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Playlist of Alexander von Zemlinsky

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  • Alexander von Zemlinsky: The Mermaid, fantasy for orchestra after Andersen

    47:50

    Critical version by Antony Beaumont; Storgårds, Helsingin kaupunginorkesteri

    Sehr mässig bewegt • 15:48 Sehr bewegt, rauschend • 33:04 Sehr gedehnt, mit schmerzvollem Ausdruck

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau

    8:25

    Alexander Zemlinsky was life's punching bag. After initial successes that pointed to an accomplished career for the young Zemlinsky - a prize-winning first opera, a second opera accepted by Gustav Mahler for the Vienna Court Opera, and a star pupil in the person of Arnold Schoenberg - things started to go wrong. A failed love-affair turned him into a laughing-stock, a miscalculated refusal of a post at the Berlin Opera didn't help his career (it was the same post Strauss had held), and the rise of the Nazis forced him into exile, first in Switzerland, and then in New York. The Mermaid was the first in a series of musical attempts to grapple with the demons of defeat - his opera Der Traumgörge (Goerge the Dreamer) and Der Zwerg (The Dwarf), both rife with autobiographical elements, were part of this process. Together, they are works that, in their bittersweet lyricism and moments of defiant exuberance, provide ample proof that no matter what life dealt him, Zemlinsky never lost confidence in his gifts as a composer.

    We have a failed love affair to thank for The Mermaid. Zemlinsky met Alma Schindler at a dinner party in February 1900 and was immediately captivated by her glamour and brilliance; her admission that Tristan und Isolde was her favorite opera was the icing on the cake. Her initial impression of him was slightly less rapt - she described him as chinless, small, with bulging eyes and as dreadfully ugly - but she began going to him for lessons anyway. After pursuing her for nearly two years, Zemlinsky was rejected by Alma, who had decided instead to marry Gustav Mahler, the composer-conductor who was director of the Vienna Court Opera at the time.

    As Antony Beaumont has pointed out in his study of Zemlinsky, the composer wrote The Mermaid as part of a psychological process meant to exorcise the trauma of Alma's marriage to Mahler. Zemlinsky turned to Hans Christian Andersen's mermaid story because of its resonance with his own situation at the time. In Andersen's story, a Mermaid saves a Prince from drowning and falls in love with him in the process. She goes to the Mer-witch, who, in exchange for her voice (the Witch cuts out the Mermaid's tongue), makes her human. But the bargain is perilous, for if the Mermaid fails to win the Prince, she will die. When the Prince marries another, the Mermaid's sisters go to the Mer-witch to try and save her. The Witch says that the Mermaid must kill the Prince, but she cannot bring herself to do it. Heartbroken, she plunges into the sea, but, instead of dying, is transformed into a Daughter of the Air and given another chance to regain her immortal soul. According to Beaumont, the composer saw himself as the Mermaid, with Alma as the Prince. In his musical setting of Andersen's tale, Zemlinsky was able to express his pain.

    The Mermaid opens with a musical depiction of the first lines of Andersen's tale: Far out in the ocean, where the water is as blue as the prettiest cornflower, and as clear as crystal, it is very, very deep; so deep, indeed, that no cable could fathom it. Many church steeples, piled one upon another, would not reach from the ground beneath to the surface of the water above. There dwell the Mer-king and his subjects. The movement is the most literal in its adherence to Andersen's narrative. Zemlinsky tells the story musically through a series of motives; an ascending figure depicting the bottom of the ocean, and the Mermaid's theme, introduced by solo violin, are among the motives heard at the outset of the first movement. The middle of the movement, which functions like a development section after the lengthy thematic exposition that precedes it, portrays the turbulent storm during which the Prince falls overboard; just as the music seems poised to reach its climax, we hear a sweet, extremely lyrical version of the Mermaid's theme.

  • x
  • Alexander von Zemlinsky, Symphony No 2 in B flat major

    41:56

    Alexander von Zemlinsky, Symphony No. 2 in B-flat major (1897)

    1. Sostenuto - Allegro (schnell, mit Feuer und Kraft)
    2. Nicht zu schnell (Scherzando)
    3. Adagio
    4. Moderato.

    Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin
    Riccardo Chailly, conductor

  • Zemlinsky: Die Seejungfrau - Chailly / Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra

    41:23

    Alexander von Zemlinsky: Die Seejungfrau, Fantasie für Orchester (The Mermaid, Fantasy for Orchestra)

    I. Sehr mäßig bewegt (00:00)
    II. Sehr bewegt, rauschend (15:44)
    III. Sehr gedehnt, mit schmerzvollem Ausdruck (28:01)

    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
    Riccardo Chailly, conductor

    October 24, 1986
    Grote Zaal, Concertgebouw, Amsterdam

  • x
  • Zemlinsky: Psalm 13, Op.24

    13:43

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Zemlinsky: Psalm 13, Op.24 · Ernst Senff Chamber Choir · Radio-Symphonie-Orchester Berlin · Riccardo Chailly

    Zemlinsky: Die Seejungfrau/Psalms Nos.13 & 23

    ℗ 1987 Decca Music Group Limited

    Released on: 1995-01-01

    Producer: Michael Haas
    Studio Personnel, Balance Engineer: Stanley Goodall
    Composer: Alexander von Zemlinsky

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky, Symfonie nr 1 in D minor

    32:12

    Alexander von Zemlinsky, Symfonie nr. 1 in D minor

    1. Allegro ma non Troppo
    2. Scherzo - Allegro Scherzando
    3. Sehr Innig und Breit
    4. Finale - Moderato

    North German Radio Symphony Orchestra
    Antony Beaumont, conductor

  • x
  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Sinfonietta op.23 - I movement

    9:14

    The Austrian composer and conductor Alexander von Zemlinsky was born in Vienna in 1871. His reputation has to some extent been overshadowed by the controversial and influential achievements of his brother-in-law Arnold Schoenberg, with Alban Berg and Anton Webern, on the one hand, and by those of his older contemporary Gustav Mahler. Zemlinsky continues the tradition of Viennese classicism, the influence of Wagner never leading him to abandon tonality. In some measure he represents a generation of Viennese composers who were able to combine the apparently divergent tendencies of Brahms and Wagner.

