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Playlist of Gulda and Zawinul concert

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    Gulda and Zawinul concert

    2:2:54

    Gulda and Zawinul in the Weiner Konzerthauses

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    Friedrich Gulda & Joe Zawinul...so blues!so groove! II

    7:53

    secondo blues tratto da un concerto del 1986 di due grandi musicisti viennesi:il sommo pianista classico Friedrich Gulda di cui non tutti conoscono le divagazioni nel jazz e nella free music ed il jazzista Joseph Zawinul.Il concerto inizia - come d'abitudine nei concerti di Gulda - con brani della tradizione classica viennese(Schubert - Beethoven);seguono composizioni jazz di Gulda e poi entra in scena Zawinul che suona solo e in duo: i due maestri improvvisando regalano musica non convenzionale e di indubbio interesse(anche con l'ausilio di effetti elettronici) in cui armonie jazz e free music si compenetrano...

    Alessandro Caruso

    consulenza tecnica: Alessandro Avitabile

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    Zawinul, Hancock & Gulda - Night And Day & Calypso For All

    16:11

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda, Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul - piano (six hands)

    Joe Zawinul, Herbie Hancock & Friedrich Gulda - Night And Day

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

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    Friedrich Gulda + Joe Zawinul - Volcano For Hire

    4:47

    Jazzfestival Vienna, Wr. Stadthalle, Austria
    4 July 1987

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    Zawinul, Hancock & Gulda - Improvisation

    12:01

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda & Herbie Hancock - piano
    Joe Zawinul - breath control synthesizer (Korg Pepe)

    Joe Zawinul & Herbie Hancock & Friedrich Gulda - Improvisation

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

    Joe Zawinul's rack of synthesizers in this concert:
    Sequential Circuits T8, Korg 707, Korg Pepe (breath control synthesizer), Korg M1, Korg DW 6000...
    Help us to find out the other synthesizers!

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    Zawinul, Hancock & Gulda - With Computer

    13:41

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda & Herbie Hancock & Joe Zawinul - piano with loop sequencer

    Joe Zawinul & Herbie Hancock & Friedrich Gulda - With Computer

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

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    Gulda and Joe Zawinul play together

    7:36

    Gulda and Zawinul play Zawinul's composition at Wiener Konzerthaus, 1986

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    Chick Corea, Friedrich Gulda and Nicolas Economou: Trio

    29:48

    Live recording from the Munich Summer Piano Festival
    Chick Corea, Friedrich Gulda and Nicolas Economou on three pianos (for six hands)

    This concert with these acclaimed pianists, each from widely differing piano disciplines, features them improvising together. Solo performances punctuate the concert.

    0:30 Improvisation
    12:36 Improvisation on a Baroque theme
    15:05 J.S. Bach - Air from Suite for Orchestra No. 3 (arr. by Friedrich Gulda)
    18:28 Chick Corea - Improvisation on a Children Song
    26:30 Chick Corea - Part of My Spanish Heart

    Click here for more performances by Chick Corea:

    Click here for more performances by Friedrich Gulda:

    Click here for more performances by Nicolas Economou:

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    Gulda and Herbie Hancock play All blues

    9:45

    Gulda and Herbie Hancock play Miles Davis famous composition All Blues.

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    Friedrich Gulda and Joe Zawinul play Zawinuls Volcano for Hire

    4:26

    Recorded at Philharmonie in Cologne
    May 20, 1988

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    Friedrich Gulda and Joe Zawinul - Brahms-Haydn Variations

    20:15

    The Variations on a Theme by Joseph Haydn are one of Brahms' best-known set of variations, as well as a staple in both his orchestral and two-piano repertoires (he had arranged the variations for both). From a Haydn wind ensemble Divertimento, the Chorale Saint Anthoni is the piece whose theme the variations are based on (however, its authenticity has been brought into questions - many people are skeptical of whether the piece was genuinely written by Haydn or merely published under his name). The theme is overtly asymmetrical, written in five-bar phrases. In the Brahms piece, the theme is stated, followed by eight variations upon it, and a concluding Finale movement that is a much more grand/elaborate composition based around the theme. A performance of the piece lasts approximately 20 minutes.

