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Playlist of (Mother Earth's) Plantasia

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  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia

    31:04

    The first official reissue of Mort Garson's legendary 1976 album 'Mother Earth's Plantasia' is out on Sacred Bones Records on June 21.
    Preorder LP/CD:

  • x
  • Music to Soothe the Savage Snake Plant

    3:24

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Music to Soothe the Savage Snake Plant · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • x
  • Lofi to help your plants grow ???? - lofi hip hop mix study/sleep

    32:54

    A lofi hip hop mix to help your houseplants grow.

    Inspired by the wonderful 'Mother Earth's Plantasia' album by Mort Garson: warm earth music for plants.. and the people that love them.

    Thank you for listening ♡

    Tracklist:
    00:00 nostalgia. - SAD! cover
    02:17 jhfly - waltz (from 'even more sounds')
    04:08 Elijah Lee - I met this cute girl at school
    05:45 ivoire - harbor
    08:55 benhurzz - mellow words (from 'glow ep')
    12:33 Sky.High - feelings
    14:33 .oschea - Coming Around
    16:38 ivoire - sippy cups
    17:55 Sky.High - my soda is pink, but i want it orange (from 'Twenty-four hours ep')
    19:47 Sky.High - Affection (from 'Reflections')
    21:19 ivoire - paper people
    23:21 Sky.High - late night dream.
    25:02 Sky.High - Cherish (from 'Meraki')
    27:08 benhurzz - manila. (from 'glow ep')
    30:40 Sky.High - Sonder

    ♫ Don’t forget to check out and support the beatmakers:
    ➳ nostalgia



    ➳ jhfly



    ➳ Elijah Lee



    ➳ ivoire

    (main account)


    ➳ benhurzz



    ➳ Sky.High




    ???? Artwork by Maori Sakai:



    Note: my channel is not monetized, I do not own any of the music and I do not make any money from my videos.
    Nonetheless if an artist has a problem with a video, please contact me at lolife.channel@gmail.com and I will sort it out ASAP.

  • Plantasia

    3:22

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Plantasia · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • x
  • Mother Earths Plantasia - Mort Garson ‎

    31:26

    Mort Garson ‎– Mother Earth's Plantasia
    Label:
    Homewood Records ‎– H-101
    Format:
    Vinyl, LP, Album
    Country:
    US
    Released:
    1976
    Genre:
    Electronic
    Style:
    Experimental, Ambient


    Side one
    No. Title Length
    1. Plantasia 3:21
    2. Symphony for a Spider Plant 2:41
    3. Baby's Tears Blues 3:03
    4. Ode to an African Violet 4:03
    5. Concerto for Philodendron & Pothos 3:09
    Side two
    No. Title Length
    6. Rhapsody in Green 3:28
    7. Swingin' Spathiphyllums 2:59
    8. You Don't Have to Walk a Begonia 2:31
    9. A Mellow Mood for Maidenhair 2:17
    10. Music to Soothe the Savage Snake Plant



    *Mother Earth's Plantasia is an electronic album by Mort Garson first released in 1976. The music on it was composed specifically for plants to listen to.[6] The album had a very limited distribution upon release, only being available to people who bought a houseplant from a store called Mother Earth in Los Angeles or those who purchased a Simmons mattress from a Sears outlet, both of which came with the record.[6] As a result, the album failed to attain widespread popularity around the time of its release. However, it has since gained a cult following as an early work of electronic music.[7] Garson used a Moog synthesizer to compose the album.[6]

  • Mother Earths Plantasia - Secret Banana Jam

    3:21

    One of a kind , ultra rare , deepest of the deep cuts
    Mort Garson X Joe Bananas III
    music for banana plants

  • x
  • An Ode to Plantasia: For Mort Garson and the People Who Love Him

    26:52

    Plantasia at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden was an evening of multi-sensory experiences inspired by Mort Garson’s 1976 album 'Mother Earth's Plantasia.' Attendees enjoyed ambient modular explorations performed live by electronic artist Patricia throughout the duration of the June 2019 event. Now, we're pleased to share that experience with you here.

