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Playlist of Chuck Willis

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  • Chuck Willis---C.C. Rider

    2:33

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  • Chuck Willis - All the Best

    44:10

    TRACKLIST
    01- There's Got to Be a Way 00:11
    02- C: C: Rider 02:23
    03- Hang Up My Rock & Roll Shoes 04:51
    04- It Ain't Right To Treat Me Wrong 07:07
    05- That Train Has Gone 09:54
    06- What Am I Living For 12:45
    07- You're Still My Baby 15:13
    08- Caldonia 18:22
    09- Give And Take 20:42
    10- My Story 23:42
    11- Sugar Sugar 26:54
    12- It's Too Late 28:48
    13- Love Me Cherry 31:27
    14- Stop and Think 33:46
    15- Going to the River 36:38
    16- Ease The Pain 39:33
    17- You'll Be My Love 41:59


    Cuck Willis - All the Best (FULL ALBUM)
    Download on Google Play:



    Harold Chuck Willis (January 31, 1926[1] – April 10, 1958) was an American blues, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll singer and songwriter. His biggest hits, C. C. Rider (1957) and What Am I Living For (1958), both reached No.1 on the Billboard R&B chart. He was known as The King of the Stroll for his performance of the 1950s dance the stroll.


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  • What Am I Living For

    2:27

    Provided to YouTube by Rhino Atlantic

    What Am I Living For · Chuck Willis

    I Remember Chuck Willis

    ℗ 1963 Atlantic Recording Corporation

    Producer: Ahmet Ertegun
    Guitar: Al Caiola
    Guitar: George Barnes
    Producer: Jerry Wexler
    Tenor Saxophone: King Curtis
    Bass Guitar: Lloyd Trotman
    Conductor: Reggie Obrecht
    Piano: Sam Price
    Band Member: Teddy Charles
    Vocals: Willis Chuck
    Writer: Harris
    Writer: Jay
    Arranger: Reggie Obrecht

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • CHUCK WILLIS What Am I Living For MAR 58

    2:28

    #9 Pop #1 RnB

  • x
  • Its Too Late - Chuck Willis 1956

    2:39

  • Chuck Willis :::: Betty And Dupree.

    2:33

    Harold Chuck Willis (January 31, 1928 -- April 10, 1958) was an American blues, rhythm and blues and rock and roll singer and songwriter. His biggest hits, C. C. Rider (1957) and What Am I Living For (1958), both reached no. 1 in the Billboard R&B chart. He was known as The King of the Stroll for his performance of the 1950s dance The Stroll.

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  • Juanita By Chuck Willis

    2:48

    Chuck Willis was a R&B and R&R songwriter and singer who became a major influence in the mid 50s. Major hits include his best known, C. C. Rider ('57) and What Am I Living For ('58), both reaching #1. The smooth beat of C. C. Rider inspired the dance known as The Stroll. He owned 54 of his signature turbans for use onstage, and became known as The King Of Stroll. What Am I Living For? sold over 1 million copies, was awarded a gold disc, and was the top R&B disc of 1958. This selection hit the Billboard charts in 1958, reaching #9 on the Pops chart and #1 on R&B. Willis died suddenly of peritonitis shortly after release of this song.

  • 1956 Chuck Willis - It’s Too Late

    2:35

    One of Chuck’s seven top-10 R&B hits prior to his 1957 mainstream breakthrough with “C. C. Rider.”

    Billboard R&B Chart Peaks: 3 (radio play), 5 (sales), 8 (juke box play)

    The original single was issued on Atlantic 1098 - It’s Too Late (Willis) by Chuck Willis and his Band, with The Cookies, orchestra conducted by Jesse Stone

  • Hang up My Rock and Roll Shoes

    2:20

    Provided to YouTube by Rhino Atlantic

    Hang up My Rock and Roll Shoes · Chuck Willis

    I Remember Chuck Willis

    ℗ 1958 Atlantic Recording Corporation

    Producer: Ahmet Ertegun
    Guitar: Al Caiola
    Guitar: George Barnes
    Producer: Jerry Wexler
    Drums: Joe Marshall
    Tenor Saxophone: King Curtis
    Bass Guitar: Lloyd Trotman
    Piano: Sam Price
    Band Member: Teddy Charles
    Vocals: Willis Chuck
    Arranger: Reggie Obrecht
    Composer: Willis
    Writer: Willis Chuck

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

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  • Chuck Willis - Betty and Dupree

