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Playlist of Edgard Varese [1883

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  • Varèse : Hyperprism

    4:05

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Hyperprism · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1993 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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  • Varèse: Poème Electronique

    8:03

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Varèse: Poème Electronique · Edgard Varèse

    Varèse: The Complete Works

    ℗ 1998 Decca Music Group Limited

    Released on: 1998-01-01

    Producer: Andrew Cornall
    Composer: Edgar Varèse

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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  • Varèse : Intégrales

    10:45

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Intégrales · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1996 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Edgard Varèse - Tuning Up

    5:00

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965) - Tuning Up

  • x
  • Edgard Varese: Ecuatorial

    11:44

    Provided to YouTube by Nonesuch

    Edgard Varese: Ecuatorial (1934) · The Contemporary Chamber Ensemble

    Edgard Varèse: Offrandes; Intégrales; Octandre; Ecuatorial

    ℗ 1972 Elektra/Asylum/Nonesuch Records for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

    Conductor: Arthur Weisberg
    Mezzo-soprano Vocals: Jan DeGaetani
    Orchestra: The Contemporary Chamber Ensemble
    Bass: Thomas Paul
    Composer: Edgard Varese

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Varèse : Ecuatorial

    11:06

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Ecuatorial · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1996 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Bass- Baritone: Nicholas Isherwood
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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  • Edgard Varèse - Intégrales

    10:37

    Edgard Varèse (1883 - 1965) - Intégrales (1923 - 1925)

    Ensemble InterContemporain, Pierre Boulez (1984)

    Edgard Varèse's Intégrales is a work for a small ensemble of 11 winds and 4 percussionists. A typical performance lasts around 10 - 11 minutes.

    Edgard Varèse completed Intégrales in 1925. It is scored for woodwinds, brass, and 17 different percussion instruments played by four percussionists. Varèse's term ‘spatial music’ was first applied to this work, which broadly denotes a concept that pertains to all of his surviving output. It was his way of depicting music as a collection of coexisting sound properties (melody, harmony, rhythm, etc.). Instruments are chosen for the specific aspect of music they do best (the composer preferred winds and percussion) and they appear in sonic groupings that occur in different temporal durations from one another. This was dubbed ‘spatial’ music because it is easier to describe it in terms of physical and temporal space; the durations among the different blocks of sound drift closer and further apart while appearing and reappearing in variations of themselves. Tensions vary in accordance the proximity of the sound blocks.

    Intégrales is dedicated to Juliana Force, and its title is not meant to denote an association with anything extra-musical. One of Varèse's former students pointed out that this work was written in spite of the limitations of conventional instruments and notation, that the world of sound contained in this piece is not about the instruments, but the distinction of the timbres between them. Instruments are intended to either blend or contrast with other instruments depending on whether or not they are in the same sound ‘block.’ Many listeners feel that this ambivalence to instruments made Varèse better suited to music that excludes them, such as tape music, which he eventually turned to. He said that the future of sounds required composers and electrical engineers to find the solution to the outdated means of generating notes. This geometric and abstract approach to music came to him while listening to the scherzo of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony, which inspired in him a sense of, in his own works, ‘projection in space.’ Intégrales lends itself to visual impressions of celestial bodies in motion. The composer said that mathematics and astronomy inspired him; the motion of planets revolving around a star is comparable to the blocks of sound heard in this piece.

    The premiere of Intégrales was peculiar because it was so well received by the general public. At the Aeolian Hall in New York, Leopold Stokowski conducted it on March 1, 1925 to an enthusiastic crowd. This was not a group of avant-garde enthusiasts, but a more or less traditional audience who enjoyed the work so much that Stokowski was obliged to perform it again that evening. However, other than a few admiring writers, the critics hated Intégrales and mocked the piece at length. It is possible that this work offended the sensibilities of a writing community that had spent years building a meaningful way of talking about new music. Varèse's output still eludes easy description and the vast majority of musical terms and ideas available to listeners and writers do not pertain to his style. His own descriptions of his works are often opaque. Listeners without an extended musical vocabulary have the advantage of not instinctually attempting to turn the experience of Intégrales into words.