    Zemlinsky was trained at the Vienna Conservatory, where he was a composition pupil of Johann Nepomuk Fuchs, himself a pupil of Sechter, who had taught Schubert briefly, and of Bruckner, in the intervals of writing his daily fugue. Always a fine craftsman, Zemlinsky was able to instruct Schoenberg, whom he met in the amateur orchestra Polyhymnia in 1895, in counterpoint, and gave him advice on his earlier work. He was to remain for some time a strong influence both on Schoenberg and on younger composers in Vienna. He also taught Alma Schindler, later the wife of Mahler, who in 1897 became conductor at the Court Opera in Vienna

    Zemlinskys close association with Schoenberg, a relationship strengthened when the latter married Zemlinskys sister Mathilde, brought early collaboration in the opera Sarema, for which Schoenberg assisted with the libretto. Both men were indebted to Mahler for practical encouragement. It was Mahler who presented Zemlinskys second opera Es war einmal at the Court Opera in 1900, and accepted his next opera Der Traumgörge for performance. Later operas included two works based on Oscar Wilde, Eine Florentinische Tragödie, and Der Zwerg, a version of The Birthday of the Infanta.

    In addition to these and other stage works, Zemlinsky wrote songs, chamber music and four symphonies. The last of these, the Lyrische Sinfonie of 1923, using a text from Rabindranath Tagore, was quoted by Berg in his own Lyric Suite, as a sign of respect and affection.

    Zemlinskys career was essentially in opera. In 1899 he became Kapellmeister at the Carltheater in Vienna, and later conducted also at the Volksoper, where he was Kapellmeister from 1906 until 1911, with a break during Mahlers last season, 1907-08, when he conducted at the Court Opera. From 1911 until 1927 he was conductor at the Deutsche Landestheater in Prague, where he employed Schoenbergs pupils Webern, Jalowetz and Karl Horowitz. This period was followed by appointment as Kapellmeister at the Kroll Theatre in Berlin, under Klemperer, and the continuation of his work as a teacher, which he had carried out in Prague, at the Berlin Musikhochschule. At the accession to power of Hitler in 1933, Zemlinsky made his escape to Vienna, and at the Anschluss in 1938 moved first to Prague and then to the United States, where he died in 1942. (naxos.com)

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Clarinet Trio op. 3 With score

    26:51

    -Composer: Alexander von Zemlinsky (14 October 1871 – 15 March 1942)
    -Performers: Wolfgang Meyer (Clarinet), Mischa Meyer (Cello), Markus Hadulla (Piano)

    Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano in d minor, op. 3, written in 1895-96

    00:07 - I. Allegro ma non troppo
    13:14 - II. Andante
    21:31 - III. Allegro

    The Trio for piano, clarinet & cello in D minor, Op. 3, from 1896, of the Austrian composer Alexander von Zemlinsky is a work of conservative Romanticism modeled on Brahms' own trio scored for the same instruments of 1892. Indeed, the closing Allegro in D minor of Zemlinsky's Trio takes its main theme directly from the main theme of the parallel movement in Brahms' Trio. Nor is Brahms the only influence apparent in Zemlinsky's work: the opening Allegro ma no troppo in D minor sounds distinctly Slavic with echoes of Tchaikovsky and Dvorák in its themes and the central Andante's big sentimental tune in D major recalls the gestures of the passionate second theme of the closing movement of Mahler's First Symphony. Despite these imitations, Zemlinsky's Trio is an appealing and well-made work by a minor master of the fin de siècle.
    [allmusic.com]

  • Zemlinsky: La Sirenita - Andrey Boreyko - Sinfónica de Galicia

    50:42

    ALEXANDER VON ZEMLINSKY (1871-1942)
    La Sirenita [Die Seejungfrau]
    I. Sehr Mässig Bewegt (0:15)
    II Sehr Bewegt, Rauschend (17:10)
    III. Sehr Gedehnt, Mit Schmerzvollem Ausdruck (31:05)

    Orquesta Sinfónica de Galicia
    Andrey Boreyko, director

    Grabación realizada en el 9 de noviembre de 2018 en el Palacio de la Ópera de A Coruña.
    Realización de Antonio Cid / RDC Producciones
    Audio de Pablo Barreiro / CRTVG

  • x
  • Alexander von Zemlinsky Maiblumen blühten überall for soprano and string sextet

    9:25

    2019 Jerusalem - Budapest - Reconnection The Art of Chamber Music
    Students from the Liszt Academy, Budapest and from the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance
    Dalia Besprovzani - soprano
    Concert at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance, 20/2/2019, Hall 221

  • Zemlinsky: Sinfonietta ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester ∙ Andrés Orozco-Estrada

    22:02

    I. Sehr lebhaft ∙
    II. Ballade. Sehr gemessen, doch nicht schleppend ∙
    III. Rondo. Sehr lebhaft ∙

    hr-Sinfonieorchester – Frankfurt Radio Symphony ∙
    Andrés Orozco-Estrada, Dirigent ∙

    Alte Oper Frankfurt, 11. Dezember 2015 ∙

    Website: ∙
    Facebook:

  • Alexander Von Zemlinsky - Sinfonietta op 23

    5:37

    Rehersing.....
    Ensemble Accademia del Teatro alla Scala
    Direttore, Renato Rivolta

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Sinfonietta op.23 - III movement

    5:41

    The Austrian composer and conductor Alexander von Zemlinsky was born in Vienna in 1871. His reputation has to some extent been overshadowed by the controversial and influential achievements of his brother-in-law Arnold Schoenberg, with Alban Berg and Anton Webern, on the one hand, and by those of his older contemporary Gustav Mahler. Zemlinsky continues the tradition of Viennese classicism, the influence of Wagner never leading him to abandon tonality. In some measure he represents a generation of Viennese composers who were able to combine the apparently divergent tendencies of Brahms and Wagner.

    Zemlinsky was trained at the Vienna Conservatory, where he was a composition pupil of Johann Nepomuk Fuchs, himself a pupil of Sechter, who had taught Schubert briefly, and of Bruckner, in the intervals of writing his daily fugue. Always a fine craftsman, Zemlinsky was able to instruct Schoenberg, whom he met in the amateur orchestra Polyhymnia in 1895, in counterpoint, and gave him advice on his earlier work. He was to remain for some time a strong influence both on Schoenberg and on younger composers in Vienna. He also taught Alma Schindler, later the wife of Mahler, who in 1897 became conductor at the Court Opera in Vienna

    Zemlinskys close association with Schoenberg, a relationship strengthened when the latter married Zemlinskys sister Mathilde, brought early collaboration in the opera Sarema, for which Schoenberg assisted with the libretto. Both men were indebted to Mahler for practical encouragement. It was Mahler who presented Zemlinskys second opera Es war einmal at the Court Opera in 1900, and accepted his next opera Der Traumgörge for performance. Later operas included two works based on Oscar Wilde, Eine Florentinische Tragödie, and Der Zwerg, a version of The Birthday of the Infanta.