    2:43

    There were two distinct sides to Chuck Willis. In addition to being a convincing blues shouter, the Atlanta-born Willis harbored a vulnerable blues balladeer side. In addition, he was a masterful songwriter who penned some of the most distinctive R&B numbers of the 1950s. He can't be granted principal credit for his 1957 smash adaptation of C.C. Rider, an irresistible update of a classic folk-blues, but Willis did write such gems as I Feel So Bad (later covered by Elvis Presley, Little Milton, and Otis Rush), the anguished ballads Don't Deceive Me (Please Don't Go) and It's Too Late (the latter attracting covers by Buddy Holly, Charlie Rich, and Otis Redding) and his swan song, Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Harold Willis (he adopted Chuck as a stage handle) received his early training singing at YMCA-sponsored Teenage Canteens in Atlanta and fronting the combos of local bandleaders Roy Mays and Red McAllister. Powerful DJ Zenas Daddy Sears took an interest in the young vocalist's career, hooking him up with Columbia Records in 1951. After a solitary single for the major firm, Willis was shuttled over to its recently reactivated OKeh R&B subsidiary. In 1952, he crashed the national R&B lists for OKeh with a typically plaintive ballad, My Story, swiftly encoring on the hit parade with a gentle cover of Fats Domino's Goin' to the River and his own Don't Deceive Me the next year and You're Still My Baby and the surging Latin-beat I Feel So Bad in 1954. Willis also penned a heart-tugging chart-topper for Ruth Brown that year, Oh What a Dream. Willis moved over to Atlantic Records in 1956 and immediately enjoyed another round of hits with It's Too Late and Juanita. Atlantic strove mightily to cross Willis over into pop territory, inserting an exotic steel guitar at one session and chirpy choirs on several more. The strategy eventually worked when his 1957 revival of the ancient C.C. Rider proved the perfect number to do the Stroll to; American Bandstand gave the track a big push, and Willis had his first R&B number one hit as well as a huge pop seller (Gene Daddy G Barge's magnificent sax solo likely aided its ascent). Barge returned for Willis's similar follow-up, Betty and Dupree, which also did well for him. But the turban-wearing crooner's time was growing short -- he had long suffered from ulcers prior to his 1958 death from peritonitis. Much has been made of the ironic title of his last hit, the touching What Am I Living For, but it was no more a clue to his impending demise than its flip, the joyous Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Both tracks became massive hits upon the singer's death, and his posthumous roll continued with My Life and a powerful Keep A-Driving later that year. ~ Bill Dahl, Rovi

    PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads among multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK:

  • Chuck Willis - Sugar Sugar

    1:54

    1956

  • 1st RECORDING OF: I Feel So Bad - Chuck Willis

    2:53

    Prior to his mainstream hits “C. C. Rider” and “What Am I Living For” later in the decade, Chuck had placed seven releases into the top 10 of Billboard’s R&B charts. This one reached #8 in the summer of ’54, seven years before the top-5 pop version by Elvis

    The original 45rpm single was issued on OKeh 7029 - I Feel So Bad (Willis) by Chuck Willis, recorded September 17, 1953

    For hundreds of other ‘originals,’ please visit the fascinating playlist “FIRST RECORDING OF THE SONG…” (click here: )

  • CHUCK WILLIS Whats Your Name 1953

    2:33

    An outstanding song writer!
    Another great Willis hit......

  • Chuck Willis - Its too late

    2:41

    The best R&B classics

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  • CHUCK WILLIS C C Rider Mar 57

