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Playlist of Gnawa Music of Marrakesh

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  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh

    54:29

    Album: Night Spirit Masters. Performed by Mustapha Baqbou, Said Oughassal, Brahim El Belkani, Abdelqader Oughassal, Said Fafy and company. Recorded by Billy Youdelman in the Medina of Marrakesh, 1990. Song: Mohammed Rasoul Allal. Album: Global Celebration: Dancing with the Gods. Performed by the Halima Chedli Ensemble. Recorded by Randall Barnwell in Dar El Basha, Marrakesh, 1995.

    I want to thank Felice Willat for letting me use her photos. You can view more of her work at

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  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh - Night Spirit Masters

    48:37

    Recorded in the Medina of Marrakesh, Morocco. Released via Axiom in 1990. Sit back and enjoy these Moroccan masters at work.

  • x
  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters - Mimoun Mamrba Morocco

    5:15

    Track 2 'Mimoun Mamrba' from the 1991 album 'Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters'.

    Gnawa music is a rich repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at 'Lila's', entire communal nights of celebration, dedicated to prayer and healing, guided by the Gnawa Maalem and his group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco and the Béchar Province in South-western Algeria.

    The word 'Gnawa', plur. of Gnawi, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani word Kanawa for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate, which was a close ally of Morocco for centuries, religiously, economically, and in matters of defence. (Opinion of Essaouira Gnawa Maalems, Maalem Sadiq, Abdallah Guinia, and many others). Moroccan language often replaces K with G, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

  • Gnawa Music Of Marrakesh - Chabako

    6:29

    From LP Gnawa Music Of Marrakesh ‎– Night Spirit Masters (1990)

  • x
  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters - Tramin Morocco

    3:00

    Track 3 'Tramin' from the 1991 album 'Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters'.

    Gnawa music is a rich repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The lila comprises music, dance, costume, and incense that takes place over the course of an entire night, ending around dawn. An explicit goal of the lila is to allow participants to negotiate relationships with their melk (pl. mluk). The melk is an abstract entity that gathers a number of similar jnun (genie spirits). The ritual enables participants to enter the trance state of jadba, in which they may perform startling and sometimes spectacular dances. It is by means of these dances that participants negotiate their relationships with the mluk either placating them if they have been offended or strengthening an existing relationship.

    Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco and the Béchar Province in South-western Algeria.

    The word 'Gnawa', plur. of Gnawi, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani word Kanawa for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate, which was a close ally of Morocco for centuries, religiously, economically, and in matters of defence. (Opinion of Essaouira Gnawa Maalems, Maalem Sadiq, Abdallah Guinia, and many others). Moroccan language often replaces K with G, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters - Jillala

    4:51

    Track 8 'Jillala' from the 1991 album 'Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters'.

    Gnawa music is a rich repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The lila comprises music, dance, costume, and incense that takes place over the course of an entire night, ending around dawn. An explicit goal of the lila is to allow participants to negotiate relationships with their melk (pl. mluk). The melk is an abstract entity that gathers a number of similar jnun (genie spirits). The ritual enables participants to enter the trance state of jadba, in which they may perform startling and sometimes spectacular dances. It is by means of these dances that participants negotiate their relationships with the mluk either placating them if they have been offended or strengthening an existing relationship.

    Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco and the Béchar Province in South-western Algeria.

    The word 'Gnawa', plur. of Gnawi, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani word Kanawa for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate, which was a close ally of Morocco for centuries, religiously, economically, and in matters of defence. (Opinion of Essaouira Gnawa Maalems, Maalem Sadiq, Abdallah Guinia, and many others). Moroccan language often replaces K with G, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

  • x
  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters - Baba lRouami

    3:08

    Track 1 'Baba 'l'Rouami' from the 1991 album 'Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters'.

    Gnawa music is a rich repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The lila comprises music, dance, costume, and incense that takes place over the course of an entire night, ending around dawn. An explicit goal of the lila is to allow participants to negotiate relationships with their melk (pl. mluk). The melk is an abstract entity that gathers a number of similar jnun (genie spirits). The ritual enables participants to enter the trance state of jadba, in which they may perform startling and sometimes spectacular dances. It is by means of these dances that participants negotiate their relationships with the mluk either placating them if they have been offended or strengthening an existing relationship.

    Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco and the Béchar Province in South-western Algeria.

    The word 'Gnawa', plur. of Gnawi, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani word Kanawa for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate, which was a close ally of Morocco for centuries, religiously, economically, and in matters of defence. (Opinion of Essaouira Gnawa Maalems, Maalem Sadiq, Abdallah Guinia, and many others). Moroccan language often replaces K with G, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

  • Gnaoua music in Marrakech

    1:20

    Street musisians of Gnaoua/ Jama-al-Fnaa square. dec. 2008

  • Gnawa musicians @ Jemaa El Fna In Marrakech

    3:56

    Amoureux de la musique Gnaoua-rejoignez nous sur notre page Gnawa

  • x
  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters - Toura Toura Tour Kelila Morocco

    4:10

    Track 6 'Toura Toura Tour Kelila' from the 1991 album 'Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters'.

    Gnawa music is a rich repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The lila comprises music, dance, costume, and incense that takes place over the course of an entire night, ending around dawn. An explicit goal of the lila is to allow participants to negotiate relationships with their melk (pl. mluk). The melk is an abstract entity that gathers a number of similar jnun (genie spirits). The ritual enables participants to enter the trance state of jadba, in which they may perform startling and sometimes spectacular dances. It is by means of these dances that participants negotiate their relationships with the mluk either placating them if they have been offended or strengthening an existing relationship.

    Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco and the Béchar Province in South-western Algeria.

    The word 'Gnawa', plur. of Gnawi, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani word Kanawa for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate, which was a close ally of Morocco for centuries, religiously, economically, and in matters of defence. (Opinion of Essaouira Gnawa Maalems, Maalem Sadiq, Abdallah Guinia, and many others). Moroccan language often replaces K with G, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

  • Nass Marakech - Zeye Mechel Gnawa

    6:06

    The song 'Zeye Mechel' is included on the 2004 compilation album 'Rough Guide To Music of Morocco' by the Gnawa group Nass Marrakech formed in 1991. Desert sounds from Casablanca to Marrakech.

  • Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters - Said Fafy Drum Solo

    2:16

    Track 9 'Said Fafy Drum Solo' from the 1991 album 'Gnawa Music of Marrakesh Night Spirit Masters'.

    Gnawa music is a rich repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The lila comprises music, dance, costume, and incense that takes place over the course of an entire night, ending around dawn. An explicit goal of the lila is to allow participants to negotiate relationships with their melk (pl. mluk). The melk is an abstract entity that gathers a number of similar jnun (genie spirits). The ritual enables participants to enter the trance state of jadba, in which they may perform startling and sometimes spectacular dances. It is by means of these dances that participants negotiate their relationships with the mluk either placating them if they have been offended or strengthening an existing relationship.

    Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco and the Béchar Province in South-western Algeria.

    The word 'Gnawa', plur. of Gnawi, is taken to be derived from the Hausa-Fulani word Kanawa for the residents of Kano, the capital of the Hausa-Fulani Emirate, which was a close ally of Morocco for centuries, religiously, economically, and in matters of defence. (Opinion of Essaouira Gnawa Maalems, Maalem Sadiq, Abdallah Guinia, and many others). Moroccan language often replaces K with G, which is how the Kanawa, or Hausa people, were called Gnawa in Morocco.

  • Al-Maghrib Marrakesh, Morocco - Yomala

    6:05

    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Al-Maghrib Marrakesh, Morocco - Ada

    9:31

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    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Hamza Nmini - El Hadia

    6:02

    Hamza Nmini - El Hadia
    Young gnawa talents of Marrakesh

  • Al-Maghrib

    10:47

    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Al-Maghrib Marrakesh, Morocco - Itchalaba titara

    12:59

    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    1:9:49

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    46:00

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    54:13

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • x
  • Maalem Mohamed Kouyou Boiler Room Marrakech Live Performance

    1:57

    ► Download audio: ► More here:
    ► Prepare yourself for a triplet-induced transcendental experience with one of the maestros of gnawa music.

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    48:37

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Gnawa Lila in Marrekech with Malem Mustafa Bakbou

    3:20

    A small segment of an all night Gnawa Lila in Marrekech.
    Malem Mustafa Bakbou on gimbri. Filmed by Michael Wolfe in Winter, 1990.

