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Playlist of Friedrich Gulda

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  • Friedrich Gulda: Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73

    38:27

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1989
    Friedrich Gulda, soloist and conductor
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Ludwig van Beethoven - Piano Concerto No. 5 in E flat major Op. 73

    0:00 I. Allegro
    20:40 II. Adagio un poco moto
    26:39 III. Rondo. Allegro

    Other Friedrich Gulda videos:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Piano Concerto in D minor K 466

    34:42

    Live recording from the Munich Summer Piano Festival (1986)
    Friedrich Gulda - piano
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Piano Concerto in D minor K 466

    1:15 Allegro
    15:40 Romance
    24:45 Rondeau (Allegro assai)

    Watch the full concert:

  • x
  • Friedrich Gulda & Herbie Hancock: Miles Davis - All Blues

    7:37

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda & Herbie Hancock - piano

    Miles Davis - All Blues

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

  • Friedrich Gulda - Variations

    12:20

    Friedrich Gulda, piano
    =====
    It is interesting to compare the following two sets of variations. Both demand virtuoso technique, but the second - based on sixteen-bar series of long drawn out bass notes, is more serious, more esoteric, less for the broad listening public, more rewarding for the connoisseur. It is also highly demanding as far as piano technique is concerned, and more interesting in terms of harmony and rhythm because its fundamental character is more that of jazz.

    More detailed analysis is hardly necessary; the attentive listener can pick out everything for himself. Even so, just one or two points; the first variation combines elements of Rameau with a harmonic structure from the theme which is distinctly reminiscent of Coltrane. At this stage, such bold associations present Gulda with no problems. A turn to the major in the alla breve section, a burst of free jazz before the reprise and then the finale, fading away into the distance. The ending is provided by a firm fortissimo bass note.

    - review from the CD liner notes by Dr. Georg Baumgarten written in 1973, translated by John Wilde, and updated in 2005 by Gail Schamberger
    =====
    This was made with Windows Live Movie Maker. I could've used a non-linear video editor, but my old PC can't handle those types of software.
    =====
    For thenameisgsarci, Ashish, and all the people who have made sheet music videos for the classical music community.
    =====
    Please send me a private message for further concerns.

  • x
  • FRIEDRICH GULDA - GULDA JAZZ

    44:09

    Enjoy the album.

    Details:

  • Friedrich Gulda plays Bach, Schubert, Debussy, Gulda

    54:26

    JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH
    From The Well-Tempered Clavier:
    00:16 Prelude and Fugue in A minor BWV 889 (Book II) *
    11:01 Prelude and Fugue in C major BWV 846 (Book I) *
    15:37 Prelude and Fugue in A flat major BWV 886 (Book II) *

    FRANZ SCHUBERT (arr. Friedrich Gulda)
    22:59 Der Wanderer D 489

    CLAUDE DEBUSSY
    29:31 Reflets dans l'eau (from Images I)
    34:21 La Soirée dans Grenade (from Estampes)

    FRIEDRICH GULDA
    40:02 Übungsstück, no. 9 (Excercise No. 9 from Play Piano Play)
    41:52 Für Paul
    46:10 Prelude and Fugue
    50:58 Für Rico *

    FRIEDRICH GULDA, piano, clavichord *

    Filmed at Amerikahaus Munich, Germany, 27 February 1981

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  • Friedrich Gulda/Albert Golowin: Du und I

    3:36

    Friedrich Gulda, piano
    J.A. Rettenbacher, bass
    Manfred Josel, drums
    Albert Golowin, vocals

  • FRIEDRICH GULDA in Japan 1994 2/2

    45:18

    S-VHS → PC

    1. Schubert: Impromptu Op.90 No.4 - [0:04]
    2. Chopin: Etude Op 25 No.7 - [6:51]
    3. Chopin: Barcarolle Op.60 - [11:28]
    4. Chopin: Etude Op.15 No.2 - [20:13]
    5. Debussy: Preludes Book Ⅱ - General Lavine - [23:22]
    6. Gulda: Exercise No.5 - [25:33]
    7. Gulda: Improvisation by Viennese melody - [28:26]
    8. Schumann: Fantasiestücke Op.12 - In der Nacht - [32:53]
    9. Gulda: Aria - [37:51]
    10. Gulda: Horse drawn carriage Song - [43:27]

