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Playlist of Jim Pepper

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  • Jim Pepper - Witchi Tia To

    8:20

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper Witchitai-to

    8:10

    Jim Pepper Witchitai-to from the 1971 Embryo records release Pepper's Pow Wow

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  • Amina Claudine Myers Quartet feat. Jim Pepper - Witchi Tai To

    12:24

    May 19, 1991
    Jazzfest in Raab
    Raab, Austria

    Amina Claudine Myers - piano, vocals
    Jim Pepper - tenor sax, vocals
    Anthony Cox - bass
    Leopoldo Flemming - percussion

  • Witchi Tai To

    12:22

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    Witchi Tai To (Live) · Jim Pepper, Amina Claudine Myers, Anthony Cox, Leopoldo Fleming

    Afro Indian Blues (Live)

    ℗ PAO Records

    Released on: 2006-02-09

    Author: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • x
  • Witchi-Tai-To by Jim Pepper

    2:56

    Here is the great song by Jim Pepper!

  • Jim Pepper - Witchi Tia To // JazzONLYJazz

    5:20

  • x
  • Jim Pepper: Witchi-Tai-To

    8:24

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

  • Dakota Song

    4:32

    Provided to YouTube by Kontor New Media

    Dakota Song · Jim Pepper

    Dakota Song

    ℗ enja records

    Released on: 2016-07-29

    Artist: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper
    Music Publisher: copyright control

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Jim Pepper -Squaw Song

    3:15

    Jim Pepper (1941-1992) from 1971 album Pepper's Pow Wow.

  • x
  • Jim Pepper Ya Na Ho Vs Dandara Primeira Primavera

    3:50

    more Scheibosan Sound here

  • Water Spirit: A tribute to Jim Pepper trailer

    1:01

    Portland Jazz Composers Ensemble's Water Spirit: A tribute to Jim Pepper is Saturday, May 18th, 2019 at The Old Church in Portland. Tickets available at pjce.org!

  • Jim Pepper: Comin and Goin

    4:44

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

  • Jim Pepper Story Part 1

    8:20

    A TV story on saxophonist Jim Pepper. First aired 5-31-07. Producer: Jack Berry Camera/Editor: Greg Bond

  • Prelude and Anthem for Jim Pepper

    21:15

    Music dedicated to Jim Pepper by Gordon Lee, one Pepper's longtime collaborators. This piece was commissioned by Portland Jazz Composers Ensemble for its Water Spirit: A tribute to Jim Pepper program, and premiered May 18th, 2019 at The Old Church in Portland, OR. Featuring 2 8 Tha Native (Fish Martinez) dancing, and Gordon Lee on piano with:

    Portland Jazz Composers Ensemble
    Nicole McCabe , soprano sax, clarinet | John Savage, alto sax, flute | Ian Christensen, tenor sax, clarinet | Mieke Bruggeman, bari sax, bass clarinet | Douglas Detrick & Noah Simpson, trumpet, flugelhorn | Stan Bock & Lars Campbell, trombone | Ryan Meagher, guitar | Gordon Lee & Clay Giberson, piano & keyboards | Dave Captein, bass | Ken Ollis, drums. Guest Artist 2 8 Tha Native, dance.

  • Jim Pepper: Ya Na Ho

    3:03

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

  • Jim Pepper - Remembering the Flying Eagle

    17:40

    Jim Pepper in concert at Raab, Austria, with the Amina Claudine Myers Trio in 1991, performing Remembrance - Yon Na Ho - Witchi Tai To. You must not forget me when I'm long gone, for I loved you so dearly, sugar honey....

  • Jim Pepper - Halleleu

    4:01

    Caren Knight - Vocal
    Jim Pepper - Tenor Saxophone
    Jimmy Creeper Smith - Hammond Organ
    Ron Schwerin - Percussion


    Frank Kulaga - Audio Engineer

    Produced By David Ackerman for Good Friends

  • Jim Pepper - Ya Na Ho

    3:06

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper - Malinyea

    4:14

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Mal Waldron, Jim Pepper ‎– Art Of The Duo

