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Playlist of Jim Pepper

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  • Jim Pepper Witchitai-to

    8:10

    Jim Pepper Witchitai-to from the 1971 Embryo records release Pepper's Pow Wow

  • x
  • Jim Pepper - Witchi Tia To

    8:20

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • x
  • Witchi-Tai-To by Jim Pepper

    2:56

    Here is the great song by Jim Pepper!

  • Amina Claudine Myers Quartet feat. Jim Pepper - Witchi Tai To

    12:24

    May 19, 1991
    Jazzfest in Raab
    Raab, Austria

    Amina Claudine Myers - piano, vocals
    Jim Pepper - tenor sax, vocals
    Anthony Cox - bass
    Leopoldo Flemming - percussion

  • x
  • Witchi Tai To

    12:22

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    Witchi Tai To (Live) · Jim Pepper, Amina Claudine Myers, Anthony Cox, Leopoldo Fleming

    Afro Indian Blues (Live)

    ℗ PAO Records

    Released on: 2006-02-09

    Author: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Jim Pepper Polar Bear Stomp

    7:42

  • x
  • witchi tai to w / lyrics

    5:52

    Jim Pepper compuso Witchi tai to basándose en la letra de una canción peyote que cantaba su abuelo. Pepper fue un saxofonista de jazz descendiente de nativos americanos Kaw y Creek. Yo traduje al castellano el estribillo, respetando su sentido, para que pueda ser cantada de acuerdo a la métrica de la melodía.

  • Jim Pepper - Remembering the Flying Eagle

    17:40

    Jim Pepper in concert at Raab, Austria, with the Amina Claudine Myers Trio in 1991, performing Remembrance - Yon Na Ho - Witchi Tai To. You must not forget me when I'm long gone, for I loved you so dearly, sugar honey....

  • 19800726 Don Cherry French Magic Circus at Antibes

    1:18:43

    In 1980 we did a European tour with a slightly big group plus actor/dancer/magician. This is from Antibes on July 26, 1980. In the group: Jim Pepper, Jane, David and Eagle-Eye Cherry, Frank Serafino, Riky Busch, Bengt Berger, Rafael Cruz and Don Cherry plus magician Abdul LaFraise and mask dancer Binoche. Its not one of the best concerts from the tour but still interesting and as it is Don's birthday today, why not?

  • x
  • Jim Pepper Eagle Tone

    10:41

    Jim Pepper was the Flying Eagle, and he had a tone admired by many. Joe Lovano described it as his Eagle Tone. In this live recording, Jim performs his composition Funny Glasses and a Moustache with Mal Waldron, John Betsch and Ed Schuller.

  • Jim Pepper Story Part 1

    8:20

    A TV story on saxophonist Jim Pepper. First aired 5-31-07. Producer: Jack Berry Camera/Editor: Greg Bond

  • Jim Pepper-Newly-Weds Song

    3:01

    Track 8 from the Pepper's Pow Wow Album

  • Jim Pepper - Goin Down to Muskogee

    5:57

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper - Funny Glasses live 1989 - Mal Waldron

    13:53

    Jim Pepper's music will live forever, and not just his Indian songs. Here he performs live with the Mal Waldron Quartet at the Utopia Club, Innsbruck in 1989, recorded on Tutu Records.

  • Dakota Song

    4:32

    Provided to YouTube by Kontor New Media

    Dakota Song · Jim Pepper

    Dakota Song

    ℗ enja records

    Released on: 2016-07-29

    Artist: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper
    Music Publisher: copyright control

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Amina Claudine Myers Quartet feat. Jim Pepper - Straight To You

    14:18

    May 19, 1991
    Jazzfest in Raab
    Raab, Austria

    Amina Claudine Myers - piano, vocals
    Jim Pepper - tenor sax, vocals
    Anthony Cox - bass
    Leopoldo Flemming - percussion

  • Bamasso

    7:02

    Provided to YouTube by Kontor New Media

    Bamasso · Jim Pepper

    The Path

    ℗ Enja Records Horst Weber GmbH

    Released on: 2007-06-18

    Artist: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper
    Lyricist: Jim Pepper

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Jim Pepper - Water

    5:45

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper - Malinyea

    4:14

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper Story Part 2

    9:25

    Part 2 of a TV piece on saxophonist Jim Pepper. Producer: Jack Berry Camera/Editor: Greg Bond

  • x
  • African Blues

    11:23

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    African Blues (Live) · Jim Pepper, Amina Claudine Myers, Anthony Cox, Leopoldo Fleming

    Afro Indian Blues (Live)

    ℗ PAO Records

    Released on: 2006-02-09

    Author: Amina Claudine Myers
    Composer: Amina Claudine Myers

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Comin and Goin

    12:29

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    Comin and Goin (Live) · Jim Pepper, Amina Claudine Myers, Anthony Cox, Leopoldo Fleming

    Afro Indian Blues (Live)

    ℗ PAO Records

    Released on: 2006-02-09

    Author: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Custer Gets It Jim Pepper 1967

    15:00

    Custer Gets It -- Jim Pepper wrote his free-jazz interpretation of the Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Battle of the Greasy Grass) in 1967. This is the only known full-length recording of Custer Gets It, recorded in 1967 in NYC by Ra Kalam Bob Moses.