    Friedrich Gulda

    1994.11.15 Tokyo. Japan Live

  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin - Nocturne, Op. 62 No. 1

    7:12

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Frédéric Chopin - Nocturne, Op. 62 No. 1

    Watch the complete programme Chopin pour ma douce:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.
    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • x
  • Friedrich Gulda - Air From Other Planets

    5:14

    Friedrich Gulda, piano
    Recorded 1969
    ---
    re-upload

  • Friedrich Gulda - Bach: English Suite No.3 & Beethoven: Eroica Variations, Sonata Hammerklavier

    1:17:31

    JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH
    English Suite No.3 in G minor, BWV 808
    00:00:23 1. Prelude
    00:03:36 2. Allemande
    00:06:20 3. Courante
    00:08:07 4. Sarabande
    00:10:58 5. Gavotte I
    00:12:42 6. Gavotte II (Musette)
    00:14:27 7. Gigue

    LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN
    Eroica Variations, Op.35
    00:17:49 Introduzione col Basso del Tema
    00:20:56 Var. I
    00:21:29 Var. II
    00:22:18 Var. III
    00:22:55 Var. IV
    00:23:29 Var. V
    00:24:11 Var. VI
    00:24:43 Var. VII
    00:25:20 Var. VIII
    00:26:07 Var. IX
    00:26:40 Var. X
    00:27:13 Var. XI
    00:27:49 Var. XII
    00:28:22 Var. XIII
    00:28:58 Var. XIV
    00:30:28 Var. XV
    00:35:15 Finale: Alla Fuga

    Piano Sonata No.29 in B flat major, Op.106 Hammerklavier
    00:40:48 I. Allegro
    00:48:16 II. Scherzo: Assai vivace - Presto - Tempo I
    00:50:41 III. Adagio sostenuto appassionato e con molto sentimento
    01:06:32 IV. Introduzione: Largo - Fuga: Allegro risoluto

    FRIEDRICH GULDA, piano

    Filmed at the Beethovenfest, Bonn, Germany, 1970

  • Friedrich Gulda plays Gulda: Aria - 1990

    4:21

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Friedrich Gulda – Aria (Solo Version)

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda-Light my Fire!

    8:03

    Friedrich Gulda's variation on the Doors' classic, one of his most successful and most frequently played compositions

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Sonata No. 13 in B-flat major, KV 333

    29:03

    Live recording from 1995
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Sonata in B-flat major, KV 333

    0:07 I. Allegro
    11:14 II. Andante cantabile
    21:54 III. Allegretto grazioso

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda - Play Piano Play

    32:55

    woow, great..!! what about Gulda's play piano play? :) (Chen Ben David)

    The ten pieces in the collection entitled Play Piano Play are designated in the score as ‘exercises’ (‘Übungsstücke’ in German). Gulda originally designed the series for didactic purposes as one of the steps within what he once called ‘the long road to freedom’, i.e. a progressive forsaking of all the stylistic strictures of conventionally notated music, along with a freer stylistic approach. One can understand them as ‘exercises’ if one considers that they are very useful in providing classically trained performers with the means to learn how to ‘swing’, and in teaching them how jazz inflections differ from classical music. However, Gulda’s designation of them as ‘exercises’ is overly modest, and should not deter pianists from attempting groups of them in recitals, despite the fact that some of them require a certain amount of improvisation. These ten pieces are wonderfully refreshing, and demand to be much better known.

    (Hyperion)

    Please take note that the audio AND sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to a minimum of 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio:
    (Performance by: Sasha Grynyuk)
    Original sheet music: you can PM me for the sheet music

  • Gulda plays Bach Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue

    9:55

    Gulda plays Bach Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue (BWV 903)
    1964

  • FRIEDRICH GULDA plays BEETHOVEN - MOONLIGHT PIANO SONATA OP. 27 N. 2

    15:54

    The great Austrian pianist Friedrich Gulda here plays Piano Sonata op. 27 n. 2 Moonlight by Beethoven.
    Enjoy it!