    2:41

    #12 Pop #1 RnB

  • Chuck WIllis - Keep A Drivin

    2:20

    There were two distinct sides to Chuck Willis. In addition to being a convincing blues shouter, the Atlanta-born Willis harbored a vulnerable blues balladeer side. In addition, he was a masterful songwriter who penned some of the most distinctive R&B numbers of the 1950s. He can't be granted principal credit for his 1957 smash adaptation of C.C. Rider, an irresistible update of a classic folk-blues, but Willis did write such gems as I Feel So Bad (later covered by Elvis Presley, Little Milton, and Otis Rush), the anguished ballads Don't Deceive Me (Please Don't Go) and It's Too Late (the latter attracting covers by Buddy Holly, Charlie Rich, and Otis Redding) and his swan song, Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Harold Willis (he adopted Chuck as a stage handle) received his early training singing at YMCA-sponsored Teenage Canteens in Atlanta and fronting the combos of local bandleaders Roy Mays and Red McAllister. Powerful DJ Zenas Daddy Sears took an interest in the young vocalist's career, hooking him up with Columbia Records in 1951. After a solitary single for the major firm, Willis was shuttled over to its recently reactivated OKeh R&B subsidiary. In 1952, he crashed the national R&B lists for OKeh with a typically plaintive ballad, My Story, swiftly encoring on the hit parade with a gentle cover of Fats Domino's Goin' to the River and his own Don't Deceive Me the next year and You're Still My Baby and the surging Latin-beat I Feel So Bad in 1954. Willis also penned a heart-tugging chart-topper for Ruth Brown that year, Oh What a Dream. Willis moved over to Atlantic Records in 1956 and immediately enjoyed another round of hits with It's Too Late and Juanita. Atlantic strove mightily to cross Willis over into pop territory, inserting an exotic steel guitar at one session and chirpy choirs on several more. The strategy eventually worked when his 1957 revival of the ancient C.C. Rider proved the perfect number to do the Stroll to; American Bandstand gave the track a big push, and Willis had his first R&B number one hit as well as a huge pop seller (Gene Daddy G Barge's magnificent sax solo likely aided its ascent). Barge returned for Willis's similar follow-up, Betty and Dupree, which also did well for him. But the turban-wearing crooner's time was growing short -- he had long suffered from ulcers prior to his 1958 death from peritonitis. Much has been made of the ironic title of his last hit, the touching What Am I Living For, but it was no more a clue to his impending demise than its flip, the joyous Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Both tracks became massive hits upon the singer's death, and his posthumous roll continued with My Life and a powerful Keep A-Driving later that year. ~ Bill Dahl, Rovi

    PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads among multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK:

  • What Am I Living For ~ Chuck Willis

    2:28

    Harold Chuck Willis was an American blues, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll singer and songwriter. His biggest hits, C. C. Rider and What Am I Living For , both reached No.1 on the Billboard R&B chart. He was known as The King of the Stroll for his performance of the 1950s dance The Stroll.

  • Chuck Willis - Whatcha Gonna Do When Your Baby Leaves You

    3:01

    4 All the music lovers!!!

  • CHUCK WILLIS & GROUP MY LIFE

    2:43

  • Chuck Willis-Its Too Late LIVE

    2:36

    Rock and Roll dance party - Alan Freed's Rock'n'Roll radio - Classic live performance from the golden age of Rock'n'Roll

  • x
  • Chuck Willis - Its too late

    2:35

    It was written by Chuck Willis and released as a single in 1956.
    Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act of 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purpose such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.No copyright infringements were intended in achieving this video.The similarities and music used belong to the original owners.This video for entertainment purposes only and has no cash value.

  • Chuck Willis - C. C. Rider

    2:30

    There were two distinct sides to Chuck Willis. In addition to being a convincing blues shouter, the Atlanta-born Willis harbored a vulnerable blues balladeer side. In addition, he was a masterful songwriter who penned some of the most distinctive R&B numbers of the 1950s. He can't be granted principal credit for his 1957 smash adaptation of C.C. Rider, an irresistible update of a classic folk-blues, but Willis did write such gems as I Feel So Bad (later covered by Elvis Presley, Little Milton, and Otis Rush), the anguished ballads Don't Deceive Me (Please Don't Go) and It's Too Late (the latter attracting covers by Buddy Holly, Charlie Rich, and Otis Redding) and his swan song, Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Harold Willis (he adopted Chuck as a stage handle) received his early training singing at YMCA-sponsored Teenage Canteens in Atlanta and fronting the combos of local bandleaders Roy Mays and Red McAllister. Powerful DJ Zenas Daddy Sears took an interest in the young vocalist's career, hooking him up with Columbia Records in 1951. After a solitary single for the major firm, Willis was shuttled over to its recently reactivated OKeh R&B subsidiary. In 1952, he crashed the national R&B lists for OKeh with a typically plaintive ballad, My Story, swiftly encoring on the hit parade with a gentle cover of Fats Domino's Goin' to the River and his own Don't Deceive Me the next year and You're Still My Baby and the surging Latin-beat I Feel So Bad in 1954. Willis also penned a heart-tugging chart-topper for Ruth Brown that year, Oh What a Dream. Willis moved over to Atlantic Records in 1956 and immediately enjoyed another round of hits with It's Too Late and Juanita. Atlantic strove mightily to cross Willis over into pop territory, inserting an exotic steel guitar at one session and chirpy choirs on several more. The strategy eventually worked when his 1957 revival of the ancient C.C. Rider proved the perfect number to do the Stroll to; American Bandstand gave the track a big push, and Willis had his first R&B number one hit as well as a huge pop seller (Gene Daddy G Barge's magnificent sax solo likely aided its ascent). Barge returned for Willis's similar follow-up, Betty and Dupree, which also did well for him. But the turban-wearing crooner's time was growing short -- he had long suffered from ulcers prior to his 1958 death from peritonitis. Much has been made of the ironic title of his last hit, the touching What Am I Living For, but it was no more a clue to his impending demise than its flip, the joyous Hang Up My Rock and Roll Shoes. Both tracks became massive hits upon the singer's death, and his posthumous roll continued with My Life and a powerful Keep A-Driving later that year. ~ Bill Dahl, Rovi