    (source: AllMusic)

    Original audio:

  • Edgard Varèse - Déserts

    24:24

    Edgard Varèse (1883 - 1965) - Déserts (1950 - 1954)

    I. 1st episode [0:00]
    II. 1st interpolation of organised sound [3:13]
    III. 2nd episode [5:39]
    IV. 2nd interpolation of organised sound [13:13]
    V. 3rd episode [16:26]
    VI. 3rd interpolation of organised sound [18:03]
    VII. 4th episode [21:12]

    ASKO Ensemble, Riccardo Chailly (1997)

    Déserts is a piece by Edgard Varèse for 14 winds, 5 percussionists, and electronic tape. According to Varèse the title refers to, not only the physical deserts of sand, sea, mountains, and snow, outer space, deserted city streets ... but also those of the human spirit, of that distant inner space ... where man is alone in a world of mystery and essential solitude.

    This powerfully moving work, created between 1950 and 1954, was the first piece for magnetic tape -- two-tracks of 'organized sound' -- and orchestra. Possibly first conceived when Varèse lived in the deserts of New Mexico in the mid-1930s, it was imagined to be a score to which a film would have been subsequently made -- a film consisting of images of the deserts of Earth, of the sea (vast distances under the water), of outer space (galaxies, etc.), but above all, the deserts in the mind of humankind -- especially a memory of the terrors and agonies from the world wars of the first half of the twentieth century, including concentration camps, atomic warfare, and their continuing resonances. The taped music (originally planned for an unrealized work called 'Trinum') primarily presents those images in three interpolations that separate the music for the acoustic orchestra -- winds, brass, a resonant piano, and five groups of percussion. This orchestra part expresses the gradual advance of mankind toward spiritual sunlight. The orchestra music is built from intense aggregates of sound, rather than scales for melody, and rhythm is treated not as a continuous pulse, but as a support for the sound-form, rhythm as a vibration of intensity. Of course, this highly dramatic work, in touch with the deeper, repressed emotions of world society at the time it was created (and powerful still), caused protest and violent reactions in many concert halls. It is now recognized as an exceptional example of truly humanistic music.

    (sources: Wikipedia, AllMusic)

    Original audio:

    Detailed analysis of the piece by Samuel Andreyev:
    (Part 1)
    (Part 2)

  • Varèse : Ionisation

    6:28

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Ionisation · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1996 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Percussion: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)
    Composer: VARESE

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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  • Varèse : Amériques

    23:30

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Amériques · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1993 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Varèse : Arcana

    18:36

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Arcana · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1993 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Un grand sommeil noir, song for voice & piano

    3:24

    Un grand sommeil noir, song for voice & piano
    (1906) Edgar Varese (1883- 1965)

    Tiffany DuMouchelle - Soprano
    Anne Kissel - Piano

    A Musical Feast concert on October 20, 2017
    at the Burchfield Penney Art Center
    Peter & Elizabeth C.Tower Auditorium
    SUNY Buffalo State
    Buffalo, NY

  • Ionisation

    5:58

    Provided to YouTube by Sony Music Entertainment

    Ionisation · Pierre Boulez · Edgar Varèse · New York Philharmonic Orchestra

    Varèse: Arcana, Amériques, Ionization, Offrandes, Density 21.5, Octandre & Intégrales

    ℗ 1977 Sony Music Entertainment

    Producer: Andrew Kazdin
    Engineer: Bud Graham
    Engineer: Arthur Kendy
    Engineer: Ray Moore

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Varèse - Hyperprism

    11:18

    Edgard Varèse [1883 - 1965] - Hyperprism [1923]

    Edgard Varèse experienced a compositionally fertile period between 1922 and 1925, with premieres of Offrandes, Hyperprism, Octandre, and Intégrales by New York City’s International Composers Guild. While all the Guild concerts were well attended and considered successes, Hyperprism helped Varèse achieve a notoriety rivaling Stravinsky’s Le Sacre du Printemps premiere. As writer Eric Salzman notes, 'Hyperprism brought the audience to blows and Varèse to a new kind of fame. The music was violently attacked, but it also had its defenders, notably Lawrence Gilman of the New York Herald Tribune and Paul Rosenfeld, critic of The Dial, a leading literary periodical of the day.' Composer Charles Martin Loeffler penned a bit of begrudgingly positive critique:
    'It would be the negation of all the centuries of musical progress if I were to call this music ... Nevertheless ... this piece roused in me a sort of subconscious racial memory, something elemental that happened before the beginning of recorded time. It affected me as only music of the past has affected me.'
    Some of the more acidic invective labeled the work as, 'shrieks from a zoo, the din of passing trains, the hammering of a drunken woodpecker, a thunderbolt striking a tinplate factory.' However, Hyperprism was championed by Leopold Stokowksi who conducted the work both in Philadelphia and New York; he went on to conduct several successive premieres of Varèse’s music.