    Piece #1 - @0:00
    Piece #2 - @5:57
    Piece #3 - @10:36
    Piece #4 - @15:22
    Piece #5 - @20:41

    MORE ABOUT 'PLANTASIA'

    In 1976, composer Mort Garson released 'Mother Earth's Plantasia,' an album recorded especially for plants... and the people who love them, as its cover artwork shows. The first album on the West Coast recorded using just a Moog modular synthesizer, this collection of avant-garde compositions would later become a cult classic among electronic music enthusiasts worldwide.

    Original pressings of the album were only available with the purchase of a plant from Mother Earth on Melrose Ave in LA or with the purchase of a Simmons mattress from Sears. Although recordings of the album had been difficult to find until its vinyl reissue on June 21st, 2019, the playful psychedelic nature of Garson’s rare work is known to have inspired modern motifs such as the Zelda’s Lullaby (a popular theme from Nintendo’s Zelda: Ocarina of Time, which bears a striking resemblance to Concerto for a Philodendron).

    New black vinyl LP edition, audiophile 2xLP edition, and 8-track edition options are all available for preorder—out November 6th, 2020—via Sacred Bones Records, coinciding with the label’s The Mort Garson Archival Reissue Series release.

    Special thanks to:
    Atlas Obscura (
    Brooklyn Botanic Garden (
    Patricia (
    Sacred Bones Records (

    More about Mort Garson:

    More about 'Mother Earth’s Plantasia':

    More about Moog modular systems:

  • Mort Garson ‎– Mother Earths Plantasia ‎ Homewood Records ‎– H-101

    31:32

    *DISCLAIMER* NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. I DO NOT OWN THE RIGHTS TO MUSIC IN THIS VIDEO. I DO NOT MONETIZE THIS VIDEO. If you own copyright to this music please contact me first I will take down immediately!

  • Swingin Spathiphyllums

    2:59

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Swingin' Spathiphyllums · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • x
  • Magical Moog LP Helps Your Plants Grow?! + Recent Def Buys! - Vinyl Community

    7:25

    Welcome to Deaf By Records!

    EP#5 exposes a magical record from the 70’s that helps our houseplants grow! ;) Mort Garson's Mother Earth's Plantasia is featured!

    I also talk about some of my recent record “def buys” featuring musical styles such as deep dubstep, jazz-funk, jazz, balearic, experimental & more!

    Thanks for watching!

    Please check out the following links for more details on the fun aspects surrounding the Mother Earth’s Plantasia LP!:

    Vice:
    Pitchfork:
    Discogs:
    Sacred Bones:
    Finding Plantasia documentary:

    Bands/artists/musicians featured in today’s episode:

    Mort Garson:
    Burial:
    Misha Panfilov Sound Combo:
    Kokoroko:
    Kamaal Williams:
    Jura Soundsystem:
    Secret Chiefs 3:

    (I’m not sponsored by anyone. This includes all of the bands/artists/musicians/companies & sites that I have links to).

  • Mother Earths Plantasia Mort Garson 1976 Full Album

    31:19

  • Mother Earths Plantasia - Mort Garson - 1940 19m40s_10

    3:49

    Mort Garson’s “Mother Earth’s Plantasia”
    Acoustic Version by Enrico Gabrielli
    19m40s_10
    Track 1 - Plantasia

    Esecutori di Metallo su Carta

    Rodrigo D’Erasmo, violin
    Giovanni Volpe, cello
    Luca Medioli, french horn
    Luisa Santacesaria, keyboards
    Damiano Afrifa, keyboards
    Sebastiano De Gennaro, keyboards and percussions
    Enrico Gabrielli, keyboards, flute, clarinets, saxophone, voice
    Katia Ajello, harp