    Austrian pianist Friedrich Gulda is something of a renaissance man when it comes to the piano. He is one of few musicians who has garnered equal respect and acclaim as a player of both jazz and classical (other notable examples include Andre Previn and Keith Jarrett). His jazz recordings are essential, but he's also one of the leading interpreters of Beethoven and (especially) Mozart - the improvisatory skills learned/refined by jazz playing lead to some very unique interpretations of Mozart's music.

    Joe Zawinul, also Austrian, is best known for his contributions to the world of jazz - having made a name for himself playing with Cannonball Adderly and Miles Davis. He would later gain recognition as a leading member of jazz-fusion group Weather Report, and his unique use of synthesizers in Weather Report's music. As is evident in this recording, he also makes a fine classical pianist and collaborates very well with Gulda.

    Gulda and Zawinul made a few recordings together. The CD from which this recording is taken was recorded in 1988 in Koln (Cologne), Germany. Also included on the recording are Gulda's own Variations for two pianos and jazz band, and Zawinul's original composition, Volcano for Hire, for two pianos. The Brahms Varitions is the only strictly classical piece on the recording, and both players still take some liberties with it - including an improvised introduction. The recording may be purchased on Amazon here:

    Thanks for listening. Enjoy!

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    Mozart Concert for 3 pianos, Argerich, Gulda bros, Arming NJPO

    28:12

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    Friedrich Gulda and Joe Zawinul- Gulda: Variations for 2 Pianos and Jazz Band

    16:35

    Friederich Gulda's Variations for two pianos and jazz band are quite undeniably in the jazz tradition, but his classical influence is shown with the title - the theme and variations form is a highly classical type of writing. It combines some stunning jazz orchestration with brilliant pianism. Gulda certainly is no hack, nor is he a stranger to either the jazz tradition or the classical tradition.

    Austrian pianist Friedrich Gulda is something of a renaissance man when it comes to the piano. He is one of few musicians who has garnered equal respect and acclaim as a player of both jazz and classical (other notable examples include Andre Previn and Keith Jarrett). His jazz recordings are essential, but he's also one of the leading interpreters of Beethoven and (especially) Mozart - the improvisatory skills learned/refined by jazz playing lead to some very unique interpretations of Mozart's music.

    Joe Zawinul, also Austrian, is best known for his contributions to the world of jazz - having made a name for himself playing with Cannonball Adderly and Miles Davis. He would later gain recognition as a leading member of jazz-fusion group Weather Report, and his unique use of synthesizers in Weather Report's music. He collaborates very well with Gulda.

    Gulda and Zawinul made a few recordings together. The CD from which this recording is taken was recorded in 1988 in Koln (Cologne), Germany. Also included on the recording are Brahms' Variations on a Theme by Haydn, and Zawinul's original composition, Volcano for Hire, for two pianos. The Brahms Varitions is the only strictly classical piece on the recording, and both players still take some liberties with it - including an improvised introduction. The recording may be purchased on Amazon here:

    Thanks for listening. Enjoy!

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    Friedrich Gulda plays Gulda: Aria - 1990

    4:21

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Friedrich Gulda – Aria (Solo Version)

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Joe Zawinul & Herbie Hancock - Toys

    3:42

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Herbie Hancock & Joe Zawinul - piano

    Joe Zawinul & Herbie Hancock - Toys

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

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    Friedrich Gulda & Herbie Hancock: Miles Davis - All Blues

    7:37

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda & Herbie Hancock - piano

    Miles Davis - All Blues

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

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    Friedrich Gulda - Concerto for Cello and Wind Orchestra