  • Friedrich Gulda - Suite for piano, electric piano and drums

    17:34

    Classical and jazz pianist and composer, Friedrich Gulda was one of Austria's premiere pianists. Born in Vienna in 1930, Gulda started piano lessons at the age of seven. When he was 12, he enrolled in the Vienna Music Academy, and four years later received first place in the Geneva International Music Festival. In 1949, Gulda toured Europe and South America, earning international acclaim for his treatments of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven, and the following year he successfully debuted at Carnegie Hall. Gulda became more involved in jazz from 1951 on, when he improvised with Dizzy Gillespie following a performance with the Chicago Symphony. Five years later, Gulda played his first American jazz concert at Birdland (N.Y.C.), followed by a performance at the Newport Jazz Festival. After this, Gulda formed the Eurojazz Orchestra, a jazz combo and big band which drew from both jazz and classical compositions. In 1966, ten years after his Birdland appearance, Gulda organized a modern jazz competition in his native city. He was awarded the Vienna Academy's Beethoven Ring in 1970, but later returned it to protest what he regarded as a constricting educational system. This only reinforced the public's perception of Gulda as an eccentric. This reputation was not helped when he abruptly called off major performances more than once. A 1988 incident occurred in reaction to objections to his program for a Salzburg music festival that included jazz musician Joe Zawinul; he made another last minute cancellation by faking his own death with a phony obituary only days before a scheduled performance of Mozart. On January 27, 2000, Friedrich Gulda died of an apparent heart attack in Vienna, the city of his birth.

    (AllMusic)

    Please take note that the audio AND sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to a minimum of 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio:




    (Performance by: the composer at the pianos, accompanied by drummer Klaus Weiss)
    Original sheet music: it seems that the original source was deleted.

  • Friedrich Gulda plays Gulda – For Rico

    4:57

    In a live recording from the Amerikahaus, Munich, in 1981 Gulda reveals the versatility of his keyboard playing. On the clavichord he plays three preludes and fugues from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier; on the piano, his own re-working of Schubert's Der Wanderer, ending with Debussy's Reflects dans l'eau and a selection of his own compositions (Exercise No. 9, For Paul, Prelude and Fugue, For Rico).

    Friedrich Gulda – For Rico (Für Rico)

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda & Joe Zawinul...so blues!so groove! II

    7:53

    secondo blues tratto da un concerto del 1986 di due grandi musicisti viennesi:il sommo pianista classico Friedrich Gulda di cui non tutti conoscono le divagazioni nel jazz e nella free music ed il jazzista Joseph Zawinul.Il concerto inizia - come d'abitudine nei concerti di Gulda - con brani della tradizione classica viennese(Schubert - Beethoven);seguono composizioni jazz di Gulda e poi entra in scena Zawinul che suona solo e in duo: i due maestri improvvisando regalano musica non convenzionale e di indubbio interesse(anche con l'ausilio di effetti elettronici) in cui armonie jazz e free music si compenetrano...

    Alessandro Caruso

    consulenza tecnica: Alessandro Avitabile

  • x
  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin - Préludes Op. 28 Nos. 15,10,9,3,4,7,21,24

    18:16

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Frédéric Chopin - Préludes Op. 28 Nos. 15,10,9,3,4,7,21,24

    0:06 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 15 Des-dur
    4:44 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 10 cis-moll
    5:10 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 9 E-dur
    6:27 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 3 G-dur
    7:26 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 4 e-moll
    9:33 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 7 A-dur
    10:16 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 13 Fis-dur
    13:43 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 21 B-dur
    15:02 Prélude Op. 28 Nr. 24 d-moll

    Watch the complete programme Chopin pour ma douce:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.
    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda - As You Like It

    44:05

    Friedrich Gulda ?As You Like It
    MPS Records
    Germany 1970

    00:00 A1 Blues For H. G. (Gulda)
    06:00 A2 I Only Have Eyes For You (Dubin,Warren)
    11:13 A3 What Is This Thing Called Love (Porter)
    16:22 A4 All Blues (Davis,Brown Jr.)