    PLEASE NOTE: I divided my uploads among multiple channels, Bookmark this link in your browser for instant access to an index with links to all of John1948's oldies classics. LINK:

  • CHUCK WILLIS & GROUP- THUNDER & LIGHTNING

    2:37

  • Betty and Dupree

    2:27

    Provided to YouTube by Rhino Atlantic

    Betty and Dupree · Chuck Willis

    I Remember Chuck Willis

    ℗ 1963 Atlantic Recording Corporation

    Producer: Ahmet Ertegun
    Guitar: Al Caiola
    Xylophone: Harry Breuer
    Producer: Jerry Wexler
    Conductor: Jesse Stone
    Drums: Joe Marshall
    Guitar: Kenny Burrell
    Bass Guitar: Lloyd Trotman
    Piano: Mike Stoller
    Vocals: Willis Chuck
    Arranger: Jesse Stone
    Writer: Willis Chuck

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Chuck Willis - C. C. Rider

    2:28

    C. C. Rider by Chuck Willis from the album Harlem Street Stroll
    Released 2017-04-27 on Not Now Music
    Download on iTunes:
    Download on Google Play:

    Harlem became one of America’s greatest show-places, providing some of the greatest music ever to emanate from the USA. And away from those main stages, unlimited juke-boxes provided a galaxy of R&B sounds all contributing to the evolution of one of the world's most remarkable entertainment-fuelled locations. This compilation includes some of the most representative artists from the area, such as Bo Diddley, Buster Brown, Earl Hooker and many more.
    © 2017 Not Now Music
    ℗ 2017 Not Now Music

  • Chuck Willis Ease The Pain Atlantic Records 78 1130 1957

    2:26

    Chuck Willis-Ease The Pain Atlantic Records-78-1130-1957

  • Chuck Willis - Betty & Dupree.wmv

    2:24

    Here's Chuck Willis telling the story of Betty & Dupree. Enjoy!

  • What Am I Living For ~ Chuck Willis

    2:43

  • Willis, Chuck - Ease The Pain - 1957

    2:26

    Harold Willis (he adopted Chuck as a stage handle) received his early training singing at YMCA-sponsored Teenage Canteens in Atlanta and fronting the combos of local bandleaders Roy Mays and Red McAllister.

  • CHUCK WILLIS - C.C. RIDER

    2:36

    PRESENTING THE SOLID GOLD SOUL REVUE! SHAKE A TAIL FEATHER WITH 60 HOT HITS FROM THE BIGGEST NAMES IN SOUL, POP AND R&B.

  • C C RIDER by Chuck Willis on Atlantic label 78 rpm record

    2:27

    C C RIDER by Chuck Willis on Atlantic label 78 rpm record. The copyright folks have blocked this video in the U.S. Too bad for them, good for the rest of the world. Enjoy!

  • Chuck Willis - What Am I Living For

    2:27

    Chuck Willis - What Am I Living For

  • Chuck Willis - What Am I Living For Vinyl

    2:25

    * Mono to STEREO !

  • Chuck Willis - Loud Mouth Lucy

    2:14

    ✔ Subscribe →
    ♫ Listen to full album →

  • I Rule My House-Chuck Willis

    3:42

    Chuck Willis (b.1928 d.1958) King of the Stroll one of R&B's greatest singer songwriters. He had many hit records through the 1950's, and others had hits with his songs also. C. C. Rider became a huge cross over hit in 1957 and sound track for the dance crazy 'The Stroll'. After emergency surgery for bleeding ulcers he died of peritonitis. I Rule My House is from 1952 and what a rocker it is! My theme song, RIGHT!
    Hit HQ to read final ad.