    In addition to these and other stage works, Zemlinsky wrote songs, chamber music and four symphonies. The last of these, the Lyrische Sinfonie of 1923, using a text from Rabindranath Tagore, was quoted by Berg in his own Lyric Suite, as a sign of respect and affection.

    Zemlinskys career was essentially in opera. In 1899 he became Kapellmeister at the Carltheater in Vienna, and later conducted also at the Volksoper, where he was Kapellmeister from 1906 until 1911, with a break during Mahlers last season, 1907-08, when he conducted at the Court Opera. From 1911 until 1927 he was conductor at the Deutsche Landestheater in Prague, where he employed Schoenbergs pupils Webern, Jalowetz and Karl Horowitz. This period was followed by appointment as Kapellmeister at the Kroll Theatre in Berlin, under Klemperer, and the continuation of his work as a teacher, which he had carried out in Prague, at the Berlin Musikhochschule. At the accession to power of Hitler in 1933, Zemlinsky made his escape to Vienna, and at the Anschluss in 1938 moved first to Prague and then to the United States, where he died in 1942. (naxos.com)

  • Zemlinsky: Lyrische Symphonie, Op.18 - 1. Langsam

    10:39

    Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

    Zemlinsky: Lyrische Symphonie, Op.18 - 1. Langsam · Håkan Hagegård · Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra · Riccardo Chailly

    Zemlinsky: Lyric Symphony; Sinfonische Gesänge

    ℗ 1994 Decca Music Group Limited

    Released on: 1994-11-24

    Producer: Andrew Cornall
    Producer: Michael Woolcock
    Studio Personnel, Balance Engineer: Simon Eadon
    Studio Personnel, Balance Engineer: James Lock
    Studio Personnel, Balance Engineer: Colin Moorfoot
    Composer: Alexander von Zemlinsky
    Author: Rabindranath Tagore

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Zemlinsky, Quartet No 4 - Brodsky Quartet

    29:44

    Recorded 3rd Dec 2013 at the Hampstead Arts Festival, London.

    I Praeludium (0:08)
    II Burleske (5:22)
    III Adagietto (10:42)
    IV Intermezzo (14:58)
    V Thema mit Variationen (20:00)
    VI Finale: Doppelfuge (25:46)

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - EINE FLORENTINISCHE TRAGÖDIE, Op.16.

    58:59

    Alexander von Zemlinsky, Eine florentinische Tragödie, Op. 16.
    Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Armin Jordan.
    Iris Vermillon - Victor Lutsiuk - Albert Dohmen.
    HERE IS THE TRANSLATION OF THE LIBRETTO.

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Albumblatt - Silke Avenhaus

    2:46

    Silke Avenhaus, piano
    Rec. 2003

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau

    6:53

    Alexander Zemlinsky was life's punching bag. After initial successes that pointed to an accomplished career for the young Zemlinsky - a prize-winning first opera, a second opera accepted by Gustav Mahler for the Vienna Court Opera, and a star pupil in the person of Arnold Schoenberg - things started to go wrong. A failed love-affair turned him into a laughing-stock, a miscalculated refusal of a post at the Berlin Opera didn't help his career (it was the same post Strauss had held), and the rise of the Nazis forced him into exile, first in Switzerland, and then in New York. The Mermaid was the first in a series of musical attempts to grapple with the demons of defeat - his opera Der Traumgörge (Goerge the Dreamer) and Der Zwerg (The Dwarf), both rife with autobiographical elements, were part of this process. Together, they are works that, in their bittersweet lyricism and moments of defiant exuberance, provide ample proof that no matter what life dealt him, Zemlinsky never lost confidence in his gifts as a composer.

    We have a failed love affair to thank for The Mermaid. Zemlinsky met Alma Schindler at a dinner party in February 1900 and was immediately captivated by her glamour and brilliance; her admission that Tristan und Isolde was her favorite opera was the icing on the cake. Her initial impression of him was slightly less rapt - she described him as chinless, small, with bulging eyes and as dreadfully ugly - but she began going to him for lessons anyway. After pursuing her for nearly two years, Zemlinsky was rejected by Alma, who had decided instead to marry Gustav Mahler, the composer-conductor who was director of the Vienna Court Opera at the time.

    As Antony Beaumont has pointed out in his study of Zemlinsky, the composer wrote The Mermaid as part of a psychological process meant to exorcise the trauma of Alma's marriage to Mahler. Zemlinsky turned to Hans Christian Andersen's mermaid story because of its resonance with his own situation at the time. In Andersen's story, a Mermaid saves a Prince from drowning and falls in love with him in the process. She goes to the Mer-witch, who, in exchange for her voice (the Witch cuts out the Mermaid's tongue), makes her human. But the bargain is perilous, for if the Mermaid fails to win the Prince, she will die. When the Prince marries another, the Mermaid's sisters go to the Mer-witch to try and save her. The Witch says that the Mermaid must kill the Prince, but she cannot bring herself to do it. Heartbroken, she plunges into the sea, but, instead of dying, is transformed into a Daughter of the Air and given another chance to regain her immortal soul. According to Beaumont, the composer saw himself as the Mermaid, with Alma as the Prince. In his musical setting of Andersen's tale, Zemlinsky was able to express his pain.

    The Mermaid opens with a musical depiction of the first lines of Andersen's tale: Far out in the ocean, where the water is as blue as the prettiest cornflower, and as clear as crystal, it is very, very deep; so deep, indeed, that no cable could fathom it. Many church steeples, piled one upon another, would not reach from the ground beneath to the surface of the water above. There dwell the Mer-king and his subjects. The movement is the most literal in its adherence to Andersen's narrative. Zemlinsky tells the story musically through a series of motives; an ascending figure depicting the bottom of the ocean, and the Mermaid's theme, introduced by solo violin, are among the motives heard at the outset of the first movement. The middle of the movement, which functions like a development section after the lengthy thematic exposition that precedes it, portrays the turbulent storm during which the Prince falls overboard; just as the music seems poised to reach its climax, we hear a sweet, extremely lyrical version of the Mermaid's theme.

  • FRÜHLINGSERWACHEN - NUN MUSS SICH ALLES, ALLES WENDEN - ALEXANDER VON ZEMLINSKY

    11:57

    Ludwig Uhland
    [1787-1862]

    Frühlingsglaube

    Die linden Lüfte sind erwacht,
    Sie säuseln und weben Tag und Nacht,
    Sie schaffen an allen Enden.
    O frischer Duft, o neuer Klang!
    Nun, armes Herze, sei nicht bang!
    Nun muß sich alles, alles wenden.