    21:59 B1 Light My Fire (The Doors)
    29:36 B2 Round Midnight (Hanighen, Williams, Monk)
    36:27 B3 East Of The Sun (Bowman)

    Bass – J.A. Rettenbacher
    Drums – Klaus Weiss
    Piano – Friedrich Gulda

    Recorded February 1970.

  • Chick Corea and Friedrich Gulda: The Meeting - Solo Part I

    45:08

    Live Recording from the Munich Piano Summer 1982
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    1:33 Friedrich Gulda - Paraphrase on Concerto for Ursula

    W.A. Mozart - Piano Sonata No. 10 in C major, K. 330
    5:19 I. Allegro moderato
    10:11 II. Andante cantabile
    15:40 III. Allegretto

    19:48 Friedrich Gulda - Paraphrase on Concerto for Ursula
    22:59 Friedrich Gulda - Dance
    25:58 Friedrich Gulda - Play Piano Play No. 1
    27:47 Friedrich Gulda - Aria
    33:20 Friedrich Gulda - Prelude and Fugue
    39:08 Friedrich Gulda (arr.) - Paraphrase on Die Reblaus (Traditional)

    Watch the full concert:

  • Friedrich Gulda & Joe Zawinul...so blues!so groove!

    6:58

    rocambolesco C#M blues tratto da un concerto del 1986 di due grandi musicisti viennesi:il sommo pianista classico Friedrich Gulda di cui non tutti conoscono le divagazioni nel jazz e nella free music ed il jazzista Joseph Zawinul.Il concerto inizia - come d'abitudine nei concerti di Gulda - con brani della tradizione classica viennese(Schubert - Beethoven);seguono composizioni jazz di Gulda e poi entra in scena Zawinul che suona solo e in duo: i due maestri improvvisando regalano musica non convenzionale e di indubbio interesse(anche con l'ausilio di effetti elettronici) in cui armonie jazz e free music si compenetrano...

    Alessandro Caruso

    consulenza tecnica: Alessandro Avitabile

  • Friedrich Gulda - Aria

    4:49

    Classical and jazz pianist and composer, Friedrich Gulda was one of Austria's premiere pianists. Born in Vienna in 1930, Gulda started piano lessons at the age of seven. When he was 12, he enrolled in the Vienna Music Academy, and four years later received first place in the Geneva International Music Festival. In 1949, Gulda toured Europe and South America, earning international acclaim for his treatments of Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven, and the following year he successfully debuted at Carnegie Hall. Gulda became more involved in jazz from 1951 on, when he improvised with Dizzy Gillespie following a performance with the Chicago Symphony. Five years later, Gulda played his first American jazz concert at Birdland (N.Y.C.), followed by a performance at the Newport Jazz Festival. After this, Gulda formed the Eurojazz Orchestra, a jazz combo and big band which drew from both jazz and classical compositions. In 1966, ten years after his Birdland appearance, Gulda organized a modern jazz competition in his native city. He was awarded the Vienna Academy's Beethoven Ring in 1970, but later returned it to protest what he regarded as a constricting educational system. This only reinforced the public's perception of Gulda as an eccentric. This reputation was not helped when he abruptly called off major performances more than once. A 1988 incident occurred in reaction to objections to his program for a Salzburg music festival that included jazz musician Joe Zawinul; he made another last minute cancellation by faking his own death with a phony obituary only days before a scheduled performance of Mozart. On January 27, 2000, Friedrich Gulda died of an apparent heart attack in Vienna, the city of his birth.


    (AllMusic)

    Please take note that the audio AND the sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to a minimum of 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio:
    (Performance by: Friedrich Gulda)
    Original sheet music:

  • Friedrich Gulda - Prelude and Fugue

    4:19

    The Prelude and Fugue has the interesting distinction of having been played and recorded by none other than Keith Emerson, of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, on the album Welcome Back My Friends to the Show That Never Ends. The swinging arpeggio patterns of the prelude pave the way for a highly syncopated fugue subject, developed at a frenetic pace and keeping the performer busy disentangling some rather gnarly four-part writing. At the point of highest excitement, just before the coda, the score breaks off, and Gulda calls on the pianist to improvise the rest of the piece. This is probably the main reason why this tremendously exciting and beguiling work, though several decades old, has not so far entered the repertoire.