    1:11:02

    Jim Pepper - tenor, soprano saxophone
    Mal Waldron - piano

    1 Ticket To Tokyo - (Mal Waldron) - 00:00
    2 Ruby My Dear - (Thelonious Monk) - 04:52
    3 Bathing Beauties - (Jim Pepper) - 11:42
    4 Somewhere Over The Rainbow (Take One) - (H. Arlen, E.Y. Harburg) - 18:04
    5 Somewhere Over The Rainbow (Take Two) - (H. Arlen, E.Y. Harburg) - 20:33
    6 Spinning At Trixi - (Mal Waldron) - 24:01
    7 Good Bait - (C. Basie, T. Dameron) - 30:39
    8 You're No Bunny Unless Some Bunny Loves You - (Mal Waldron, Jim Pepper) - 37:38
    9 A Pepper Poem (Part One) - (Jim Pepper) - 41:54
    10 A Pepper Poem (Part Two) -(Jim Pepper) - 44:02
    11 Willy's Blues - (Jim Pepper) - 46:13
    12 What Is This Thing Called Love - (Cole Porter) - 51:02
    13 How Long Has This Been Going On - (G. & I. Gershwin) - 57:02
    14 Indian Water - (Jim Pepper) - 1:03:39


    Recorded on April 5, 1988 at Trixi Studios, Munich, Germany.
    Tutu Records - 1989.

  • x
  • Jim Pepper ◦ Witchi-Tai-To – audio

    2:56

    Jim Pepper (1941–1992) was a Kaw-Muscogee Native American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer. Pepper hailed from Portland, Oregon and is credited as one of the first musicians to combine elements of jazz and rock.

  • Remembering Jim Pepper: Pete DePoe

    6:40

    Redbone drummer Pete DePoe (1969 - 1972) remembers Jim Pepper in Portland, Oregon, September 2016.

    A 1000 Nations production.

  • Witchi - Tai - To ... by Jim Pepper

    3:00

  • Comin and Goin

    12:29

    Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

    Comin and Goin (Live) · Jim Pepper, Amina Claudine Myers, Anthony Cox, Leopoldo Fleming

    Afro Indian Blues (Live)

    ℗ PAO Records

    Released on: 2006-02-09

    Author: Jim Pepper
    Composer: Jim Pepper

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Jim Pepper-Yon A Ho

    5:42

    Track 5 from the Pepper's Pow Wow Album

  • Legacy of the Flying Eagle Jim Pepper

    3:51

    Jim Pepper (Kaw/Muskogee Creek)(1941-1992) performing Legacy of the Flying Eagle at the International Jazz Festival in Raab, Austria, with the Amina Claudine Meyers Trio, 1991.

  • Custer Gets It Jim Pepper 1967

    15:00

    Custer Gets It -- Jim Pepper wrote his free-jazz interpretation of the Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Battle of the Greasy Grass) in 1967. This is the only known full-length recording of Custer Gets It, recorded in 1967 in NYC by Ra Kalam Bob Moses.

    This performance lasts about as long as the battle itself and features Jim Pepper, Bob Moses, Dave Liebman, Mike Nock, Bert Wilson and Warren Gales....

  • Legacy of the Flying Eagle - Jim Pepper

    3:50

    Jim Pepper (Kaw/Creek)(1941-1992) performed Legacy of the Flying Eagle at Raab, Austria in 1991 with the Amina Claudine Myers Trio.
    You must not forget me when I'm long gone, for I loved you so dearly, sugar honey....

    Remembrance - 4 Directions - Yon Na Ho - Witchi Tai To

  • In the Spirit of Flying Eagle Jim Pepper II, part 1 Witchi Tai To

    21:23

    The 2nd annual San Francisco tribute concert to Jim Pepper, In the Spirit of Flying Eagle II, took place at Yerba Buena Gardens on June 8, 2016. This video is the first of several parts.

  • Jim Pepper - Goin Down to Muskogee

    5:57

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper - Comin and Going

    4:46

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Amina Claudine Myers Quartet feat. Jim Pepper - Straight To You

    14:18

    May 19, 1991
    Jazzfest in Raab
    Raab, Austria

    Amina Claudine Myers - piano, vocals
    Jim Pepper - tenor sax, vocals
    Anthony Cox - bass
    Leopoldo Flemming - percussion

  • Jim Peppers Powwow 1985 Willisau Jazz Festival set 1

    49:02

    Jim Pepper's Powwow performed at the Willisau Jazz Festival in Switzerland in 1985. This is the first of two sets.

  • EVERYTHING IS EVERYTHING WITCHI TAI TO

    2:54

    THIS SONG DID MAKE THE CHARTS AROUND #70 ON U.S. BILLBOARD TOP 100. I RECALL THIS ONE DURING THE SUMMER 0F '69 LISTENING TO IT ON THE RADIO LATE AT NIGHT. A DEFINITE FAVE.