    The title of the work does not infer any specific meaning, although it evokes scientific or geometric imagery. However, just as a prism scatters light, so Varèse’s musical process scatters musical fragments amongst two groups -- percussion instruments and wind instruments. In each section in the work, both groups have defined roles: primary, secondary, solo (with the other group tacit), and co-equal.
    Program Note from State University of New York, Potsdam, Crane Wind Ensemble concert program, 15 March 2018

    New York Philharmonic Ensemble Intercontemporain
    Pierre Boulez, conductor

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  • Edgard Varèse - Offrandes

    6:57

    Edgard Varèse (1883 - 1965) - Offrandes (1921)

    I. Chanson de là-haut [0:00]
    II. La croix du sud [3:11]

    Sarah Leonard, soprano
    ASKO Ensemble, Riccardo Chailly (1996)

    Edgard Varèse's Offrandes, or Offerings, is a setting of two poems by Vincente Huidobro and José Juan Tablada. The work is scored for soprano and chamber orchestra, and typically lasts around 7 minutes.

    The mesmerizing two-part Offrandes is possibly the most direct statement of his tormented inner world Edgard Varèse ever made. It's that tremor of personal pain pulsating through all the vividly colored din that Stravinsky was reacting to when he said that the first harp attack in part two nearly gives him a heart attack. He called it 'the most extraordinary noise in all of Varèse.' Offrandes is for soprano and a representative chamber orchestra, with harp and eight percussion instruments. These are used in ever-changing combinations (emphasizing percussion, winds, and brass) and with a constantly varied dynamic. Except for the vocal part, there's no melody as such. The accompaniment is all built on flinty little rhythmic gestures that sometimes mutate into a fragment of a tune. The stormy instrumental parts could almost make up a Varèse piece by themselves. They often go into a howl or die down to nervous mutterings of percussion -- ominous rattles of snare drum, woodblocks, castanets -- under the heavily chromatic vocal line. In part one, 'Chanson de là-haut' (The Song From Above), it seems as if he is suppressing a wish that the voice was a more flexible instrument, reaching so high he strains her range. In part two, 'La croix du sud' (The Southern Cross), however, on a dreamlike, apocalyptic poem by José Tablada, he's in complete control and makes the precariousness of her top notes into a potent source of dramatic tension. The point, as in all of Varèse's mature music, is color, intensity, and instrumental attack, which here evoke a vivid, haunted internal world. As Tablada says in his Apocalyptic text: '...the murdered women are awakening.' Although listeners always feel that Varèse's music is poetically composed from his subjective center, his instrumental aesthetic is more mechanical (or machine-like) than organic. The lyricism that the soprano brings to Offrandes illuminates the organic/mechanic dialectic of struggle that powers Varèse's music: the diminishing scale of the human individual in relation to humanity's rigid bureaucracies and its machines. Varèse certainly looked forward to the future, especially the musical freedoms it would bring, but the tragic sense of humanity in retreat before the brutal steamroller of conformity was a source of great spiritual suffering to him, which he movingly expressed in Offrandes.

    Full text of the poems, in French and English:

    Chanson de là-haut

    La Seine dort sous l'ombre de ses ponts.
    Je vois tourner la terre
    Et je sonne mon clairon
    Vers toutes les mers.

    Sur le chemin de ton parfum
    Toutes les abeilles et les paroles s'en vnt.
    Reine de l'Aube des Pôles,
    Rose des Vents que fane l'Automne!

    Dans ma tête un oiseau chante toute l'année.

    - Vincent Huidobro

    Song from Above

    The Seine is asleep in the shadow of its bridges.
    I watch Earth spinning,
    And I sound my trumpet
    Toward all the seas.

    On the pathway of her perfume
    All the bees and all the words depart,
    Queen of the Polar Dawns,
    Rose of the Winds that Autumn withers!

