmv

    7:36

    Lindas imagens da primavera em flor- web- montagem de vídeo Stela Soares

  • Johann Strauss - Wine,woman & song long version

    9:18

  • Voces de Primavera - Johann Strauss

    4:58

    Johann Strauss (1825-1899) Compositor austriaco, hijo de Johann Strauss y hermano de Josef y Eduard, todos ellos compositores también, aunque no alcanzaron la fama de Johann al que se le conocía en Viena como el Rey del Vals, debiéndose en gran parte a sus composiciones, la popularidad de la que gozó este género musical en la Viena del siglo XIX.

    Aunque su padre no deseaba que su hijo se dedicara a la música, estudió secretamente violín. Cuando su padre abandonó a la familia, contando Johann 17 años, pudo éste dedicarse plenamente a su carrera como compositor. A los 19 años realizó su primera aparición en público dirigiendo su propia orquesta. A la muerte de su padre unió su grupo a la orquesta que su padre había lanzado a la fama. En sus múltiples giras por Europa y en 1876 por Estados Unidos interpretó sus propias composiciones y en especial sus valses. Entre los más famosos se encuentran El Danubio azul (1867) Cuentos de los bosques de Viena (1868) Rosas del sur (1878) y Voces de primavera (1881). Entre 1871 y 1897 compuso 16 operetas para los teatros de Viena, entre las que destacan Die Fledermaus (El murciélago, 1874) y Der Zigeunerbaron (El barón gitano, 1885).

    Johann Strauss padre, quien con su amigo Josef Lanner dio al vals su forma actual, se opuso con fuerza a la ambición de su hijo de convertirse en músico también. Para él las únicas profesiones posibles eran las típicamente burguesas. Sin embargo, su madre Anna reconoció el genio de su hijo y le apoyó, lo que él se lo agradeció toda su vida.

    El 15 de octubre de 1844 entró en la historia de la música, ese fue el día en que Johann Strauss hijo entró por primera vez, sin el consentimiento de su padre, en el Casino Dommayer de Hietzing con orquesta y composiciones propias. El público del local, que estaba lleno a reventar, se entusiasmó rápidamente con Johann Strauss junior, y pedían escuchar siempre una canción más. Hasta diecinueve veces tuvo que repetir algunas piezas.

    El debut del joven Strauss fue un éxito arrollador y la prensa escribió:
    ¡Buenas noches, Lanner! ¡Buenas noches Strauss padre! ¡Buenos días, Strauss hijo!

    El mundo entero en éxtasis con el vals, el nuevo baile y las fascinantes melodías del vals conquistan el mundo entero. Gracias a sus numerosos viajes y contratas, Johann Strauss y sus hermanos popularizaron el vals en todo el mundo, y un verdadero torbellino valsístico se apoderó de la gente más allá de las fronteras de Europa. En el verano de 1856, Strauss fue invitado por primera vez a Rusia para dirigir conciertos y bailes en el famoso Vauxhall-Pavillon del palacio Pawlowsk. Su éxito y popularidad alcanzaron cotas tan altas, que hasta 1865, es decir, durante diez años, pasó cada verano en el palacio Pawlowsk en su papel de celebridad aclamada.

    Los ingresos generados gracias a ello fueron la base del enorme patrimonio que acumularía más tarde.

    En 1872, en ocasión del Jubileo Internacional por la Paz, fue invitado a Boston, en los EEUU, donde su actuación fue espectacular. Delante de un público de 100.000 personas dirigió, con la ayuda de 100 subdirectores, una orquesta de 20.000 músicos.

    Sus composiciones le granjearon la admiración de eminentes compositores coetáneos, incluyendo a Johannes Brahms al que le unía una amistad personal. Falleció de neumonía en su ciudad natal a la edad de 73 años.

    Poema a la Primavera:

    Ya viene la primavera.
    lo ha dicho la estrella

    La primavera sin mancha.
    lo ha dicho el agua

    Sin mancha y viva de gloria
    lo ha dicho la rosa

    De gloria, altura y pasión
    lo ha dicho tu voz

    Juan Ramón Jiménez

  • Johann Strauss - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka

    3:31

    From the Heldenplatz in Vienna, 29. May 1999

    Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker)
    Zubin Mehta - conductor

    Johann Strauss II - Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka

    Watch the complete concert:

    Johann Strauss II (October 25, 1825 – June 3, 1899), also known as Johann Strauss, Jr., the Younger, the Son (German: Sohn), Johann Baptist Strauss, was an Austrian composer of light music, particularly dance music and operettas. He composed over 500 waltzes, polkas, quadrilles, and other types of dance music, as well as several operettas and a ballet. In his lifetime, he was known as The Waltz King, and was largely then responsible for the popularity of the waltz in Vienna during the 19th century.
    Some of Johann Strauss' most famous works include The Blue Danube, Kaiser-Walzer, Tales from the Vienna Woods, and the Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka. Among his operettas, Die Fledermaus and Der Zigeunerbaron are the best known.

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