    Recorded and mixed by Tommaso Colliva and Carlo Madaghiele
    at Laboratori Testone (Milan, Italy), 16th and 17th september 2019
    Mastering by Roberto Rettura at Lo Studio Spaziale (Bologna, Italy)

    Annalisa “Nali” Limonta, illustrations and graphic design

    19’40’’
    De Gennaro, Gabrielli, Fusaro, Lamorgese

    This record is dedicated to all the plants of the only planet we have

  • Ode to an African Violet

    4:03

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Ode to an African Violet · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Rhapsody in Green

    3:28

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Rhapsody in Green · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Mother Earths Plantasia///+ Mort Garson 1976 Full Album///+

    31:19

    Mother Earth's Plantasia///+'' Mort Garson 1976 Full Album///+1 Plantasia - 03:19
    2 Symphony for a Spider Plant - 02:37
    3 Baby's Tears Blues - 03:01
    4 Ode to an Afican Violet - 03:59
    5 Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos - 03:03...6 Rhapsody in Green - 03:25
    7 Swingin' Spathiphyllums - 02:55
    8 You Don't Have to Walk a Begonia - 02:29
    9 Mellow Mood for Maidenhair - 02:10
    10 Music to Soothe the Savage Snake Plant - 03:18..../I am here exclusively for the sake of music culture and music promotion of the 70s of my generation and not for the sake of taking Copyright + that is not my goal but setting and permeating music that was the perfection of the 70s that filled the beauty of music and the cult of music'HOW MANY ADMINISTRATION YOU TUBE CONSIDERS THAT I AM A COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT AND TO REMOVE THIS VIDEO, I WILL DEFINITELY RIGHT! And that is not my goal to infringe Copyright + Thanks to You Tube Administrator for understanding !!I Mother Earth, or IME, is a Canadian rock band. The band formed in 1990 and reached its peak in popularity in the mid-to-late 1990s. After an eight-year hiatus, the band reunited in 2012. Between 1996 and 2016, I Mother Earth was among the top 150 selling Canadian artists in Canada and among the top 40 selling Canadian bands in Canada.Early years
    The brother duo of drummer Christian and guitarist Jagori Tanna met vocalist Edwin at their shared rehearsal space in 1990. Edwin asked the brothers to form a band with him, and the three came together in 1991, taking on Franz Masini as a bass player. The band came up with the name IME, as in I Am Me, but later decided the letters should stand for something. Jag Tanna ad-libbed the name I Mother Earth and has always insisted it has no special meaning. The band, represented by a professionally recorded five-song demo, played a mere thirteen shows over the next year. These were noted for their jam sessions, poetry readings, and murals painted in the background during the songs. At the end of the year, the band was in the middle of a bidding war between labels.Success
    In 1992, I Mother Earth signed to a co-venture deal brokered between Capitol Records (U.S.) and its Canadian affiliate, EMI Music Canada. The band travelled to Los Angeles in 1992 to record its debut album with former Guns N' Roses producer Mike Clink. During these sessions, Franz Masini was fired, leaving Jag Tanna to re-record the bass parts himself. At the completion of the album, Masini was replaced by Bruce Gordon, whose band Rocktopus was breaking up at that time. With the lineup solidified, the band underwent an intensive international tour to support its debut, Dig, in mid-1993. Considered an anomaly in the alternative era and often mistaken for heavy metal, the album combined traditional hard rock with grooves, extended jams, psychedelic lyrics, and the Latin-based percussion of Luis Conte and Armando Borg. Dig spawned four singles, three of which originated from IME's demo tape and were later included on the proper album. Rain Will Fall, Not Quite Sonic and Levitate were released in 1993, and So Gently We Go was released in the summer of 1994. All four garnered radio and video airplay in Canada, as well as rotations in the U.S. and Europe. The latter two singles in particular charted well on Canadian rock radio. The Dig album won a Juno Award in 1994 for Best Hard Rock Album, beating out IME's childhood idols Rush for the award. This cemented a long relationship between the two bands, which started with IME opening for Rush the night after the Junos. By the end of the album's run, Dig was a Gold record in Canada.