    In my head a bird sings all year long.

    - Vincent Huidobro

    La croix du sud

    Les femmes aux gestes de madrépore
    Ont des poils et des lèvres rouges d'orchidée.
    Les singes du Pôle sont albinos,
    Ambre et neige et sautent
    Vêtus d'aurore boréale.
    Dans le ciel il y a une affiche
    D'Oléo margarine.
    Voici l'arbre de la quinine
    Et la Vierge des douleurs.
    Le Zodiaque tourne dans la nuit de fièvre jaune.
    La pluie enferme tout le Tropique dans une cage de cristal.
    C'est l'heure d'enjamber le crépuscule
    Comme un zèbre vers l'Île de jadis
    Où se réveillent les femmes assassinées.

    - José Juan Tablada

    The Southern Cross

    Women with gestures of madrepores
    Have lips and hair as red as orchids.
    The monkeys at the pole are albinos,
    Amber and snow, and frisk
    Dressed in the aurora borealis.
    In the sky there is a sign,
    Oleomargarine.
    Here is the quinine tree
    And the Virgin of the Sorrows.
    The Zodiac revolves in the night of yellow fever.
    The rain olds the tropics in a crystal cage.
    It is the hour to stride over the dusk
    Like a Zebra toward the Island of Yesterday
    Where the murdered women wake.

    - José Juan Tablada

    (sources: AllMusic, lieder.net)

    Original audio:

  • Varèse - Arcana

    18:44

    Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)
    Arcana (1926-1927)
    New York Philharmonic
    Pierre Boulez

  • Edgard Varese: Octandre

    6:55

    Provided to YouTube by Nonesuch

    Edgard Varese: Octandre (1923) · The Contemporary Chamber Ensemble

    Edgard Varèse: Offrandes; Intégrales; Octandre; Ecuatorial

    ℗ 1972 Elektra/Asylum/Nonesuch Records for the United States and WEA International Inc. for the world outside of the United States.

    Conductor: Arthur Weisberg
    Mezzo-soprano Vocals: Jan DeGaetani
    Orchestra: The Contemporary Chamber Ensemble
    Bass: Thomas Paul
    Composer: Edgard Varese

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Edgard Varèse, Ecuatorial

    12:11

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Ecuatorial
    Choeurs de Radio France
    Ensemble Intercontemporain
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Complete Works Of Edgard Varèse EMS Recordings ‎– EMS401 Experemental Classical

    29:26

    *DISCLAIMER* NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. I DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTS TO MUSIC IN THIS VIDEO. I DO NOT MONETIZE THIS VIDEO. If you own copyright to this music please contact me first I will take down immediately!

  • Edgard Varèse, Hyperprism

    4:15

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Hyperprism
    Choeurs de Radio France
    Ensemble Intercontemporain
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

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  • Varèse : Octandre : I

    2:56

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Octandre : I · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1993 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Varèse - Amériques

    24:48

    Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)
    Amériques (Version originale, 1922)
    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
    Riccardo Chailly

  • Edgar Varèse - Tuning Up , Chailly/RCO

    5:07

    Excellent :)

  • Edgard Varèse - Ecuatorial

    11:33

    Edgard Varèse (1883 - 1965) - Ecuatorial (1932 - 1934)

    Kevin Deas, bass
    ASKO Ensemble, Riccardo Chailly (1997)

    Ecuatorial is a work for bass, brass, percussion, piano, organ, and ondes Martenot. It sets a text from the Popol-Vuh, translated to Spanish by Father Jimines.

    Edgard Varèse completed Ecuatorial in 1934, a work for orchestra, bass singer, electronic instruments, and an augmented percussion section. This is one of the few works by Varèse that was inspired by something extra-musical. For the most part, his titles came to him only after he was well into the writing of a composition. In this case, a book by the composer's friend got him interested in capturing some of the atmospheres within the text. The book, Legends of Guatemala, is by Guatemalan author Miguel Angel Asturias, who had also written an admiring article about the composer. When the French translation of the book appeared in 1932, Asturias sent Varèse a copy, who was struck by the inclusion of Mayan holy texts, taken from the Popol-Vuh, which inspired the composer. It was a specific supplication prayer from these excerpts that he decided to set to music, but, because his own command of Spanish was strong, he chose to work with that language rather than the French translation.