  • Chuck Willis - Search My Heart

    2:19

    This is a good 'un from Chuck Willis!!! Enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Chuck Willis - My Crying Eyes - Atlantic 1168

    2:40

    Dj MichelSoul Popcorn Oldies
    Chuck Willis - My Crying Eyes - Atlantic 1168
    Original Vinyl

  • CHUCK WILLIS THAT TRAIN HAS GONE

    2:51

    From Atlantic EP 609, 1958. By request from Frank Baltazar

  • Chuck Willis - Hang up my rock and roll shoes

    2:21

    Chuck Willis - Hang up my rock and roll shoes

    Iscriviti al canale:
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    #R&B
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  • Chuck Willis on Atlantic EP591

    2:59

    ''Watcha' Gonna Do When Your Baby Leaves You'' issued on an extended playing Atlantic 45 in 1956 .

    Playlist:
    1a. Juanita
    1b. Watcha' Gonna Do When Your Baby Leaves You
    2a. Kansas City Woman
    2b. It's Too Late

  • Chuck Willis - It Aint Right to Treat Me Wrong

    2:47

    ✔ Subscribe →
    ♫ Listen to full album →

  • Chuck Willis-Keep A Knockin

    2:13

    great song by the man who was best known for CC Rider! enjoy

  • Chuck Willis - Search My Heart

    2:15

  • Chuck Willis ~ Its Too Late - 45rpm 1956

    2:41

    Chuck Willis It's Too Late - 45rpm 1956 - I hope you ENJOY!!!
    Harold Chuck Willis (January 31, 1928 -- April 10, 1958) was an American blues, rhythm and blues, and rock and roll singer and songwriter. His biggest hits, C. C. Rider (1957) and What Am I Living For (1958), both reached No.1 on the Billboard R&B chart. He was known as The King of the Stroll for his performance of the 1950s dance The Stroll.
    Willis was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Willis was spotted at a talent contest by Atlanta radio disc jockey Zenas Sears, who became his manager and helped him to sign with Columbia Records in 1951. After one single, Willis began recording on a Columbia subsidiary, Okeh. During his stay at Okeh, he established himself as a popular R&B singer and songwriter. In 1956, he moved to Atlantic Records where he had immediate success with It's Too Late (She's Gone), Juanita and Love Me Cherry. His most successful recording was C.C. Rider, which topped the US Billboard R&B chart in 1957 and also crossed over and sold well in the pop market. C.C. Rider was a remake of a twelve-bar blues, performed by Ma Rainey in Atlanta before Willis was born. Its relaxed beat, combined with a mellow vibraphone backing and chorus, inspired the emergence of the popular dance, The Stroll. Willis's follow-up was Betty and Dupree, another stroll song, which also did well. Willis' single Going to the River, a song by Fats Domino, was a prototype for his stroll sound, reaching No.4 on the R&B chart.

  • Chuck Willis – “Love Me Cherry” 1957

    2:18

    Written by Chuck Willis

    Billed as the “King Of The Stroll”, Chuck Willis was one of the many talented artists recording for Atlantic in the 1950s. He moved to the label from Okeh in 1956. The following year, he reached #12 with his version of “C C Rider”.

    “Love Me Cherry” was the flips side of the follow-up to “C C Rider”, “That Train Has Done”. Both sides of this disc are delivered in Chuck’s unmistakable blues style.

    Sadly, Chuck passed in 1958 at the all-too-early age of 30 but not without leaving us with a Top-10 record, “What Am I Living For”.

    Another reminder of what a great job UK Decca’s London subsidiary did for rock and roll in the UK in the 50s/early 60s. This recording by Chuck Willis didn’t make the Hot-100 but it still found an outlet in the UK.

  • Chuck Willis I Feel So Bad

    2:56

    .

  • 1956 Chuck Willis - Whatcha’ Gonna Do When Your Baby Leaves You

    2:45

    The primary melody and lyric was later used by Ronnie Hawkins in his 1959 single “Southern Love”

    Billboard R&B Chart Peak: 11 (sales)

    The original single was issued on Atlantic 1112 - Whatcha’ Gonna Do When Your Baby Leaves You (Willis) by Chuck Willis, orchestra conducted by Jesse Stone

  • Chuck WIllis-Keep A Drivin

    2:26

    I do not claim any rights to the material posted. it's for historical purposes only!

  • CHUCK WILLIS - HANG UP MY R N R SHOES - WHAT AM I LIVING FOR - ATLANTIC 45 1179

    4:56

    CHUCK WILLIS - HANG UP MY R N R SHOES - WHAT AM I LIVING FOR - ATLANTIC 45-1179

  • CHUCK WILLIS That Train Has Gone 78 1958

    2:53

    Watching the caboose as she moves away......
    Here's my second-most popular upload, and by Chuck. You may be surprised.....

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