    32:15

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1988
    From the Philharmonic Hall in Munich Gasteig
    Friedrich Gulda - conductor
    Heinrich Schiff - soloist
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Friedrich Gulda - Concerto for Cello and Wind Orchestra

    0:57 I. Overture
    6:25 II. Idyll
    14:05 III. Cadenza
    20:19 IV. Menuett
    24:05 V. Finale alla marcia

    Other Friedrich Gulda videos:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Friedrich Gulda plays Gulda: Prelude and Fugue

    4:02

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Friedrich Gulda – Prelude and Fugue

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Friedrich Gulda: Concerto for Myself, Sonata concertante for Piano and Orchestra

    44:42

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1988
    Friedrich Gulda, soloist and conductor
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Friedrich Gulda - Concerto for Myself, Sonata concertante for Piano and Orchestra

    0:25 I. The New in New - then Old is New
    13:50 II. Lament for U - Aria con variazioni
    31:30 III. For U and U / and You and You / All of me / For all of you - Rondo Finale

    Other Friedrich Gulda videos:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Joe Zawinul and Syndicate - Live in Concert

    1:6:20

    Joe Zawinul - synthesiser
    Carl Anderson - vocal
    Gerald Veasley - bass
    Scott Henderson - guitar
    Cornell Rochester - drums
    Leata Galloway - vocal
    Bill Summers - percussion

    0:04 March Of The Lost Children
    10:00 Medicine Man
    26:27 Black Water
    31:50 Solitude (Duke Ellington)
    36:17 Shadow And Light
    42:49 Improvisation
    47:00 Little Rootie Tootie (Thelonius Monk)
    56:36 Carnavalito

    Joe Zawinul (July 7, 1932 – September 11, 2007) was an Austrian jazz keyboardist and composer. First coming to prominence with saxophonist Cannonball Adderley, Zawinul went on to play with Miles Davis, and to become one of the creators of jazz fusion, an innovative musical genre that combined jazz with elements of rock and world music. Later, Zawinul co-founded the groups Weather Report and the world fusion music-oriented Zawinul Syndicate. Additionally, he made pioneering use of electric piano and synthesizers. Zawinul was named Best Electric Keyboardist 28 times by the readers of Down Beat magazine.
    A number of prominent musical artists have honored Zawinul with compositions, including Brian Eno's instrumental Zawinul/Lava, John McLaughlin's instrumental Jozy [...]. Zawinul's playing style was often dominated by quirky melodic improvisations – traversing bebop, ethnic and pop styles – combined with sparse but rhythmic playing of big-band sounding chords or bass lines. In Weather Report, he often employed a vocoder as well as pre-recorded sounds played (i.e. filtered and transposed) through a synthesizer, a method or technique called sampling, creating a very distinctive synthesis of jazz harmonies and noise [...] Classically trained at the Konservatorium Wien, Zawinul played in various broadcasting and studio bands before emigrating to the U.S. in 1959 on a music scholarship at Berklee School of Music in Boston. [...] In 1961, Zawinul joined the Quintet led by saxophonist Cannonball Adderley. [...] In the late 1960s, Zawinul recorded with Miles Davis's studio band and helped create the sound of jazz fusion. He played on the album In a Silent Way, the title track, which he composed, and the landmark album Bitches Brew, for which he contributed the twenty-minute track, Pharaoh's Dance, which occupied the whole of side one. [...]
    Zawinul, along with other Davis sidemen Chick Corea and Herbie Hancock, was one of the first to use electric pianos and early synthesizers like the ARP 2600 in 1973's Sweetnighter. He was also among the first to use an electric piano, the Wurlitzer. He used the Fender-Rhodes thereafter, adding a wah-wah pedal and later the Mutron effect unit for a complex phased timbre. [...]
    In 1970, Zawinul co-founded Weather Report with saxophonist and Davis alumnus Wayne Shorter (and later joined by Jaco Pastorius). [...] With their 4th album, Mysterious Traveller, the musical forms were now through-composed similar to classical music, and the combination of jazz harmonies with 1970s groove elements helped launch the band into its most commercially successful period. The band's biggest commercial success came from his composition Birdland, a 6-minute opus featured on Weather Report's 1977 album Heavy Weather, which peaked at number 30 on the Billboard pop albums chart. Birdland is one of the most recognizable jazz pieces of the 1970s, covered by many prominent artists from The Manhattan Transfer and Quincy Jones to Maynard Ferguson, the Buddy Rich Big Band, and Jefferson Starship. [...] The song won him three Grammys. Weather Report was active until the mid-1980s, with Zawinul and Shorter remaining the sole constant members through multiple personnel shifts. The group was notable for helping bring to prominence not only pioneering fretless electric bassist Jaco Pastorius, but also other musicians, such as Alphonso Johnson and Peter Erskine. Shorter and Zawinul had already gone separate ways, after the recording of their final Sportin' Life, when it was discovered that they had to do one more album in order to fulfill their contract with CBS records. This Is This! therefore became the band's final album. Shorter participated despite being busy leading his own group, and Peter Erskine was also brought in again for this record, and played on most of the compositions. Victor Bailey played electric bass and guitarist Carlos Santana appeared as a guest artist on the album. [...] Zawinul became ill and was hospitalized in his native Vienna in August 2007, after concluding a five-week European tour. He died a little over a month later from a rare form of skin cancer (Merkel cell carcinoma) one month later.