    Die Welt wird schöner mit jedem Tag,
    Man weiß nicht, was noch werden mag,
    Das Blühen will nicht enden.
    Es blüht das fernste, tiefste Tal:
    Nun, armes Herz, vergiß der Qual!
    Nun muß sich alles, alles wenden.


    Heinrich Heine
    [1797-1856]

    Minnegruß

    Die du bist so schön und rein,
    Wunnevolles Magedein,
    Deinem Dienste ganz allein
    Möcht ich wohl mein Leben weihn

    Deine süßen Äugelein
    Glänzen mild wie Mondesschein;
    Helle Rosenlichter streun
    Deine roten Wängelein.

    Und aus deinem Mündchen klein
    Blinkts hervor wie Perlenreihn;
    Doch den schönsten Edelstein
    Hegt dein stiller Busenschrein.

    Fromme Minne mag es sein,
    Was mir drang ins Herz hinein,
    Als ich weiland schaute dein,
    Wunnevolles Magedein!


    Paul Heyse
    [1830-1914]

    Frühlingsbegräbnis

    Stumm in Wehmut schaut der Mond herab,
    und es schluchzen alle Nachtigallen.
    Wo er oftmals seine Feste gab,
    senkt man ihn herab,
    und die bleichen Silberflöre wallen.


    by berlinzerberus

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky

    7:34

    Alexander von Zemlinsky (1871-1942) (Austria)
    « A Dance Poem » in one act, part I : Feierlich (1901)
    Dir : James Conlon

    Pour qui voudrait s'initier à la musique de la première école de Vienne, qui fit connaître notamment Richard Strauss et Joseph Marx, la première partie « Feierlich/Solennellement » du « Poème Dansé en un acte » (1901-1904) d'Alexander von Zemlinsky serait une bonne introduction. On trouve dans ce court mouvement la science orchestrale si caractéristique de cette école, mise au service d'un romantisme qui unit le grandiose au bucolique. Zemlinsky, qui aida son beau-frère Arnold Schönberg à se faire connaître en Autriche, dut fuir durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale aux Etats-Unis où son opulente musique n'eut hélas guère l'occasion de s'exprimer.

    LIST OF UPLOADS OF COLLECTIONCB, COLLECTIONCB2, COLLECTIONCB3, COLLECTIONCB4
    and
    IDEAL DISCOTHEQUE OF MORE THAN 1,500 ORCHESTRAL WORKS OF FEELINGS :

  • x
  • Alexander von Zemlinsky: DER ZWERG Official trailer

    2:17

    Premiere on 24 March 2019 at Deutsche Oper Berlin

    Conductor: Donald Runnicles; Director: Tobias Kratzer; Stage design, Costume design: Rainer Sellmaier; Chorus Master: Jeremy Bines; Light: Stefan Woinke;

    With Elena Tsallagova, Emily Magee, David Butt Philip, Mick Morris Mehnert, Philipp Jekal, Flurina Stucki, Amber Fasquelle, Maiju Vaahtoluoto, So Young Park, Kristina Häger, Adelle Eslinger-Runnicles, Evgeny Nikiforov, Chorus and Orchestra of Deutschen Oper Berlin

    It’s Princess Donna Clara’s 18th birthday and she’s getting showered with presents from all sides, but one gift in particular, from the Turkish Sultan, stands out from the crowd: a real-life dwarf! Amidst all the splendour and beauty the misshapen man attracts her special attention, charming her with his singing and fascinating her all the more for seeming to be blissfully unaware of his physical appearance. The dwarf falls madly in love with the princess and is blind to the coquettish game that she is playing. But then he comes face-to-face with his reflection for the first time in his life. Realising the truth of his situation, he falls down dead. Alexander Zemlinsky’s THE DWARF is based on Oscar Wilde’s fairy tale “The Birthday of the Infanta” and received its world premiere in 1922. Following Zemlinsky’s death in 1942 in American exile the work quickly slipped from public awareness, not to be rediscovered until the 1970s. Since then it has been drawing crowds as a subtle, vibrant seismogram of a highly complex and psychological constellation.

    Video by Chris and the FATSOX [

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau

    7:06

    Alexander Zemlinsky was life's punching bag. After initial successes that pointed to an accomplished career for the young Zemlinsky - a prize-winning first opera, a second opera accepted by Gustav Mahler for the Vienna Court Opera, and a star pupil in the person of Arnold Schoenberg - things started to go wrong. A failed love-affair turned him into a laughing-stock, a miscalculated refusal of a post at the Berlin Opera didn't help his career (it was the same post Strauss had held), and the rise of the Nazis forced him into exile, first in Switzerland, and then in New York. The Mermaid was the first in a series of musical attempts to grapple with the demons of defeat - his opera Der Traumgörge (Goerge the Dreamer) and Der Zwerg (The Dwarf), both rife with autobiographical elements, were part of this process. Together, they are works that, in their bittersweet lyricism and moments of defiant exuberance, provide ample proof that no matter what life dealt him, Zemlinsky never lost confidence in his gifts as a composer.

    We have a failed love affair to thank for The Mermaid. Zemlinsky met Alma Schindler at a dinner party in February 1900 and was immediately captivated by her glamour and brilliance; her admission that Tristan und Isolde was her favorite opera was the icing on the cake. Her initial impression of him was slightly less rapt - she described him as chinless, small, with bulging eyes and as dreadfully ugly - but she began going to him for lessons anyway. After pursuing her for nearly two years, Zemlinsky was rejected by Alma, who had decided instead to marry Gustav Mahler, the composer-conductor who was director of the Vienna Court Opera at the time.

    As Antony Beaumont has pointed out in his study of Zemlinsky, the composer wrote The Mermaid as part of a psychological process meant to exorcise the trauma of Alma's marriage to Mahler. Zemlinsky turned to Hans Christian Andersen's mermaid story because of its resonance with his own situation at the time. In Andersen's story, a Mermaid saves a Prince from drowning and falls in love with him in the process. She goes to the Mer-witch, who, in exchange for her voice (the Witch cuts out the Mermaid's tongue), makes her human. But the bargain is perilous, for if the Mermaid fails to win the Prince, she will die. When the Prince marries another, the Mermaid's sisters go to the Mer-witch to try and save her. The Witch says that the Mermaid must kill the Prince, but she cannot bring herself to do it. Heartbroken, she plunges into the sea, but, instead of dying, is transformed into a Daughter of the Air and given another chance to regain her immortal soul. According to Beaumont, the composer saw himself as the Mermaid, with Alma as the Prince. In his musical setting of Andersen's tale, Zemlinsky was able to express his pain.