    In Ecuatorial, the composer was after the elemental spiritual health of the text's message and the sense of tragedy at its intended audience's downfall as a civilization. It is a prayer requesting peace, a good harvest, and children. A direct, ancient feel was also part of what he wanted to capture in the manner of a dramatic incantation. During its composition, Varèse relocated to the United States, after a few years moved again to Paris. The orchestration of Ecuatorial was frequently revamped. At first, the voice was scored for a chorus of bass voices, or a solo bass voice performed through a megaphone. Both approaches were considered before the non-amplified solo voice was settled on. Just as crucial to the voices was the scoring for electronic instruments. This also went through different versions, as the composer waffled between the use of the Ondes Martenot and the theremin. The problem was in finding an instrument that would work properly, which was difficult in the 1930s because the instruments were still in their infancy. In an important edit by the composer's long-time friend and associate Chou Wen-Chung, one Ondes Martenot and one theremin were decided as the ideal combination, taking into consideration the peculiarities of the work's orchestration and the improvements of both instruments since the death of Varèse in 1965. The most immediate benefit of these electronic instruments is that they can produce higher notes than even the piccolo. Another is the connotation of the purity of electronic sound, which amplifies the primitive, rough-hewn quality of the vocal line. The overall impression depicts a pre-Columbian sculpture, majestic and mysterious, and with a fecund spirituality.

    The first performance of Ecuatorial took place on April 15, 1934, in New York. Town Hall was the venue, Slonimsky conducted, and the soloist was Chase Baromeo. Generally, the audience and critics were baffled, and there was no subsequent performance for the next twenty-five years. It is not a frequently performed work, but it successfully captures the complex quality of ancient, exotic prayer that the composer was after, to a sublime extent. Many listeners feel that Ecuatorial does credit to both twentieth-century music and the text, and this successful juxtaposition of an ancient holy text and electronic sound renders the music timeless and eternal. This work was dedicated the composer's wife, Louise.

    Invocation of the Popol-Vuh, in English:
    O Builders, O Moulders! You see. You hear. De not abandon us, Spirit of the Sky, Spirit of the Earth. Give us our descendants, our posterity as long as there are days, as long as there are dawns. May green roads be many, the green paths you give us. Peaceful, very peaceful may the tribes be. Perfect, very perfect may life be, the existence you give us. O Master Giant, Path of the Lightning, Falcon! Master-magi, Powers of the sky, Procreators, Begetters! Ancient Mystery, Ancient Sorceress, Ancestress of the Day, Ancestress of the Dawn! Let there be germination, let there be Dawn.

    Hail Beauties of the Day, Givers of Yellow, of Green! Givers of Daughters, of Sons! Give life, existence to my children, to my descendants. Let not your power, let not your sorcery be their evil and their misfortune. May it be happy, the life of your upholders, your providers before your mouths, before your faces, Spirit of the Sky, Spirit of the Earth, Give Life, Give Life! Give life, O All-Enveloping Force in the Sky, on the earth, at the four corners, at the four extremities, as long as dawn exists, as long as the tribe exists.

    The Spanish text:

    (source: AllMusic)

    Original audio:

  • Poeme Electronique

    8:04

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Poeme Electronique · Edgard Varese

    Electro Acoustic Music: Classics

    ℗ 2014 Tresona Multimedia

    Released on: 2013-01-01

    Music Publisher: UNIVERSAL MUSIC-CAREERS OBO CASA RICORDI SRL.

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Poeme Electronique

    8:02

    Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises

    Poeme Electronique · Edgard Varése

    Roots of Electronica Vol. 1, European Avant-Garde, Noise and Experimental Music

    ℗ 2015 BRAIN DISCOS

    Released on: 2015-08-19

    Music Publisher: Copyright Control

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Varèse : Octandre : II

    1:44

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Octandre : II · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1993 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Edgard Varèse, Déserts

    16:21

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Déserts
    Choeurs de Radio France
    Ensemble Intercontemporain
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Ionisation - Edgar Varèse

    5:53

    Ionisation by Edgar Varèse (1883-1965) performed by the Ensemble InterConteporain conducted by Pierre Boulez.