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    Friedrich Gulda plays Gulda – For Rico

    4:57

    In a live recording from the Amerikahaus, Munich, in 1981 Gulda reveals the versatility of his keyboard playing. On the clavichord he plays three preludes and fugues from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier; on the piano, his own re-working of Schubert's Der Wanderer, ending with Debussy's Reflects dans l'eau and a selection of his own compositions (Exercise No. 9, For Paul, Prelude and Fugue, For Rico).

    Friedrich Gulda – For Rico (Für Rico)

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Joe Zawinul - Requiem for Karajan

    8:51

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Joe Zawinul - Synthesizers

    Joe Zawinul - Requiem for Karajan

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

    Joe Zawinul's rack of synthesizers in this concert:
    Sequential Circuits T8, Korg 707, Korg Pepe (breath control synthesizer), Korg M1, Korg DW 6000...
    Help us to find out the other synthesizers!

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    Friedrich Gulda - Cello concerto - Finalle Alla Marcia

    7:17

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist who performed in both the classical and jazz fields.

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    Friedrich Gulda presents his opera Paradise Island

    31:10

    From the Philharmonic Hall of Munich, 20.07.1989
    Friedrich Gulda presents for the first time excerpts of his opera Paradise Island.

    0:25 Paradise Island - 1st Scene
    12:48 Funeral March
    18:28 Recitative
    21:02 To tréno févgi stis októ (The train leaves at eight)

    Friedrich Gulda - piano
    Agnes Baltsa - mezzo-soprano
    Joe Zawinul - synthesizer
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra
    Scott Henderson - guitar (Syndicate)
    Gerald Veasley - guitar (Syndicate)
    Harry Sokal - saxophone (Paradise Band)
    Barbara Dennerlein - hammond organ
    Cornell Rochester - drums (Syndicate)
    Michael Honzak - drums (Paradise Band)
    Bill Summers - percussion (Syndicate)
    Wayne Darling - bass (Paradise Band)

    Watch the full programme:

    Subscribe to LOFTmusic:

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    Friedrich Gulda - For Rico

    3:09

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Friedrich Gulda - For Rico

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

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    Joe Zawinul -- Mercy, Mercy, Mercy.