    The Mermaid opens with a musical depiction of the first lines of Andersen's tale: Far out in the ocean, where the water is as blue as the prettiest cornflower, and as clear as crystal, it is very, very deep; so deep, indeed, that no cable could fathom it. Many church steeples, piled one upon another, would not reach from the ground beneath to the surface of the water above. There dwell the Mer-king and his subjects. The movement is the most literal in its adherence to Andersen's narrative. Zemlinsky tells the story musically through a series of motives; an ascending figure depicting the bottom of the ocean, and the Mermaid's theme, introduced by solo violin, are among the motives heard at the outset of the first movement. The middle of the movement, which functions like a development section after the lengthy thematic exposition that precedes it, portrays the turbulent storm during which the Prince falls overboard; just as the music seems poised to reach its climax, we hear a sweet, extremely lyrical version of the Mermaid's theme.

  • Alexander Zemlinsky: Sonata for cello and piano

    25:28

    I Mit Leidenschaft
    II Andante 09:52
    III Andantino 18:00

    Anssi Karttunen, cello
    Nicolas Hodges, piano

    recorded at Fundación Juan March, Madrid, 22.5.2019

  • Alexander Zemlinsky: DER KÖNIG KANDAULES

    1:34:21

    Alexander Zemlinsky: DER KÖNIG KANDAULES (pt. 2)

    Salzburger Festspiele 2002

    00:00 - 9:26 II. Akt (2. Hälfte)

    9:26 - III. Akt

  • Zemlinsky - Lyrische Symphonie

    48:54

    Ivan Kusnjer, Karan Armstrongová
    Bohumil Gregor
    Czech PhilharmonicDescrizione

  • Alexander Zemlinsky Lyric Symphony - Michael Gielen 1994

    41:16

    01[00:00] 02[09:24] 03[16:01] 04[24:48] 05[28:16] 06[30:10] 07[34:10]

    Alexander Zemlinsky (1871 - 1942)
    Lyrische Symphonie op.18

    Michael Gielen
    James Johnson / baritone
    Vlatka Oršanić / soprano
    SWR Sinfonieorchester
    SWR Hans-Rosbaud-Studio February 21 & 23 1994

  • Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau The Mermaid Audio + Score

    38:45

    Alexander von Zemlinsky [1871 - 1942] - Die Seejungfrau 'The Mermaid' [1903]

    I. Sehr mässig bewegt [0:02]
    II. Sehr bewegt, rauschend [14:17]
    III. Sehr gedehnt, mit schmerzvollem Ausdruck [26:07]

    This richly orchestrated and envisioned, sweepingly Romantic symphonic poem is based on Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale. The Mermaid received one performance on January 25, 1905, at a concert that also premiered (Zemlinsky's brother-in-law) Arnold Schoenberg's well-known symphonic poem Pelleas und Melisande. The two composers are reported to have had many conversations about the possibilities of uniting the aesthetics of so-called pure music (Brahms, Busoni, Chopin, and others) with the narrative Romanticism of Wagner, Liszt, Berlioz, and others through the symphonic poem format. Zemlinsky withdrew his composition from further performance, and it wasn't until 1984 that the scores of the various movements (separated in America and Vienna) were correctly identified and a full performance was again staged.

    Zemlinsky does not provide a clear programme for the three movements, but musical analogues can generally be inferred by the listener. The first movement's tempo is Sehr mässig bewegt (Very moderate in movement) and opens with a depiction of the depths of the sea bed alternating with the playfulness of the mermaid and other sea creatures. The initially playful theme is turned into a furious sea storm, depicting the shipwreck (briefly interrupted by a lyrical theme of concern) and eventual rescue of the Prince.

    The second movement, Sehr bewegt, rauschend (Much movement, thunderous), opens with a marvelous effect: a roll on a suspended cymbal grows into a tremendous crescendo with the gradual accumulation of trilling winds and tremulous strings. The longing of the Mermaid for the Prince is depicted in lyrical and playful lines. The Prince receives some hunting call-type grandeur, but the main attention is paid to the Mermaid's feelings.

    The third movement is Sehr gedehnt, mit schmerzvollem Ausdruck (Very flexible, with sorrowful expression). The visit to the Sea Witch seems to be depicted in the opening of this movement as one hears oddly chromatic passages in the high winds, which alternate with the love theme given to a solo violin in the first movement. This is followed by the Prince's wedding, surrounded by great bursts of passionate, unresolved emotion (the overwhelming feelings of the Mermaid as she watches this spectacle, rather than music for the wedding itself). This is some of the composer's finest and most original writing from his early period. The beginning music describing the depths of the sea is heard again, and gentle music describes the Mermaid's transformation into an eternal spirit of the air.
    (

    Czech Philharmonic
    Antony Beaumont, conductor

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  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Serenada in la maggiore / posthumous

    20:46

    Elena Denisova & Alexei Kornienko
    LIVE / Waterloo 2018
    I.Mäßig/ II.Langsam, mit großem Ausdruck/ III.Sehr schnell und leicht/ IV.Mäßiges Walzer-Tempo/ V.Schnell

  • Anton von Zemlinsky : Quatuor à cordes n° 2 op. 15 par le Quatuor Hanson

    41:27

    Wolfgang Rihm : Quatuor à cordes n° 4 par le Quatuor Hanson, extrait filmé du concert enregistré en public au studio 106 de la Maison de la radio, le 15 octobre 2016 - Emission Plaisirs du Quatuor à réécouter dans son intégralité sur France Musique :

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Psalm 83

    12:31

    Alexander von Zemlinsky (1872-1942)
    Psalm 83 (1900)

    Slovak Philharmonic Choir
    Wiener Philharmoniker
    Riccardo Chailly

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau

    5:31

    Alexander Zemlinsky was life's punching bag. After initial successes that pointed to an accomplished career for the young Zemlinsky - a prize-winning first opera, a second opera accepted by Gustav Mahler for the Vienna Court Opera, and a star pupil in the person of Arnold Schoenberg - things started to go wrong. A failed love-affair turned him into a laughing-stock, a miscalculated refusal of a post at the Berlin Opera didn't help his career (it was the same post Strauss had held), and the rise of the Nazis forced him into exile, first in Switzerland, and then in New York. The Mermaid was the first in a series of musical attempts to grapple with the demons of defeat - his opera Der Traumgörge (Goerge the Dreamer) and Der Zwerg (The Dwarf), both rife with autobiographical elements, were part of this process. Together, they are works that, in their bittersweet lyricism and moments of defiant exuberance, provide ample proof that no matter what life dealt him, Zemlinsky never lost confidence in his gifts as a composer.