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    1:19:28

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    51:30

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    1:13:58

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    58:37

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    45:05

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Maalem Mustafa Bakbou - Gnawa Lila 1

    3:11

    Gnawa Lila - Maalem Mustafa Baqbou

  • Al-Maghrib Marrakesh, Morocco - Yobati - Kalkani bûlîla

    6:42

    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Al-Maghrib Marrakesh, Morocco - Mimuna

    6:32

    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Al-Maghrib Marrakesh, Morocco - Buderbala - Buhala

    8:57

    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
    Artists: Bakbou, Ahmet - sintir
    Bakbou, Ahmet - vocals
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - percussion
    Hamzaoui, Ahmed - vocals
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - percussion
    Mahdjoub, Kharmouss - vocals
    Lechhab, Marchane Abdelkbir - vocals
    Album: The Music of Islam, Vol. 6: Al-Maghrib (Gnawa Music) Marrakesh, Morocco.
    Year: 1998

    Ten years in the making, The Music of Islam series recorded in Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia, Turkey, Yemen, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran and Qatar represents the most comprehensive sound documentation available to Westerners today, of a world religion dating back to 1/622. Although governed by strict rules for fourteen centuries, contact with other cultures has radically affected Islamic music throughout history. As the world enters the XV/21st century the timing of this collection serves an even larger purpose, documenting the traditions that have survived and will continue to survive for centuries to come. Today, one fifth of the world's population, one billion people, are Muslims, occupying a large territory stretching from the Atlantic shore of north and west Africa, through west, central, and south Asia to island southeast Asia, and attracting an increasing following in India, western Europe, north America, east Asia, and southern Africa. This is a global presence which cannot be ignored.

    This volume features songs from various sections of the lila (music ritual) repertoire of the Gnawa. The Gnawa inhabit the same religious world as Arab Muslim Moroccans, yet find their entry into it via a different path. Instead of reciting prayers in preparation of trance ceremonies, the Gnawa's authority is invoked by recounting their people's experience as in Ulad Bambara (track 1). A long suite of songs, it opens with praise to God and the Prophet Muhammad and his daughter Lalla Fatima, but also refers to the Gnawa centers, including Marrakesh, as well as entreat the assembly to make pilgrimage to the local awliya' saints. Thus establishing the present location in Muslim Morocco, the song moves south and recalls the Gnawa's lands and people of origin as well as some spirits of West African origin and the abduction and transporting of slaves from the Sudan. The singing ends with the proclamation of faith and gives way to a series of dances. Singing in a call/response style—the lead singer being answered by other members of the group in chorus—the lead singer determines the length of sung portions, while the sintir signals changes in tempos or meter, announces new songs by switching the melody, and signals the ends of songs with cadential cues. The songs are flexible in length, allowing the leader to shorten or lengthen a song to accommodate the needs of dancers in trance.

    This present video is fan-made with no commercial purpose.
    ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ஜ۩۞۩ஜ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●

  • Marrakesh Gnawa Music of Morocco موسيقى المغرب

    13:27

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    37:14

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    1:11:02

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Music of Morocco : My Soul is Guembrified 4

    32:18

    Music of Morocco : My Soul is Guembrified
    Musique du Maroc : My Soul is Guembrified
    Música de Marreucos : My Soul is Guembrified
    موسيقى مغربية

    Let's make this project bigger !
    To Subscribe :


    Part 1 :
    Part 2 :
    Part 3 :
    Part 4 :
    Part 5 :
    Part 6 :
    Part 7 :

    Playlist :
    00:00 Gnawa Music of Marrakesh - Chabako
    06:23 Gnawa Music of Marrakesh - Hamouda
    12:18 Sidi Yassir - Sala A Nabi
    18:33 Gnawa Music of Marrakesh - Bania
    24:31 Maalem Si Mohamed Chaouqi - Fangara Fangarié (Ouled Bambara)
    27:47 Maalem Abdenbi El Meknassi - Soudablanki Kamamelou

    To buy this Music :
    Maalem Abdenbi El Meknassi - Swakn :
    Sidi Yassir - Ajeeb :

  • Gnawa Marrakech كناوة

    37:27

    Music of Morocco [] Gnawa Marrakech Performance [] كناوة

  • Morocco Gnawa Music

    1:14:25

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Maroc Gnawa Music

    58:33

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

    Traditional Music Channel © All Rights Reserved

  • Gnawa music in Marrakech

    37

    Musicisti berberi in piazza Jama El Fna

  • Maalem Mahmoud Guinia Boiler Room Marrakech Live Performance

    1:3:05

    ► Download audio: ► More here:
    ► An incredible glimpse into one of the world's oldest musical cultures. Maalem Mahmoud Guinia blew us away in Marrakech.