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 01 Plantasia

    3:26

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 07 Swingin Spathiphyllums

    3:01

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Plantasia But Its All Images Of Plants

    31:08

    pls pray for our little friend the sick cactus at 07:16


    Made by:

    Andrea Pardo @andreapardo___
    Yuse Riera @yuseriera / yuseriera.com


    Tracklist:

    00:00 - Plantasia
    03:34 - Symphony for a Spider Plant
    06:14 - Baby's Tears Blues
    09:18 - Ode to an African Violet
    13:20 - Concerto for Philodendron & Pothos
    16:25 - Rhapsody in Green
    19:54 - Swingin' Spathiphyllums
    22:52 - You Don't Have to Walk a Begonia
    25:24 - A Mellow Mood for Maidenhair
    27:36 - Music to Soothe the Savage Snake Plant

  • Mort Garson - Ode To An African Violet - Mother Earths Plantasia

    3:51

    This video is a tribute to Mort Garson's music, to his sensitivity and avant-garde approach, that make Mother Earth's Plantasia an artwork that still resounds today.
    It is also a celebration of our beautiful planet.

    Mort Garson - « Ode to an african violet », out now on Sacred Bones records

    Stream & Buy 'Mother Earth's Plantasia'

    Subscribe to Virgo Films

    Directed by Cécilia Ranval and Mickaël Valli

    Production Company: Virgo Films

    Actress: Anna Moine

    Director of Photography: Jehane Mahmoud

    Drone Photography: Maxime Boudier @ Dronemenciel

    Camera Assistants: Neena Magniette
    Margot Artozqui

    Film editor: Christophe Pinel
    Jérôme Zambar

    After effects: Jonathan Lagache

    Costume: Atelier Darwin
    Faty Alami

    Story-board artist: Cédric Diomède

    Vase: Wang & Söderström

    Special thanks to Machine Molle, Ramon Pipin, Alexia Cayre, Colombe D'Humières, Simone Cuq, Jérémie Girard, Léa Gouzy and Yvette Moine

  • Babys Tears Blues

    3:04

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Baby's Tears Blues · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • x
  • A Mellow Mood for Maidenhair

    2:18

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    A Mellow Mood for Maidenhair · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • 3:24

    i used obxd to make all the sounds

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 03 Babys Tears Blues

    3:06

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Concerto for Philodendron & Pothos

    3:07

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Concerto for Philodendron & Pothos · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 10 Music to Soothe the Savage Snake Plant

    3:26

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Mort Garson - Plantasia

    3:22

    Album: Mother Earth's Plantasia

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 04 Ode to an African Violet

    4:06

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 08 You Dont Have to Walk a Begonia

    2:36

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Más música para plantas: Mother Earths Plantasia de Mort Garson y Greenhouse de Louie Zong

    6:38

    Si con Music For Plants de Magda Drozd exploramos sonidos extraídos de las plantas, con Mother Earth's Plantasia escuchamos sonidos creados específicamente para que las plantas crezcan. E inspirado en este último, Louie Zong saca en prácticamente 15 días Greenhouse, un hommage que hereda el dinamismo de sus muchos trabajos.

    Así los amantes de las plantas y la música tienen una trilogía de sonidos para escoger.

    Escucha Mother Earth's Plantasia:

    Greenhouse de Louie Zong y bandcamp:

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 09 A Mellow Mood for Maidenhair

    2:21

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Symphony for a Spider Plant

    2:42

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Symphony for a Spider Plant · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Mort Garson - Plantasia

    3:18

    Mort Garson:


    ♥!