    We have a failed love affair to thank for The Mermaid. Zemlinsky met Alma Schindler at a dinner party in February 1900 and was immediately captivated by her glamour and brilliance; her admission that Tristan und Isolde was her favorite opera was the icing on the cake. Her initial impression of him was slightly less rapt - she described him as chinless, small, with bulging eyes and as dreadfully ugly - but she began going to him for lessons anyway. After pursuing her for nearly two years, Zemlinsky was rejected by Alma, who had decided instead to marry Gustav Mahler, the composer-conductor who was director of the Vienna Court Opera at the time.
    As Antony Beaumont has pointed out in his study of Zemlinsky, the composer wrote The Mermaid as part of a psychological process meant to exorcise the trauma of Alma's marriage to Mahler. Zemlinsky turned to Hans Christian Andersen's mermaid story because of its resonance with his own situation at the time. In Andersen's story, a Mermaid saves a Prince from drowning and falls in love with him in the process. She goes to the Mer-witch, who, in exchange for her voice (the Witch cuts out the Mermaid's tongue), makes her human. But the bargain is perilous, for if the Mermaid fails to win the Prince, she will die. When the Prince marries another, the Mermaid's sisters go to the Mer-witch to try and save her. The Witch says that the Mermaid must kill the Prince, but she cannot bring herself to do it. Heartbroken, she plunges into the sea, but, instead of dying, is transformed into a Daughter of the Air and given another chance to regain her immortal soul. According to Beaumont, the composer saw himself as the Mermaid, with Alma as the Prince. In his musical setting of Andersen's tale, Zemlinsky was able to express his pain.

    The second movement, a glittering scherzo, captures the atmosphere of the ball at the Mer-king's palace, one of those splendid sights which we can never see on earth, as Andersen described it. The orchestration is brilliant in the best Richard Strauss style. Five minutes into the movement, we hear the Mermaid alone, stealing away to the Mer-witch's lair. The music is insinuating, mysterious, and tinged with tragedy. A motive of great nobility, which Zemlinsky associated with the immortal soul, brings the section to a close. The movement ends with a return of the music from the ball, varied and given a lighter, more luminous orchestration.

  • Zemlinsky - String Quartet No. 2, Op 15.

    36:13

    Artis-Quartett.
    A fulgurant unique movement. Filled with a very tense atmosphere, sometimes a little depressive. Great harmonic complexity (and rather modern for zemlinsky).
    There is a real contrast with his first quartet, very Brahmsian. Second is more tinted of Schönberg. You can find a better description here :

    Artis-Quartett's website :

    I do not own the sheet music or the recording. If Yt adds advertising it is for compensate copyrights. All income go to the artists.

  • Imerlin Rose Op. 7 No. 4 - Alexander von Zemlinsky - Brianna Weckerly , Soprano

    3:00

    Imerlin Rose Op. 7 No. 4
    Music by Alexander von Zemlinsky

    Brianna Weckerly , Soprano
    Erika Switzer, Piano (MMF Faculty)

    MOSTLY MODERN FESTIVAL
    Skidmore College, Arthur Zankel Music Hall
    Saratoga Springs, New York (USA)
    6/15/2019

    Recorded by Arts Laureate

    LINKS


  • Tiefe Sehnsucht Op. 5 No. 6 - Alexander von Zemlinsky - Brianna Weckerly , Soprano

    43

    Tiefe Sehnsucht Op. 5 No. 6
    Music by Alexander von Zemlinsky

    Brianna Weckerly , Soprano
    Erika Switzer, Piano (MMF Faculty)

    MOSTLY MODERN FESTIVAL
    Skidmore College, Arthur Zankel Music Hall
    Saratoga Springs, New York (USA)
    6/15/2019

    Recorded by Arts Laureate

    LINKS


  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau

    6:28

    Alexander Zemlinsky was life's punching bag. After initial successes that pointed to an accomplished career for the young Zemlinsky - a prize-winning first opera, a second opera accepted by Gustav Mahler for the Vienna Court Opera, and a star pupil in the person of Arnold Schoenberg - things started to go wrong. A failed love-affair turned him into a laughing-stock, a miscalculated refusal of a post at the Berlin Opera didn't help his career (it was the same post Strauss had held), and the rise of the Nazis forced him into exile, first in Switzerland, and then in New York. The Mermaid was the first in a series of musical attempts to grapple with the demons of defeat - his opera Der Traumgörge (Goerge the Dreamer) and Der Zwerg (The Dwarf), both rife with autobiographical elements, were part of this process. Together, they are works that, in their bittersweet lyricism and moments of defiant exuberance, provide ample proof that no matter what life dealt him, Zemlinsky never lost confidence in his gifts as a composer.

    We have a failed love affair to thank for The Mermaid. Zemlinsky met Alma Schindler at a dinner party in February 1900 and was immediately captivated by her glamour and brilliance; her admission that Tristan und Isolde was her favorite opera was the icing on the cake. Her initial impression of him was slightly less rapt - she described him as chinless, small, with bulging eyes and as dreadfully ugly - but she began going to him for lessons anyway. After pursuing her for nearly two years, Zemlinsky was rejected by Alma, who had decided instead to marry Gustav Mahler, the composer-conductor who was director of the Vienna Court Opera at the time.

    As Antony Beaumont has pointed out in his study of Zemlinsky, the composer wrote The Mermaid as part of a psychological process meant to exorcise the trauma of Alma's marriage to Mahler. Zemlinsky turned to Hans Christian Andersen's mermaid story because of its resonance with his own situation at the time. In Andersen's story, a Mermaid saves a Prince from drowning and falls in love with him in the process. She goes to the Mer-witch, who, in exchange for her voice (the Witch cuts out the Mermaid's tongue), makes her human. But the bargain is perilous, for if the Mermaid fails to win the Prince, she will die. When the Prince marries another, the Mermaid's sisters go to the Mer-witch to try and save her. The Witch says that the Mermaid must kill the Prince, but she cannot bring herself to do it. Heartbroken, she plunges into the sea, but, instead of dying, is transformed into a Daughter of the Air and given another chance to regain her immortal soul. According to Beaumont, the composer saw himself as the Mermaid, with Alma as the Prince. In his musical setting of Andersen's tale, Zemlinsky was able to express his pain.

    The Mermaid opens with a musical depiction of the first lines of Andersen's tale: Far out in the ocean, where the water is as blue as the prettiest cornflower, and as clear as crystal, it is very, very deep; so deep, indeed, that no cable could fathom it. Many church steeples, piled one upon another, would not reach from the ground beneath to the surface of the water above. There dwell the Mer-king and his subjects. The movement is the most literal in its adherence to Andersen's narrative. Zemlinsky tells the story musically through a series of motives; an ascending figure depicting the bottom of the ocean, and the Mermaid's theme, introduced by solo violin, are among the motives heard at the outset of the first movement. The middle of the movement, which functions like a development section after the lengthy thematic exposition that precedes it, portrays the turbulent storm during which the Prince falls overboard; just as the music seems poised to reach its climax, we hear a sweet, extremely lyrical version of the Mermaid's theme.