  • Documentaire Gnawa Music

    6:40

    Allay Irham Maalem...!!

  • Ziad Oujeaa, Khamlia, Gnaoua Music, Merzouga, Morocco, The Sahara.

    3:45

  • gnawa maroc marrakech

    3:45

    gnawa ( magic music )

  • Gnawa on Marrakech Streets

    2:57

    Listening to Omar Agnaoui - street musician in Marrakech

  • Morocco Gnawa Music Soul Of Morocco Gnawi Ritual Music

    5:44

    Morocco Gnawa Music Soul Of Morocco Gnawi Ritual Music

    Gnawa music is a rich Moroccan repertoire of ancient African Islamic spiritual religious songs and rhythms. Its well-preserved heritage combines ritual poetry with traditional music and dancing. The music is performed at lila, entire communal nights of celebration dedicated to prayer and healing guided by the Gnawa maalem, or master musician, and their group of musicians and dancers. Though many of the influences that formed this music can be traced to sub-Saharan West-Africa, its traditional practice is concentrated in Morocco.

    Traditional Music Channel is for everyone who has a passion for music and cultural heritage.
    Whether you are an educator, artist, archivist, student or music enthusiast.
    With your support we can continue our mission.

    With recordings from more than hundred nations our Collection of Traditional Music offers a staggering diversity of our shared humanity.

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  • GNAWA MUSIC.

    7:52

    The best music ever.

  • Music of Morocco : My Soul is Guembrified 1

    38:00

    Music of Morocco : My Soul is Guembrified
    Musique du Maroc : My Soul is Guembrified
    Música de Marreucos : My Soul is Guembrified
    موسيقى مغربية

    Let's make this project bigger !
    To Subscribe :


    Part 1 :
    Part 2 :
    Part 4 :

    Playlist
    00:00 Nour Eddine - Laafou
    03:34 Hamid El Gnawi - Foufoudanba
    08:34 Nour Eddine - Jalaban
    11:55 Hamid El Gnawi - Ali Ben Hamdouch
    18:41 Nour Eddine - Soudani
    24:22 Hamid El Gnawi - Hyana Why
    32:14 Nour Eddine - La Illah Illa Allah

    Mixed by : Hatim Belhouari

  • Moroccan Gnawa Music - The Beauty Of Morocco

    46:12

    Gnawa music mixes classical Islamic Sufism with pre-Islamic African traditions, whether local or sub-Saharan. The term Gnawa musicians generally refers to people who also practice healing rituals, with apparent ties to pre-Islamic African animism rites. In Moroccan popular culture, Gnawas, through their ceremonies, are considered to be experts in the magical treatment of scorpion stings and psychic disorders. They heal diseases by the use of colors, condensed cultural imagery, perfumes and fright.

    Gnawas play deeply hypnotic trance music, marked by low-toned, rhythmic sintir melodies, call-and-response singing, hand clapping and cymbals called krakeb (plural of karkaba). Gnawa ceremonies use music and dance to evoke ancestral saints who can drive out evil, cure psychological ills, or remedy scorpion stings.

    Gnawa music has won an international profile and appeal. Many Western musicians including Bill Laswell, Brian Jones, Randy Weston, Adam Rudolph, Tucker Martine, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, have drawn on and collaborated with Gnawa musicians such as Mahmoud Guinia. Some traditionalists regard modern collaborations as a mixed blessing, leaving or modifying sacred traditions for more explicitly commercial goals. International recording artists such as Hassan Hakmoun have introduced Gnawa music and dance to Western audiences through their recordings and concert performances.
    For more videos ... check our channel :)

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  • Nass Marrakech - Lalla Aicha & Hamdouchia

    14:56

    Amoureux de la musique Gnaoua rejoignez nous sur notre page Gnawa

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