    (Hyperion)

    Please take note that the audio AND the sheet music ARE NOT mine. Change the quality to 480p if the video is blurry.

    Original audio:
    Original sheet music:

    NB. If my memory is right, someone published a video similar to this one a long time ago, using Marc-Andre Hamelin's recording, but was removed for some reason.

  • Friedrich Gulda: J. S. Bach - Air from Suite No. 3 in D major for Orchestra No. 3, BWV 1068

    3:25

    Live recording from the Munich Summer Piano Festival (1982)
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Johann Sebastian Bach - Air from Suite No. 3 in D major for Orchestra No. 3 BWV 1068

    Watch the full concert with Friedrich Gulda, Chick Corea & Nicolas Economou:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Franz Schubert – Impromptu in G flat major Op. 90 No. 3

    4:40

    On November 19th of 1990 Friedrich Gulda gave an encompassing account of his unique art in an uninterrupted 90-minute solo performance at the Philharmonie in Munich, Germany. LOFT music is proud to have presented and recorded this memorable musical event.

    Franz Schubert – Impromptu in G flat major Op. 90 No. 3

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda & Paradise Band live in Vienna

    22:54

    From the Vienna Konzerthaus, 14.06.1990

    Friedrich Gulda - piano
    Barbara Dennerlein - hammond organ
    Mitch Watkins - guitar
    Harry Sokal - saxophone
    Wayne Darling - bass
    Michael Honzak - drums

    0:21 Horace Silver - Opus de Funk
    9:48 Friedrich Gulda - For Paul
    17:34 Friedrich Gulda - You And Me

    Watch the full programme:

    Subscribe to LOFTmusic:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Piano Concerto in D major K 537

    32:46

    Live recording from the Munich Summer Piano Festival (1986)
    Friedrich Gulda - piano
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Piano Concerto in D major K 537 (Coronation)
    0:25 Allegro
    14:22 Larghetto
    20:30 Allegretto

    Watch the full concert:

  • Friedrich Gulda Beethoven Piano Sonata no.31 op. 110 LIVE

    7:29

    Japan concert 1993

  • Friedrich Gulda & Claudio Abbado - Mozart: Piano Concerto K488

    25:10

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART
    Piano Concerto No.23 in A major, K488
    00:00:03 I. Allegro
    00:11:18 II. Adagio
    00:17:32 III. Allegro assai

    FRIEDRICH GULDA, piano
    Chamber Orchestra of Europe
    CLAUDIO ABBADO, conductor

    UNICEF Concert at the Konzerthaus Wien - 11 December 1986

  • Friedrich Gulda - Concerto for Cello and Wind Orchestra

    32:15

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1988
    From the Philharmonic Hall in Munich Gasteig
    Friedrich Gulda - conductor
    Heinrich Schiff - soloist
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Friedrich Gulda - Concerto for Cello and Wind Orchestra
    0:57 I. Overture
    6:25 II. Idyll
    14:05 III. Cadenza
    20:19 IV. Menuett
    24:05 V. Finale alla marcia

    Other Friedrich Gulda videos:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda plays Mozart - Fantasia K397, Piano Sonatas K 333 & K576

    49:03

    WOLFGANG AMADEUS MOZART
    00:16 Fantasia in d minor, K 397 (Allegro - Andante)

    Piano Sonata in B flat major, K 333
    05:53 I. Allegro
    16:45 II. Andante cantabile
    27:39 III. Allegretto grazioso

    Piano Sonata in D major, K 576
    34:32 I. Allegro
    39:27 II. Adagio
    44:06 III. Allegretto

    Friedrich Gulda, piano

    Liver recording in Munich, 1995

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Fantasy in C minor, KV 475

    18:26

    Live recording from the Amerikahaus in Munich, 1981.