  • Varèse : Octandre : III

    2:26

    Provided to YouTube by Warner Classics International

    Varèse : Octandre : III · Kent Nagano

    Varèse : Orchestral Works

    ℗ 1993 Erato Disques S.A.

    Conductor: Kent Nagano
    Orchestra: Orchestra National de Radio France
    Composer: Edgar Varèse (1883-1965)

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Edgard Varèse - Ionisation

    5:59

    Edgard Varèse (1883 - 1965) - Ionisation (1929 - 1931)

    The New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Pierre Boulez (1977)

    Ionisation is a work for 13 percussionists playing almost 40 percussion instruments. A typical performance lasts around 6 minutes.

    In 1917, Varèse boldly announced that he longed 'for instruments which are obedient to my thought and whim, with their contribution of a whole new world of unsuspected sounds, which will lend themselves to the exigencies of my inner rhythm.' From 1918 to 1936, Varèse abandoned tradition almost completely. Hyperprism of 1923, for example, provoked a riot at its premiere. During his quest for new sonorities and effects, which climaxed in Ionisation, Varèse incorporated new musical instruments wherever possible. Ionisation, composed between 1929 and 1931, attracted the greatest interest and divergent critical opinions of all his works. The score introduced the electrical siren as a musical instrument for the very first time, and denoted the start of Varèse' increasing interest in electronic music. Nicolas Slonimsky conducted it at Carnegie Hall, on March 6, 1933, and the composer later dedicated the work to him. Carlos Salzedo, Henry Cowell, Paul Creston, and William Schuman performed as some of the 13 instrumentalists required. Its effect was likened by a critic at the time to receiving 'a sock in the jaw.' Varèse argued in his defence that 'in music we composers are forced to use instruments that have not changed for two centuries....Composers like anyone else today are delighted to use the many gadgets continually put on the market for our daily comfort. But when they hear sounds that no violins, wind instruments, or percussion of the orchestra can produce, it does not occur to them to demand those sounds for science. Yet science is even now equipped to give them everything they may require.'

    The title is derived from the ionization of molecules, as electrons are dispersed through the process of atomic change. In Ionisation, rhythmic cells are expanded, varied, and contrasted against one another. Their timbre keeps them identifiable as each cell becomes more involved and larger, and these cells grow in such a way that renders them independent of one another. The dramatic contour is in the degrees to which these rhythmic cells, which evolve into recognizable blocks of sound, seem to not be working together, continually growing and expanding the soundscape with the friction of their coexistence. Occasional relief is found in rhythmic unisons, that bind the separate blocks of sound into a single, propulsive rush, but there are not many. Varèse loved the unmanageable aspects of nature, the things that humans have no control over, and reveled in the way that, from our perspective, nature does not run smoothly.

    (source: AllMusic)

    Original audio:

  • Edgard Varese: Ionisation

    5:58

    Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (December 22th 1883 – November 6th 1965) He was a French-born composer who spent the greater part of his career in the United States.

    Varèse's music emphasizes timbre and rhythm and he coined the term organized sound in reference to his own musical aesthetic. Varèse's conception of music reflected his vision of sound as living matter and of musical space as open rather than bounded. He conceived the elements of his music in terms of sound-masses, likening their organization to the natural phenomenon of crystalization. Varèse thought that to stubbornly conditioned ears, anything new in music has always been called noise, and he posed the question, what is music but organized noises?

    Although his complete surviving works only last about three hours, he has been recognised as an influence by several major composers of the late 20th century. Varèse saw potential in using electronic mediums for sound production, and his use of new instruments and electronic resources led to his being known as the Father of Electronic Music while Henry Miller described him as The stratospheric Colossus of Sound.

  • Edgar Varèse - Déserts , Chailly/ASKO Ensemble.

    24:23

    My favorite recording of Varèse! original tape provided by the Columbia University Computer Music Center.
    00:00 1st episode
    03:12 1st interpolation of organised sound
    05:38 2nd episode
    13:12 2nd interpolation
    16:26 3rd episode
    18:03 3rd interpolation
    21:12 4th episode

  • Edgard Varèse, Offrandes

    6:40

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Offrandes, for Soprano and Ensamble
    I Chanson de là-haut
    II La Croix du Sud

    Ensamble Intercontemporain
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Poème électronique

    8:09

    Poème électronique · Edgard Varèse

    An anthology of noise and electronic music vol,1

    ℗ sub rosa

    Released on: 2006-12-11

    Composer: Edgard Varèse

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  • Great Composers: Edgard Varèse

    24:50

    A look at the stratospheric colossus of sound.