    2:44

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    Friedrich Gulda & Joe Zawinul - Volcano for Hire

    4:26

    Friedrich Gulda, Joe Zawinul: piano Album: Music for two pianos (1989)

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    Joe Zawinul - In My Solitude

    4:35

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Joe Zawinul - synthesizer (Korg M1, Korg DW-6000, Prophet 5)

    Joe Zawinul - In My Solitude

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

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    Friedrich Gulda: Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73

    38:27

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1989
    Friedrich Gulda, soloist and conductor
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73

    0:00 I. Allegro
    20:40 II. Adagio un poco moto
    26:39 III. Rondo. Allegro

    Other Friedrich Gulda videos:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Friedrich Gulda - Cello Concerto - Overture

    5:49

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist who performed in both the classical and jazz fields.

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    JOE ZAWINUL CONCERT

    21:01

    It was a great plesure,very special and unforgettable experience for me to play the bass on a small tour in June 2007 with incredible Joe Zawinul.This concert in Zagreb was one of the last concerts before Mr.Joe died.The band was very international and was made from the best students of jazz department from konservatory Klagenfurt in Austria.The recording is amateur and the quality is not so good,but it is the only recording that I found from this concert!

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    FRIEDRICH GULDA - MOZART PIANO CONCERTO # 20 / Munic Philharmonic Orchestra

    32:18

    Friedrich Gulda piano
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    The late pianist gives a superlative performance of Mozart's piano concerto in D, K.466. He directs from the keyboard the Munich Philharmonia Orchestra.
    1. Allegro (in D minor)
    2. Romanze (in B-flat major)
    3. Allegro assai (in D minor, ending in D major)

    Selected Comparison: UCHIDA/Camarata Salzburg


    VISIT MY BLOG SITE for articles and commentary on great Music and Audiophile Sound: The Sound Advocate

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    Friedrich Gulda & Joe Zawinul - Variations For Two Pianos and Band pt.1

    7:00

    Friedrich Gulda and Joe Zawinul. Album: Music for two pianos Composition: Friedrich Gulda. Part 1

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    Friedrich Gulda in Concert - Chopin Sonata b-minor Op. 58

    21:51

    Live recording from the Cologne Philharmonic Hall, May 1986

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    Friedrich Gulda-Light my Fire!

    8:03

    Friedrich Gulda's variation on the Doors' classic, one of his most successful and most frequently played compositions

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    Friedrich Gulda & Paradise Band live in Vienna

    22:54

    From the Vienna Konzerthaus, 14.06.1990

    Friedrich Gulda - piano
    Barbara Dennerlein - hammond organ
    Mitch Watkins - guitar
    Harry Sokal - saxophone
    Wayne Darling - bass
    Michael Honzak - drums

    0:21 Horace Silver - Opus de Funk
    9:48 Friedrich Gulda - For Paul
    17:34 Friedrich Gulda - You And Me

    Watch the full programme:

    Subscribe to LOFTmusic:

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    Friedrich Gulda and Herbie Hancock: Piano Duet

    19:50

    From the Munich Philharmonic Hall
    Munich Piano Summer Festival 1989

    0:13 Cole Porter - Night And Day
    9:40 Miles Davis - All Blues

    Watch also the first part of this concert with Friedrich Gulda playing Bach, Mozart and more:

    Subscribe to LOFTmusic:

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    joe zawinul - my people live in jazz festiwal hamburg 1996

    1:15:02

    joe zawinul - my people live in jazz festiwal hamburg 1996

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    Friedrich Gulda, Chick Corea - Blues Impro

    3:04

    From a Three-Pianos Concert with Corea-Gulda-Economou.
    Munchner KlavierSommer 1982.

    I don't own the rights of this video.From a Three-Pianos Concert

    I don't own the rights of this video.