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 02 Symphony for a Spider Plant

    2:46

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 05 Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos

    3:11

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Mort Garson - Swingin Spathiphyllums

    2:56

    warm earth animation for plants and the people who love them
    Mort Garson - Plantasia (1976)

    animation made by me
    (Joaquim Pedro Pinheiro) ????
    I don't own rights to this music

  • Konser Plantasia - Live in Bandung

    3:13

    The inspired came by Mort Garson on his album; Mother's Earth Plantasia, we made made Konser Plantasia (Plantasia Concert), which only plants being our audiences on the concert. Reacted to Covid-19 pandemic which isn’t allowing crowds, we made 90 minutes music show for plants, publics weren’t allowed to watch on the venue.

    We have probed deeply some of the research about music affects to plants and refined them into one music composition that improves plants’s growth. The component of classic music, string element, evade low frequencies, melodies repetitive, tuning 423hz to audio frequency of 5000hz became choices to be heard ahead of plants audiences.

    But not only that, we also took on a history of Indonesian culture that has a special connection to rice plants, such the sound of Karinding which can ridding vermin to the Tarawangsa which used in the rituals toward Dewi Sri as the goddess of rice.

    The plant owner came to the venue just to dropped the plants, after they got the plants details, the plants stored inside the venue for the concert. The plant owner left the venue and they were granted for live streaming access to supervice their plants during the show. After the concert, they came back to pickup the plants and was given an audio file so they could play it back at their house.

    On the show, we successfully done built a different concert during Covid-19 pandemic. Some of the plants which came to the concert responded directly, such the flowers bloom faster, the cayenne was ripe faster until the leaves bloom more greener.

    Once carried out in Bandung, July 25, 2020, Konser Plantasia will come in several Indonesia’s cities to continue the tour. The concept of this show is giving expanse for us to keep in work on music during pandemic also it becomes an expansion for their fans who are also have the plants to interact directly through music. Because plants become an important part of daily life, as friends, as family and as the source of life.

  • Mort Garson - Mother Earths Plantasia - 06 Rhapsody in Green

    3:31

    In the mid-1970s, a force of nature swept across the continental United States, cutting across all strata of race and class, rooting in our minds, our homes, our culture. It wasn’t The Exorcist, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road, or even bell-bottoms, but instead a book called The Secret Life of Plants. The work of occultist/former OSS agent Peter Tompkins and former CIA agent/dowsing enthusiast Christopher Bird, the books shot up the bestseller charts and spread like kudzu across the landscape, becoming a phenomenon. Seemingly overnight, the indoor plant business was in full bloom and photosynthetic eukaryotes of every genus were hanging off walls, lording over bookshelves, and basking on sunny window ledges. The science behind Secret Life was specious: plants can hear our prayers, they’re lie detectors, they’re telepathic, able to predict natural disasters and receive signals from distant galaxies. But that didn’t stop millions from buying and nurturing their new plants.

    Perhaps the craziest claim of the book was that plants also dug music. And whether you purchased a snake plant, asparagus fern, peace lily, or what have you from Mother Earth on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles (or bought a Simmons mattress from Sears), you also took home Plantasia, an album recorded especially for them. Subtitled “warm earth music for plants…and the people that love them,” it was full of bucolic, charming, stoner-friendly, decidedly unscientific tunes enacted on the new-fangled device called the Moog. Plants date back from the dawn of time, but apparently they loved the Moog, never mind that the synthesizer had been on the market for just a few years. Most of all, the plants loved the ditties made by composer Mort Garson.

    Few characters in early electronic music can be both fearless pioneers and cheesy trend-chasers, but Garson embraced both extremes, and has been unheralded as a result. When one writer rhetorically asked: “How was Garson’s music so ubiquitous while the man remained so under the radar?” the answer was simple. Well before Brian Eno did it, Garson was making discreet music, both the man and his music as inconspicuous as a Chlorophytum comosum. Julliard-educated and active as a session player in the post-war era, Garson wrote lounge hits, scored plush arrangements for Doris Day, and garlanded weeping countrypolitan strings around Glen Campbell’s “By the Time I Get to Phoenix.” He could render the Beatles and Simon & Garfunkel alike into easy listening and also dreamed up his own ditties. “An idear” as Garson himself would drawl it out. “I live with it, I walk it, I sing it.”