    This performance lasts about as long as the battle itself and features Jim Pepper, Bob Moses, Dave Liebman, Mike Nock, Bert Wilson and Warren Gales....

  • The Blues

    14:19

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    The Blues (Live) · Jim Pepper, Amina Claudine Myers, Anthony Cox, Leopoldo Fleming

    Afro Indian Blues (Live)

    ℗ PAO Records

    Released on: 2006-02-09

    Author: Traditional
    Composer: Traditional

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Remembering Jim Pepper

    15:48

    JB Butler and Luciana Proano reminisce about Jim Pepper

  • Jim Pepper - Square Song

    5:28

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Naima/Rainbeaux -Everything is Everything feat. Chris Hills, Jim Pepper & Chip Baker 1969

    5:11

  • Jim Pepper ◦ Witchi-Tai-To – audio

    2:56

    Jim Pepper (1941–1992) was a Kaw-Muscogee Native American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer. Pepper hailed from Portland, Oregon and is credited as one of the first musicians to combine elements of jazz and rock.

  • Jim Pepper - Lakota Song

    4:29

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper - Comin and Going

    4:46

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Mal Waldron Quartet - Never In a Hurry

    15:40

    Album : VOL One Quadrologue At Utopia (1990)

    Mal Waldron : Piano
    Jim Pepper : Tenor Saxophone
    Ed Schuller : Bass
    John Betsch : Drums

  • Ruby My Dear Mal Waldron & Jim Pepper

    6:50

    Standard tune by Thelonius Monk from Mal Waldron & Jim Pepper album Art Of Duo (1988)

  • JIM PEPPER Yan a ho

    4:23

  • Legacy of the Flying Eagle Jim Pepper

    3:51

    Jim Pepper (Kaw/Muskogee Creek)(1941-1992) performing Legacy of the Flying Eagle at the International Jazz Festival in Raab, Austria, with the Amina Claudine Meyers Trio, 1991.

  • Winona LaDuke - Sean Cruz on KBOO 90.7 FM About Jim Pepper, pt 1.wmv

    15:16

    Winona LaDuke and Sean Cruz had a lengthy impromptu conversation in Portland at KBOO 90.7 FM that was captured by KBOO engineer Liam Delta in May, 2010. The subjects ranged from the new White Earth radio station that Winona is building (they are looking for engineering help right now--call them if you can help), to the Heavy Haul tar sands project she is opposing, to the great Native American musician Jim Pepper. The entire conversation will be posted in segments, and will be continued....

  • JIM PEPPER Goin Down to Muskogee

    2:39

  • Jim Peppers Powwow 1985 Willisau Set 2

    1:10:07

    Jim Pepper's Powwow performed at the Willisau Jazz Festival in Switzerland in 1985. This is the second of two sets.

  • Jim Pepper - Ya Na Ho

    5:06

  • Jim Pepper Ya Na Ho Vs Dandara Primeira Primavera

    3:50

    more Scheibosan Sound here

  • Caddo Revival

    4:40

    Provided to YouTube by Kontor New Media

    Caddo Revival · Jim Pepper

    The Path

    ℗ Enja Records Horst Weber GmbH

    Released on: 2007-06-18

    Artist: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper
    Lyricist: Jim Pepper

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Jim Pepper-Senecas

    5:49

    Track 4 from the Pepper's Pow Wow Album

  • The Legend of Jim Pepper

    9:51

    Provided to YouTube by CDBaby

    The Legend of Jim Pepper · Lynn Darroch

    Local Heroes/American Originals

    ℗ 2009 Lynn Darroch

    Released on: 2009-01-01

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Jim Pepper - Halleleu

    4:01

    Caren Knight - Vocal
    Jim Pepper - Tenor Saxophone
    Jimmy Creeper Smith - Hammond Organ
    Ron Schwerin - Percussion


    Frank Kulaga - Audio Engineer

    Produced By David Ackerman for Good Friends

  • Jim Pepper - Custer Gets it

    3:07

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Legacy of the Flying Eagle - Jim Pepper

    3:50

    Jim Pepper (Kaw/Creek)(1941-1992) performed Legacy of the Flying Eagle at Raab, Austria in 1991 with the Amina Claudine Myers Trio.
    You must not forget me when I'm long gone, for I loved you so dearly, sugar honey....

    Remembrance - 4 Directions - Yon Na Ho - Witchi Tai To

  • Jim Pepper-Yon A Ho

    5:42

    Track 5 from the Pepper's Pow Wow Album

  • JIM PEPPER Newly weds song

    2:25

  • JIM PEPPER,YAN-A.HO, FAST by MARI

    3:53

  • The Jim Pepper Quartet at JSO, circa 1980s

    6:46

    The Jim Pepper Quartet performed at the Jazz Society of Oregon picnic, circa 1980s.

  • Jim Pepper: Goin Down to Muskogee

    5:54

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

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