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    Joe Zawinul & Herbie Hancock - Body and Soul

    7:45

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Herbie Hancock - piano
    Joe Zawinul - breath control synthesizer (Korg Pepe)

    Joe Zawinul & Herbie Hancock - Body and Soul

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

    In this video, Joe Zawinul seems to play the Korg Pepe, a one-of-a-kind instrument that was custom made by Korg in the mid-1980s at the request of Zawinul. It is not a synthesizer, as it has no capabilities to produce sound of its own. Rather, it is a MIDI controller consisting of a mouthpiece for breath control, and a set of accordion-like buttons. A picture of Zawinul playing the Pepe appears in the April 1988 issue of downbeat. In the accompanying article, Zawinul says, Originally, I was an accordion player and it was always my dream to have an instrument like the accordion. It looks like a bassoon mouthpiece, but I used a mouthpiece from a Melodica. On the right hand side, it's an accordion with buttons. It's very difficult to learn the accordion with two notes on each button, but with Pepe's six notes, it becomes a real head trip.
    More information on:

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    Friedrich Gulda

    4:01

    Gulda com a Paradise Band e Barbara Dennerlein

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    Joe Zawinul : Solo piano masterpiece 1978

    6:32

    Recorded October 1978, encore performance, Weather Report in concert.

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    Joe Zawinul Syndicate Jazz Open Stuttgart 1997

    1:11:27

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    Friedrich Gulda plays Gulda: Minuet from the Cello Concerto

    3:49

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Friedrich Gulda – Minuet from the Cello Concerto

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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    Joe Zawinul - Full Concert - 08/16/97 - Newport Jazz Festival

    1:1:35

    Joe Zawinul - Full Concert
    Recorded Live: 8/16/1997 - Newport Jazz Festival (Newport, RI)

    More Joe Zawinul at Music Vault:
    Subscribe to Music Vault:

    Setlist:
    0:00:00 - Patriots
    0:11:21 - Want Some Tea, Grandpa?
    0:25:02 - Drums & Percussion Jam/Bimoya
    0:33:47 - Zansa II/Carnavalito

    Personnel:
    Joe Zawinul -- keyboards, vocals
    Victor Bailey - bass
    Gary Poulson - guitar
    Manolo Badrena - percussion, vocals
    Paco Sery - drums

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    Joe Zawinul UK Documentary

    43:11

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    Mozart piano concerto 23 Gulda Abbado 2 3

    6:17

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    Chick Corea and Friedrich Gulda: The Meeting - Solo Part I

    45:08

    Live Recording from the Munich Piano Summer 1982
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    1:33 Friedrich Gulda - Paraphrase on Concerto for Ursula

    W.A. Mozart - Piano Sonata No. 10 in C major, K. 330
    5:19 I. Allegro moderato
    10:11 II. Andante cantabile
    15:40 III. Allegretto

    19:48 Friedrich Gulda - Paraphrase on Concerto for Ursula
    22:59 Friedrich Gulda - Dance
    25:58 Friedrich Gulda - Play Piano Play No. 1
    27:47 Friedrich Gulda - Aria
    33:20 Friedrich Gulda - Prelude and Fugue
    39:08 Friedrich Gulda (arr.) - Paraphrase on Die Reblaus (Traditional)

    Watch the full concert:

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    FRIEDRICH GULDA in Japan 1994 2/2

    45:18

    S-VHS → PC

    1. Schubert: Impromptu Op.90 No.4 - [0:04]
    2. Chopin: Etude Op 25 No.7 - [6:51]
    3. Chopin: Barcarolle Op.60 - [11:28]
    4. Chopin: Etude Op.15 No.2 - [20:13]
    5. Debussy: Preludes Book Ⅱ - General Lavine - [23:22]
    6. Gulda: Exercise No.5 - [25:33]
    7. Gulda: Improvisation by Viennese melody - [28:26]
    8. Schumann: Fantasiestücke Op.12 - In der Nacht - [32:53]
    9. Gulda: Aria - [37:51]
    10. Gulda: Horse drawn carriage Song - [43:27]

    Friedrich Gulda

    1994.11.15 Tokyo. Japan Live

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    Friedrich Gulda: Fiakerlied - 1990

    1:34

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Gustav Pick - Fiakerlied (Traditional, arranged by Friedrich Gulda)

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

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