    But as his daughter Day Darmet recalls: “When my dad found the synthesizer, he realized he didn’t want to do pop music anymore.” Garson encountered Robert Moog and his new device at the Audio Engineering Society’s West Coast convention in 1967 and immediately began tinkering with the device. With the Moog, those idears could be transformed. “He constantly had a song he was humming,” Darmet says. “At the table he was constantly tapping.” Which is to say that Mort pulled his melodies out of thin air, just like any household plant would.
    The Plantae kingdom grew to its height by 1976, from DC Comics’ mossy superhero Swamp Thing to Stevie Wonder’s own herbal meditation, Journey Through the Secret Life of Plants. Nefarious manifestations of human-plant interaction also abounded, be it the grotesque pods in Invasion of the Body Snatchers or the pothead paranoia of the US Government spraying Mexican marijuana fields with the herbicide paraquat (which led to the rise in homegrown pot by the 1980s). And then there’s the warm, leafy embrace of Plantasia itself.

    “My mom had a lot of plants,” Darmet says. “She didn’t believe in organized religion, she believed the earth was the best thing in the whole world. Whatever created us was incredible.” And she also knew when her husband had a good song, shouting from another room when she heard him humming a good idear. Novel as it might seem, Plantasia is simply full of good tunes.

    Garson may have given the album away to new plant and bed owners, but a decade later a new generation could hear his music in another surreptitious way. Millions of kids bought The Legend of Zelda for their Nintendo Entertainment System back in 1986 and one distinct 8-bit tune bears more than a passing resemblance to album highlight “Concerto for Philodendron and Pothos.” Garson was never properly credited for it, but he nevertheless subliminally slipped into a new generations’ head, helping kids and plants alike grow.

    Hearing Plantasia in the 21st century, it seems less an ode to our photosynthesizing friends by Garson and more an homage to his wife, the one with the green thumb that made everything flower around him. “My dad would be totally pleased to know that people are really interested in th

  • Plantasia - Mort Garson Cover

    3:54

    I only stumbled across Mort Garson's wonderful album Mother Earth's Plantasia fairly recently, but immediately fell in love with it.
    Here's my rendition of the title track, performed entirely on my Dotcom Modular.
    Check out my album releases:
    Looking for music for your project? Get in touch: scott@scottampleford.com
    Check out my website:
    My Filmography:

  • You Dont Have to Walk a Begonia

    2:32

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    You Don't Have to Walk a Begonia · Mort Garson

    Mother Earth's Plantasia

    ℗ 2019 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2019-03-22

    Mixer: Mort Garson
    Producer: Mort Garson
    Composer: Mort Garson
    Music Publisher: Mort Garson

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • 2019年ベスト再発アルバム「Mother Earths Plantasia」が生まれた背景について!至極の一枚!

    10:11

    【音楽リポート!過去の放送】


    「大橋コユキのFreeStyle」
     井川智太Dの音楽リポート!は、毎週メジャーからインディーズ、はたまた超マニアックなアーティストを紹介。アーティストの人物像やその背景に迫ります。

    今回は音楽リポート!と題して、2019年 個人的ベスト再発アルバムを発表!
    「Mother Earth's Plantasia」が生まれた背景について語る。

    【さくらラジオHP】


    さくらラジオは米国内にのみ放送しているインターネットラジオです。ラジオは著作権等の法規の問題で地域をアメリカに限定しております。このYouTubeは日本はもちろん、全世界の皆さんが聞けるようにオープンしました。

    #MotherEarthsPlantasia
    #MortGarson
    #ベストアルバム2019

  • Mort Garson - Plantasia

    27:01

    Who's the Boss? - The Intelligence of Plants and Trees

    The Secret World of the Plants

    Mort Garson - Plantasia (1976)