  • Jim Pepper - Water

    5:45

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper: Squaw Song

    5:26

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

  • Jim Pepper - Ya Na Ho

    5:06

  • The Jim Pepper Quartet at JSO, circa 1980s

    6:46

    The Jim Pepper Quartet performed at the Jazz Society of Oregon picnic, circa 1980s.

  • Remembering Jim Pepper

    15:48

    JB Butler and Luciana Proano reminisce about Jim Pepper

  • Jim Pepper: Malinyea

    4:18

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

  • Re: Witchi-Tai-To by Jim Pepper

    1:51

    Video Cam Direct Upload

  • Jim Pepper - Square Song

    5:28

    Jim Pepper was an American jazz saxophonist, composer, and singer of Native American ancestry.

    Beginning in the late 1960s, Pepper became a pioneer of fusion jazz, his band The Free Spirits (active between 1965 and 1968, with guitarist Larry Coryell) being credited as the first to combine elements of jazz and rock. His primary instrument was the tenor saxophone (he also played flute and soprano saxophone), and his characteristic incisive, penetrating tone and soulful delivery was unique for its time. A similar timbre was taken up by later players such as Jan Garbarek, Michael Brecker, and David Sanborn.

    Of Kaw and Creek heritage, Pepper also achieved notoriety for his compositions combining elements of jazz and Native American music. Don Cherry and Ornette Coleman encouraged Pepper to reflect his roots and heritage and incorporate it into his jazz playing and composition. His Witchi Tai To (derived from a peyote healing chant of the Native American Church which he had learned from his grandfather) is the most famous example of this hybrid style; the song has been covered by many other artists including Harper's Bizarre, Ralph Towner (with and without Oregon), Jan Garbarek, and Brewer & Shipley. Pepper supported the American Indian Movement. He served as musical director for Night of the First Americans, a Native American self-awareness benefit concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. in 1980 and played also on pow-wows.

    Pepper was a member of the short-lived band Everything Is Everything with Chris Hills, Lee Reinoehl, Chip Baker, John Waller and Jim Zitro. Their sole album spawned the near-hit single Witchi Tai To (which got lots of airplay). It was issued on Vanguard Apostolic and UK Vanguard in England.

    In his own projects, he recorded with Cherry, Naná Vasconcelos, Collin Walcott, Kenny Werner, John Scofield, Ed Schuller, Hamid Drake, and others. His CD Comin' and Goin' (1983) is the definitive statement of Pepper's unique American Indian jazz with nine songs played by four different line-ups. He worked also with the Liberation Music Orchestra, Paul Motian' s quintet, Bob Moses, Marty Cook, Mal Waldron, David Friesen, and Amina Claudine Myers, and toured Europe intensively.

    Pepper died in 1992, of lymphoma.

    (copied from wikipedia)

  • Jim Pepper: Lakota Song

    4:26

    Original Album: Comin' and Goin' (1983)

  • jim pepper habiba

    6:41

    Eu não possuo os direitos autorais dessa musica. Simplesmente adoro a musica e quero que meus amigos chegar a conhecer esse artista excepcional.

    JIM PEPPER
    THE PATH 1988


    enja CD 5087-2

    Jim Pepper ts
    Kirk Lightsey p
    Santi DeBriano b
    John Betsch dr

  • Ruby My Dear Mal Waldron & Jim Pepper

    6:50

    Standard tune by Thelonius Monk from Mal Waldron & Jim Pepper album Art Of Duo (1988)

  • Amina Claudine Myers Quartet feat. Jim Pepper - Coming And Going

    12:30

    May 19, 1991
    Jazzfest in Raab
    Raab, Austria

    Amina Claudine Myers - piano, vocals
    Jim Pepper - tenor sax, vocals
    Anthony Cox - bass
    Leopoldo Flemming - percussion

  • Witchi tai to , Jim Pepper

    1:42

    Jim Pepper in a different way, spontane homesession mit Cajon und Mandoline, 11 years old Robin on the drum

  • Jim Pepper ~ Witchitai-To

    6:33

    No intent to infringe on copyrights. if you think I have violated the rights of the artist, kindly notify me so I can take down this video. Meanwhile Enjoy! Support the artist, buy the album!

  • Jim Pepper-Drums

    4:25

    Track 10 from the Pepper's Pow Wow Album

  • Jim Pepper-Fast War Dance-Now War Dance

    2:24

    Track 9 from the Pepper's Pow Wow Album

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