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    Classical Nerd is a weekly video series covering music history, theoretical concepts, and techniques, hosted by composer, pianist, and music history aficionado Thomas Little.

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    Music:

    - Edgard Varèse: Amériques, performed by the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra conducted by Riccardo Chailly [original upload: 8zXaEwWFbnA]
    - Thomas Little: Dance! #2 in E minor, Op. 1 No. 2, performed by Rachel Fellows, Michael King, and Bruce Tippette

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  • Edgard Varèse – Ionization

    7:41

    Percussion Ensemble KGBL:

  • Edgard Varèse, Amériques

    24:12

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Amériques
    New York Philharmonic
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Edgard Varese - Complete Works of Edgard Varese, Volume 1 FULL ALBUM

    27:16

    More from Edgard Varese:
    spotify:
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    Artist: Edgard Varèse
    Album: Complete Works of Edgard Varèse, Volume 1
    Label: EMS Recordings
    Year: 1951


    Tracklist:

    0:00 Intégrales
    10:25 Density 21.5
    14:38 Ionisation
    20:29 Octandre - I - Assez Lent
    23:04 Octandre - II - Tres vif et nerveux
    24:49 Octandre - III - Grave - Anime et jubilatoire

    Personnel:

    Intégrales performed by Juilliard Percussion Orchestra and New York Wind Ensemble
    Density 21.5 performed by Rene Le Roy
    Ionisation performed by Juilliard Percussion Orchestra
    Octandre performed by New York Wind Ensemble

    Composed by Edgard Varèse
    Conducted by Frederic Waldman


    Support the artist if you like the music.
    I do not own any of the songs.

  • Edgar Varèse, Ionisation, Luigi Russolo

    5:51

    Edgar Varèse, Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (1883- 1965), Ionisation,
    Juilliard Percussion Orchestra.
    Works by Luigi Russolo (1885- 1947). see
    for article on both Russolo and Varèse.

  • Edgard Varèse - Octandre

    6:48

    Edgard Varèse (1883 - 1965) - Octandre (1923)

    I. Assez lent [0:00]
    II. Très vif et nerveux [2:35]
    III. Grave-Animé et jubilatoire [4:20]

    ASKO Ensemble, Riccardo Chailly (1997)

    Varèse's Octandre is a chamber work scored for 7 woodwinds and double bass and is in three movements, with performances typically lasting around 7 minutes.

    Varèse often insisted that music is both a science and an art. With his ingeniously inventive orchestration in mind, through which he put many sounds into the world that had never existed before, perhaps he should have summed it up as ‘alchemy’; he certainly did love the symbolism of arcane religions. Octandre is a brilliant, purely technical study of the inexplicable abracadabra of sound that Carlos Chávez rightly called gold. With this accomplishment, Varèse moved significantly closer to his ideal of a purely material music of ‘spatial projection.’ But although Octandre could be by no other composer, it is unlike Varèse's other works in a couple of significant ways. The piece is in three movements, labeled according to tempo -- Assez lent, Très vif et nerveux, Grave-Animé et jubilatoire. Each opens with a different instrument to announce its particular character -- oboe, piccolo, and bassoon -- and is essentially a revisitation of the same structural concepts from a unique angle. More significant, however, is the absence of percussion, which usually forms the very core of his sound. Anyone familiar with his other pieces so feels the absence that their ears prick up every couple of beats expecting percussion noise, as if the violent drums are only waiting in ambush. By the time of Octandre, 1923, he'd already composed several pieces -- Amériques, Offrandes, Hyperprism -- that extensively used percussion. Sonic researcher that he was, he perhaps wanted to test his ability to work without his favorite tools and so, deliberately limited himself. He knew such an exercise could only increase his knowledge and bring him that much closer to realizing the mysterious, unheard-of music of his waking visions. And so it did. Varèse did not, however, abandon his usual aesthetic in Octandre: the winds, brass, and double bass are conspicuously made to fill in, against their instrumental natures, for the absent percussion. They're often used only to articulate nervous rhythmic motifs that unexpectedly accumulate from solo passages into massive, weapon-like pounding in shattering, prismatic colors. Wherever somewhat extraneous melodic lines surface, usually in lonely solo passages, they get pureed before long in the blades of emphatic rhythm, especially in the clamor of the shimmering brass that comes in like the attacking sword of an imaginary sun god.