  • Alexander Zemlinsky: Eine florentinische Tragödie op. 16

    1:24

    Alexander Zemlinsky (1871-1942): Eine florentinische Tragödie, opera in un atto su libretto di Oscar Wilde tradotto in tedesco da Max Meyerfeld, op. 16 (1916) --- Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France diretta da Armin Jordan ---

    Personaggi e interpreti:
    Bianca: Iris Vermillion
    Guido: Viktor Lutsiuk
    Simone: Albert Dohmen

    --- cover image by Bernardo Bellotto ---

    The music published in this channel is exclusively dedicated to divulgation purposes and not commercial. This within a program shared to study learned music of the 1900's (mostly Italian) which involves thousands of people around the world. If someone, for any reason, would deem that a video appearing in this channel violates the copyright, please inform us immediately before you submit a claim to Youtube, and it will be our care to remove immediately the video accordingly.

    Your collaboration will be appreciated.

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Die Seejungfrau

    6:22

    Alexander Zemlinsky was life's punching bag. After initial successes that pointed to an accomplished career for the young Zemlinsky - a prize-winning first opera, a second opera accepted by Gustav Mahler for the Vienna Court Opera, and a star pupil in the person of Arnold Schoenberg - things started to go wrong. A failed love-affair turned him into a laughing-stock, a miscalculated refusal of a post at the Berlin Opera didn't help his career (it was the same post Strauss had held), and the rise of the Nazis forced him into exile, first in Switzerland, and then in New York. The Mermaid was the first in a series of musical attempts to grapple with the demons of defeat - his opera Der Traumgörge (Goerge the Dreamer) and Der Zwerg (The Dwarf), both rife with autobiographical elements, were part of this process. Together, they are works that, in their bittersweet lyricism and moments of defiant exuberance, provide ample proof that no matter what life dealt him, Zemlinsky never lost confidence in his gifts as a composer.

    We have a failed love affair to thank for The Mermaid. Zemlinsky met Alma Schindler at a dinner party in February 1900 and was immediately captivated by her glamour and brilliance; her admission that Tristan und Isolde was her favorite opera was the icing on the cake. Her initial impression of him was slightly less rapt - she described him as chinless, small, with bulging eyes and as dreadfully ugly - but she began going to him for lessons anyway. After pursuing her for nearly two years, Zemlinsky was rejected by Alma, who had decided instead to marry Gustav Mahler, the composer-conductor who was director of the Vienna Court Opera at the time.
    As Antony Beaumont has pointed out in his study of Zemlinsky, the composer wrote The Mermaid as part of a psychological process meant to exorcise the trauma of Alma's marriage to Mahler. Zemlinsky turned to Hans Christian Andersen's mermaid story because of its resonance with his own situation at the time. In Andersen's story, a Mermaid saves a Prince from drowning and falls in love with him in the process. She goes to the Mer-witch, who, in exchange for her voice (the Witch cuts out the Mermaid's tongue), makes her human. But the bargain is perilous, for if the Mermaid fails to win the Prince, she will die. When the Prince marries another, the Mermaid's sisters go to the Mer-witch to try and save her. The Witch says that the Mermaid must kill the Prince, but she cannot bring herself to do it. Heartbroken, she plunges into the sea, but, instead of dying, is transformed into a Daughter of the Air and given another chance to regain her immortal soul. According to Beaumont, the composer saw himself as the Mermaid, with Alma as the Prince. In his musical setting of Andersen's tale, Zemlinsky was able to express his pain.

    The second movement, a glittering scherzo, captures the atmosphere of the ball at the Mer-king's palace, one of those splendid sights which we can never see on earth, as Andersen described it. The orchestration is brilliant in the best Richard Strauss style. Five minutes into the movement, we hear the Mermaid alone, stealing away to the Mer-witch's lair. The music is insinuating, mysterious, and tinged with tragedy. A motive of great nobility, which Zemlinsky associated with the immortal soul, brings the section to a close. The movement ends with a return of the music from the ball, varied and given a lighter, more luminous orchestration.

  • UNA TRAGÈDIA FLORENTINA / EL NAN dAlexander von Zemlinsky

    4:15

    EL NAN / UNA TRAGÈDIA FLORENTINA, treball realitzat per Ignacio Castanera, Pol Mas i Silvia Philbrick, alumnes de l'assignatura de Projectes II de 3er curs en l'itinerari curricular d'audiovisual sota la tutoria del professor Josep M. Marimon i la coordinació de Elisabeth Ferrandiz, Responsable de la Unitat departamental d'Audiovisuals i Gràfic, en el marc del conveni de col•laboració entre el Gran Teatre del Liceu i l'Escola Superior de Disseny ESDi.

    Més informació:

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Sinfonietta op.23 - II movement

    7:18

    The Austrian composer and conductor Alexander von Zemlinsky was born in Vienna in 1871. His reputation has to some extent been overshadowed by the controversial and influential achievements of his brother-in-law Arnold Schoenberg, with Alban Berg and Anton Webern, on the one hand, and by those of his older contemporary Gustav Mahler. Zemlinsky continues the tradition of Viennese classicism, the influence of Wagner never leading him to abandon tonality. In some measure he represents a generation of Viennese composers who were able to combine the apparently divergent tendencies of Brahms and Wagner.

    Zemlinsky was trained at the Vienna Conservatory, where he was a composition pupil of Johann Nepomuk Fuchs, himself a pupil of Sechter, who had taught Schubert briefly, and of Bruckner, in the intervals of writing his daily fugue. Always a fine craftsman, Zemlinsky was able to instruct Schoenberg, whom he met in the amateur orchestra Polyhymnia in 1895, in counterpoint, and gave him advice on his earlier work. He was to remain for some time a strong influence both on Schoenberg and on younger composers in Vienna. He also taught Alma Schindler, later the wife of Mahler, who in 1897 became conductor at the Court Opera in Vienna

    Zemlinskys close association with Schoenberg, a relationship strengthened when the latter married Zemlinskys sister Mathilde, brought early collaboration in the opera Sarema, for which Schoenberg assisted with the libretto. Both men were indebted to Mahler for practical encouragement. It was Mahler who presented Zemlinskys second opera Es war einmal at the Court Opera in 1900, and accepted his next opera Der Traumgörge for performance. Later operas included two works based on Oscar Wilde, Eine Florentinische Tragödie, and Der Zwerg, a version of The Birthday of the Infanta.