  • Mother Earth

    4:58

    Provided to YouTube by TuneCore Japan

    Mother Earth · PiANO MASTER

    Beautiful Forest

    ℗ 2019 FARM RECORDS

    Released on: 2019-08-10

    Composer: DSK
    Composer: Y. WATANABE

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Changes

    4:23

    Provided to YouTube by DistroKid

    Changes · Plantasia

    Changes

    ℗ Plantasia

    Released on: 2019-04-19

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Mother Earth - Apple Green

    4:27

    Acid Jazz Apple Green

  • Both of Us

    5:11

    Provided to YouTube by DistroKid

    Both of Us · Plantasia

    A Matter of Time

    ℗ Plantasia

    Released on: 2019-07-06

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • Returning Home to Mother Earth and Natural Music

    5:12

    Natural living sound inspires musician, sound therapist and recording artist, Shervin Boloorian, to reconnect with the land and the innate healing power of our biosphere in this elegant short film with original music.

    Shervin, a refugee and half-indigenous ethnic Kurd, transformed his life when he woke up to the unseen wisdom from nature's elements. He testifies to restoring his own health and peace of mind through building a relationship to the Earth through organic sound.

    Based in Bali, he now shares comforting and serene sound journeys and songs as sound medicine for a living.

    His new sound healing album, I Hear You, Mother Earth, comprises mostly of organic soundscapes, natural instruments and ancient healing songs from Indian, Tibetan, Indonesia, Afro-South American Yoruban and Indigenous Amazonian traditions threaded into the music. The album is produced by UK chart-topping artist and producer, Ric Peet and is available on a donation basis now until the pre-order period closes (till April 21, 2020).
    ___________________________________________________________________________
    Returning Back Home Shervin Boloorian
    Contains music from the forthcoming self-released album: I Hear You, Mother Earth by Shervin Boloorian, (all rights reserved)
    Preorder Album Here:
    Directed by Gary Turner
    Filmed at Swasti Eco Cottages, Ubud, Bali.

    Instagram: Sound Healing Bali
    FB: Shervin Boloorian (artist)
    Download a FREE track from the album on soundcloud here:

    Listen to previous releases: shervinboloorian.bandcamp.com
    Sign up for Sound Healing Bali's Youtube channel

    Shervin (M.A.) received his certification as sound therapist in 2011 from the Tama-Do Academy of Sound, Color, and Movement. He launched and ran Bali's first sound healing program in 2012 at the Yoga Barn, Ubud and has presented throughout Bali and the world.

  • Shover Reviews Stuff - Episode Four

    1:57

    Aaron Shover review a Merrimack Owl Sculpture from the Cahokia Mounds Gift Shop, Around the World in a Day the seventh studio album by American recording artist Prince, Catching the Big Fish: Meditation, Consciousness and Creativity by David Lynch, Mort Garson's legendary 1976 album Mother Earth's Plantasia, and the Floppy Fish cat toy.

  • Rhapsody in Green

    2:05

    Provided to YouTube by BWSCD, Inc.

    Rhapsody in Green (Alternate Take) · Mort Garson

    Music from Patch Cord Productions

    ℗ 2020 Emanay Music under exclusive license to Sacred Bones Records

    Released on: 2020-11-06

    Auto-generated by YouTube.

  • PlantAphex

    3:17

    random mix in a heatwave
    ????????????
    Plantasia - Mort Garson (1976)
    Bucephalus Bouncing Ball - Aphex Twin
    Concerto For Philodendron & Pothos - Mort Garson (1976)
    4 bit 9d api+e+6 [126.26] - Aphex Twin

  • The Mother Earth - Acid Jazz

    1:10

    The Mother Earth - (Never Gonna Get) To War (1995) Acid Jazz
    The Mother Earth:
    Matt Deighton - vocals, guitar,
    Bryn Barklam - piano, keyboards,
    Neil Corcoran - bass guitar,
    Chris White - drums

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