    W.A. Mozart – Fantasy in C minor, KV 475

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda and Herbie Hancock: Piano Duet

    19:50

    From the Munich Philharmonic Hall
    Munich Piano Summer Festival 1989

    0:13 Cole Porter - Night And Day
    9:40 Miles Davis - All Blues

    Watch also the first part of this concert with Friedrich Gulda playing Bach, Mozart and more:

    Subscribe to LOFTmusic:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin - Barcarolle, Op. 60

    9:03

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Frédéric Chopin - Barcarolle, Op. 60

    Watch the complete programme Chopin pour ma douce:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.
    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda - 1st Movement

    9:38

    From his 1965 recording Music for 4 Soloists and band no. 1, featuring Freddie Hubbard, J.J. Johnson and Sahib Shihab.

    -uploaded in HD at

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Fantasia in D minor, KV 397

    5:24

    Live recording from the Münchner Klaviersommer 1990
    From the Philharmonie am Gasteig

    W.A. Mozart – Fantasia in D minor, KV 397

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda - Menuett

    3:13

    From the Salzburger Festspiele 1989
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Friedrich Gulda - Menuett

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock, Joe Zawinul and Friedrich Gulda:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Concerto for Myself, Sonata concertante for Piano and Orchestra

    44:42

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1988
    Friedrich Gulda, soloist and conductor
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    Friedrich Gulda - Concerto for Myself, Sonata concertante for Piano and Orchestra

    0:25 I. The New in New - then Old is New
    13:50 II. Lament for U - Aria con variazioni
    31:30 III. For U and U / and You and You / All of me / For all of you - Rondo Finale

    Other Friedrich Gulda videos:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Frédéric Chopin - Berceuse Op. 57

    4:52

    Live recording from the Munich Piano Summer Festival, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda - piano

    Frédéric Chopin - Berceuse Op. 57

    Watch the complete programme Chopin pour ma douce:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.
    This text is based on the Wikipedia-article Friedrich Gulda ( A list of the authors is available here:

  • Friedrich Gulda: Mozart – Sonata in F major, KV 332

    23:11

    Live recording from the Münchner Klaviersommer 1990
    From the Philharmonie am Gasteig

    W.A. Mozart – Sonata in F major, KV 332

    Watch the whole concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda - For Rico

    4:09

    Firedrich Gulda plays For Rico

  • Gulda and Zawinul concert

    2:2:54

    Gulda and Zawinul in the Weiner Konzerthauses

  • Agnes Baltsa & Friedrich Gulda: Mozart - Ch`io mio scordi di te?

    11:16

    From the Munich Philharmonic Hall, 20.07.1989

    Agnes Baltsa - soprano
    Friedrich Gulda - piano
    Munich Philharmonic Orchestra

    W.A. Mozart - Concert aria Ch`io mio scordi di te? K. 505

    Watch the full programme:

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  • Friedrich Gulda: J.S. Bach – Prelude & Fugue No. 20 in A minor, BWV 889, Well-Tempered Clavier II

    8:23

    In a live recording from the Amerikahaus, Munich, in 1981 Gulda reveals the versatility of his keyboard playing. On the clavichord he plays three preludes and fugues from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier; on the piano, his own re-working of Schubert's Der Wanderer, ending with Debussy's Reflects dans l'eau and a selection of his own compositions (Exercise No. 9, For Paul, Prelude and Fugue, For Rico).

    J.S. Bach – Prelude & Fugue No. 20 in A minor, BWV 889, Well-Tempered Clavier II

    Watch the full concert:

    Friedrich Gulda (16 May 1930 – 27 January 2000) was an Austrian pianist and composer who worked in both the classical and jazz fields.
    Born in Vienna as the son of a teacher, Gulda began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the Wiener Volkskonservatorium, aged 7. In 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx.
    He won first prize at the Geneva International Music Competition in 1946. Initially, the jury preferred the Belgian pianist Lode Backx, but when the final vote was taken, Gulda was the winner. One of the jurors, Eileen Joyce, who favoured Backx, stormed out and claimed the other jurors were unfairly influenced by Gulda's supporters. Gulda began to play concerts worldwide. He made his Carnegie Hall debut in 1950. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the Viennese troika.
    Although most famous for his Mozart and Beethoven interpretations, Gulda also performed the music of J. S. Bach (often on clavichord), Schubert, Chopin, Schumann, Debussy and Ravel. His recordings of Bach's Well Tempered Clavier are well regarded by collectors. Apart from the Well Tempered Clavier, Gulda performed very few other pieces by Bach and recorded even fewer. Gulda's later reliance on co-operating with companies whose recording techniques were primitive in comparison to those espoused by more sophisticated rivals stood him in very poor stead with regard to posterity. The rescued Mozart sonata tapes issued on DG are unbelievably bad in terms of recorded technical quality; likewise the Debussy Preludes and Bach recordings of the late 60s and early 70s.
    From the 1950s on Gulda cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces, and at times combining jazz and classical music in his concerts. In 1956, he performed at Birdland in New York City and at the Newport Jazz Festival. He organized the International Competition for Modern Jazz in 1966, and he established the International Musikforum, a school for students who wanted to learn improvisation, in Ossiach, Austria, in 1968. He once said: There can be no guarantee that I will become a great jazz musician, but at least I shall know that I am doing the right thing. I don't want to fall into the routine of the modern concert pianist's life, nor do I want to ride the cheap triumphs of the Baroque bandwagon.
    In jazz, he found the rhythmic drive, the risk, the absolute contrast to the pale, academic approach I had been taught. He also took up playing the baritone saxophone.
    Phillips Records included Gulda in its Great Pianists of the 20th Century CD box set, which came out in 1999. His piano students included Martha Argerich, who called Gulda my most important influence, and the conductor Claudio Abbado.
    He expressed a wish to die on the birthday of Mozart, the composer he most adored, and did so. He died of heart failure at the age of 69 on 27 January 2000 at his home in Weissenbach, Austria. Gulda is buried in the cemetery of Steinbach am Attersee, Austria. He was married twice, first to Paola Loew and then to Yuko Wakiyama. Two of his three sons, Paul and Rico Gulda, one from each of his marriages, are accomplished pianists.

  • Friedrich Gulda with John Surman and Kenny Wheeler - Wheel In The Right Machine

    41:19

    NDR Jazz Workshop (1970)

    Credits:
    Kenny Wheeler, trumpet, flugelhorn;
    John Surman, soprano sax, baritone sax;
    Friedrich Gulda, piano;
    Pierre Cavalli, electric guitar;
    Barre Phillips, acoustic double bass;
    Klaus Weiß, drums.

  • Friedrich Gulda: Piano Solo

    48:30

    From the Munich Philharmonic Hall
    Munich Piano Summer Festival 1989

    From the Well-Tempered Clavier Part II by Johann Sebastian Bach
    0:32 Prelude in A flat major
    4:12 Fugue in A flat major

    From the Well-Tempered Clavier Part I by Johann Sebastian Bach
    7:10 Prelude in C sharp minor
    9:06 Fugue in C sharp minor
    13:18 Prelude in G major
    14:07 Fugue in G major

    16:52 Friedrich Gulda - For Rico

    20:06 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Sonata in B flat major K 333
    20:06 Allegro
    25:09 Andante cantabile
    30:10 Allegretto grazioso

    36:29 The Doors / Friedrich Gulda (arr.) - Light My Fire

    44:40 Friedrich Gulda (arr.) - Die Reblaus (Traditional)

    Watch the full legendary concert with Herbie Hancock & Friedrich Gulda:

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  • Friedrich Gulda: Chopin Pour Ma Douce

    39:05

    From the Munich Philharmonic Hall, 1986
    Friedrich Gulda plays works from Frédéric Chopin

    0:25 Nocturne, Op. 62 No. 1
    7:15 Barcarolle, Op. 60
    16:18 Préludes Op. 28 Nos. 15, 10, 9, 3, 4, 7, 21 & 24
    34:35 Berceuse Op. 57

    Click here to watch an interesting interview with Friedrich Gulda that was produced in the same year of this recording:

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