    In addition to these and other stage works, Zemlinsky wrote songs, chamber music and four symphonies. The last of these, the Lyrische Sinfonie of 1923, using a text from Rabindranath Tagore, was quoted by Berg in his own Lyric Suite, as a sign of respect and affection.

    Zemlinskys career was essentially in opera. In 1899 he became Kapellmeister at the Carltheater in Vienna, and later conducted also at the Volksoper, where he was Kapellmeister from 1906 until 1911, with a break during Mahlers last season, 1907-08, when he conducted at the Court Opera. From 1911 until 1927 he was conductor at the Deutsche Landestheater in Prague, where he employed Schoenbergs pupils Webern, Jalowetz and Karl Horowitz. This period was followed by appointment as Kapellmeister at the Kroll Theatre in Berlin, under Klemperer, and the continuation of his work as a teacher, which he had carried out in Prague, at the Berlin Musikhochschule. At the accession to power of Hitler in 1933, Zemlinsky made his escape to Vienna, and at the Anschluss in 1938 moved first to Prague and then to the United States, where he died in 1942. (naxos.com)

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky - Drei Stücke für Cello und Klavier - Humoreske

    3:01

    Probe 05.09.2015 Stuttgart

  • The Zemlinsky Quartet plays Zemlinskys Quartet 1

    26:55

    A. Zemlinsky : Quartet Nr. 1 A major Op. 4
    Allegro
    Scherzo : Allegretto
    Breit und kräftig
    Vivace

    Zemlinsky Quartet :
    Frantisek Soucek, Violin I
    Petr Strizek, Violin II
    Petr Holman, Viola
    Vladimir Fortin, Cello

    Festival Wissembourg, August 321st 2016

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky – Morská panna, fantázia pre orchester

    5:06

    Slovenská filharmónia a Streamboyz pozývajú na výnimočný hudobný zážitok!

    Milí diváci, máte jedinečnú možnosť počuť a vidieť naživo veľkolepé symfonické dielo, ktoré sa často nehráva!

    Slovenská filharmónia uvádza fantáziu pre orchester Alexandra von Zemlinského „Morská panna“. Orchester SF diriguje Rastislav Štúr.

    Piatok, 26. 2. 2016 o 19 h v Koncertnej sieni Slovenskej filharmónie.

    Vstupenky hodinu pred koncertom
    Pokladnica SF
    Nám. Eugena Suchoňa 1

    Info:

    Alexander von Zemlinsky bol jedným z reprezentantov zložitej epochy fin de siécle. Jeho verzia rozprávky Hansa Christiana Andersena je sladkobôľnym hudobným príbehom prebiehajúcim v kvetnatom inštrumentačnom opare.

    Ukážka je záznamom koncertu, ktorý sa konal vo štvrtok, 25. 2. 2016.

    Na koncerte okrem Zemlinského úžasného diela ešte zaznie takisto málo známy Koncert pre husle a orchester č. 1 c mol, op. 88, Josefa Bohuslava Foerstera v podaní René Kubelika a predohra Oberon Carla Mariu von Webera.

    Záznam a túto pozvánku pre vás pripravil tím Streamboyz SF
    Vašo Frkal – zvuk, svetlá
    Stano Beňačka – kamery, strih
    Marek Piaček – réžia

    Tešíme sa na vašu návštevu!

    PS od Streamboyz: Je to naozaj výnimočné dielo! Treba vidieť naživo!

  • Der Zwerg | Zemlinsky

    1:22:44

    Opéra de Lille, 2018

    Der Zwerg - Zemlinsky

    Der Zwerg : Mathias Vidal
    Donna Clara, Infantin von Spanien : Jennifer Courcier
    Ghita, ihre Lieblingszofe : Julie Robard-Gendre
    Don Estoban, Haushofmeister : Christian Helmer

    Drei Zofen :
    Laura Holm
    Fiona McGown
    Marielou Jacquard

    Damen im Gefolge der Infantin :
    Adèle Carlier
    Alice Kamenezky
    Anne-Marine Suire
    Anne-Sophie Vincent
    Morgane Collomb
    Coline Dutilleul
    Anouk Molendijk
    Sofia Obregon

    Ensemble Ictus conducted by Franck Ollu
    Stage director / set designer : Daniel Jeanneteau

    Lighting designer : Marie-Christine Soma
    Costume designer : Olga Karpinsky
    Vocal coach and musical assistant : Nicolas Chesneau
    Stage director assistant : Olivier Brichet
    Staging adviser : Quentin Bouissou
    Choreographer : Thierry Thieû Niang
    German diction : Volker Haller
    Hair and make up designer : Elisabeth Delesalle

  • Alessandra Marc; Håkan Hagegård; Lyrische Symphonie; Alexander Zemlinsky

    47:26

    Alessandra Marc--soprano
    Håkan Hagegård--baritone
    Riccardo Chailly--conductor
    Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra
    1993

  • ALEXANDER VON ZEMLINSKY Symphony in B-Flat Edgar Seipenbusch

    42:17

    Alexander von Zemlinsky Symphony in B-Flat Major
    1. Movement Sostenuto
    2. Movement Scherzo
    3. Movement Adagio
    4. Movement Moderato
    Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
    Edgar Seipenbusch, conductor
    recorded : XI. 1985

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky- Lyrische Symphonie. V. Friede, Mein Herz

    12:34

    Orchestre de Paris, Eschenbach

  • Mezzo Soprano Pia Heise and Pianist Roger Vignoles: Süße, süße Sommernacht. Alexander von Zemlinsky

    1:47

  • Alexander von Zemlinsky String Quartet live from Davos Festival

    24:18

    Video recording of the Alexander von Zemlinsky String Quartet playing live at the Davos Festival Embrace and entwine live stream concert. Recorded and streamed live as part of the young artists in concert live stream series with IC247.
    String quartett Nr. 3 op. 19
    Allegretto
    Thema mit Variationen
    Romanze
    Burleske. Sehr lebhaft (Allegro moderato)
    Visit for more information

  • ALEXANDER VON ZEMLINSKY Symphony in B-Flat 3.Adagio

    8:42

    Alexander von Zemlinsky Symphony in B-Flat Major
    3. Movement Adagio
    Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
    Edgar Seipenbusch, conductor
    recorded : XI. 1985

  • ALEXANDER VON ZEMLINSKY Symphony in B-Flat 1. Sostenuto

    14:35

    Alexander von Zemlinsky Symphony in B-Flat Major
    1. Movement Sostenuto
    Slovak Philharmonic Orchestra
    Edgar Seipenbusch, conductor
    recorded : XI. 1985

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