    (source: AllMusic)

    Original audio:

  • Edgard Varèse-Hyperprism

    5:34

  • Edgard Varèse, Ionisation

    5:29

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965): Ionisation (1929/1931) - Juilliard Percussion Orchestra diretta da Frederick Waldman (sotto la supervisione dell'Autore, 1950)
    Photo by Guy Vivien

  • Edgard Varèse, Octandre

    6:40

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Octandre
    I Assez lent
    II Très vif et nerveux
    III Grave - Animé ed jubilatoire

    Ensamble Intercontemporain
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Varèse - Tuning Up

    5:11

    Edgard Varèse [1883 - 1965] - Tuning Up [1946], completed by Chou Wen-chung, 1998

    Ironically, the story of Tuning Up sums up in a nutshell that of Varèse’s life-long failure to gain support for his vision, therefore wasting so much of his creativity. The 1947 film, Carnegie Hall, produce by Boris Morros, featured many musicians, such as Leopold Stokowski, Bruno Walter, and Fritz Reiner. Varèse had long known Morros through Walter Anderson, a loyal advocate for Varèse and the editor of The Commonweal, who published Varèse’s seminal essay, “Organized Sound for the Sound Film,” in 1940. Morros, however, failed in the 1930’s to support Varèse in gaining use of the sound studios in Hollywood for his acoustic experiments. While Carnegie Hall was in production in 1946, Morros persuaded Varèse, through Anderson, to compose a couple of minutes of music parodying the orchestra’s pre-concert tuning up, to be played by the New York Philharmonic with Stokowski. Varèse evidently took the request seriously, whereas Morros wanted slapstick and abandoned the idea. It was said that Varèse was paid a large sum, but that he rejected the cheque in a fury upon hearing his music distorted at rehearsal. The truth was that Varèse had, without discussing a fee, worked hastily on the piece, and that no rehearsals had ever taken place. Besides, no score or parts exist.

    What Varèse kept of this venture are two short drafts of about one-and-a-half minutes each, employing quotations from his own music (as well as a few fleeting suggestions of other familiar music). The drafts appear to be revisions of an earlier version, with parts of manuscript pages and photocopies pasted over each other. The quotations, ranging from a single percussion figure to a few measures, are taken from Amériques, Arcana, Ionisation, and Intégrales, and are often modified or juxtaposed with new material. To create a complete edition of Tuning Up for performance, the first decision was whether it would make sense for the two drafts to be played successively. At the end of one of the drafts, following a statement on the pitch A in six octaves, there are two additional measures (mm. 36, 37) of soft and isolated sounds of A-related pitches that call to mind the final and penultimate endings of Déserts, which suggest openness and the expectation for continuation (perhaps suggesting the endless expanse of a desert).
    (

    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
    Riccardo Chailly, conductor

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  • Edgard Varèse, Ionisation

    5:59

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Ionisation
    New York Philharmonic
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Edgard Varèse Un grand sommeil noir

    2:51

    Edgard Varèse (22 de diciembre de 1883, París, Francia - 6 de noviembre de 1965, Nueva York, Nueva York, Estados Unidos).

    Un grand sommeil noir

    Mireille Delunsch, soprano.
    Francois Kerdoncuff, piano.

  • Edgar Varèse, Density 21.5, Gertrude Greene

    4:55

    Edgar Varèse, Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (1883- 1965), Density 21.5,
    Rene Le Roy, flute solo.
    Works by Gertrude Greene (1904- 1956).

  • Edgard Varèse, Intégrales

    10:35

    Edgard Varèse (1883-1965)
    Intégrales
    Ensamble Intercontemporain
    Conductor: Pierre Boulez

  • Edgar Varèse, Octandre, Gertrude Greene

    8:00

    Edgar Varèse, Edgard Victor Achille Charles Varèse (1883- 1965), Octandre,
    New York Wind Ensemble, Frederic Waldman, conducting.
    Works by Gertrude Greene (1904- 1956).

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